Samuel Blodget, an American inventor, born at Woburn, Mass., in 1720, died at Haverhill, N. II., Sept. 1, 1807. Before the revolution he was judge of common pleas in New Hampshire, and was at the siege of Louisburg in 1745. In 1783, having raised by a machine of his own invention a valuable cargo from a vessel sunk near Plymouth, he became possessed with the idea of recovering the buried treasures of the ocean, and went to Spain and to England with this view. He desired to obtain a contract for raising the Royal George, but meeting with no encouragement returned to New Hampshire, and in 1791 commenced the manufacture of duck. In 1793 he removed to Haverhill, and began the construction of the canal which bears his name, around the Amos-keag falls. Before it was completed, after spending large sums upon it, he became embarrassed, and was thrown into prison for debt. He was rigidly temperate in his habits, and had peculiar theories about exposure to the weather.

Castle of Blois.

Castle of Blois.

He expected by his mode of life to prolong it to the age of 100 years, but at the age of 87 he died from the effects of exposure on a journey from Boston to Haverhill.