Halle , a city of Prussian Saxony, on the right bank of the Saale, 20 m. N. W. of Leip-sic; pop. in 1871, 52,639. It consists of Halle proper with five suburbs, and of the two ancient towns of Glaucha and Neumarkt. The streets, except in some modern parts, are generally crooked, narrow, and badly paved. The principal public buildings are the church of St. Mary, with four towers, built in the Gothic style about the middle of the 10th century, to which belong a library of 20,000 volumes and the so-called red tower on the market place; that of St. Maurice, also built in the Gothic style, and that of St. Ulrich; the cathedral, the city hall, the ruins of the castle of Moritzburg, anciently a residence of the archbishops of Magdeburg, the university, and the Francke institutions in the suburb of Glaucha. The university, which was founded in 1694 by the elector (afterward king) Frederick, and in 1815, after having been closed by Napoleon in 1806 and 1813, united with that of Wittenberg, was most flourishing in the beginning of this century, and counted many eminent men among its professors.

There were 1,300 students in 1829, but subsequently the number declined to less than 600. In 1873, however, the number had again increased to 1,073. Among the institutions more or less closely connected with the university are a normal, philological, and theological seminary, an academy of the natural sciences, a medical and surgical clinical institute, a school of midwifery, an anatomical theatre, a botanical garden, an observatory, and a library of 100,000 volumes. The Francke institutions comprise an orphan asylum, several schools, and a printing press. Halle has manufactories of woollen and linen goods, stockings, gloves, silk buttons, hardware, leather, and starch, and an active commerce. The extensive salt works in the city belong to a company, and those outside of it to the government. The persons employed in the latter are known as the Halloren, and were long supposed to be of Slavic origin, but are now regarded either as Celts or as descendants of the earliest Frankish settlers. - Halle is first mentioned, as the castle of Halla, under Charlemagne. Otho the Great gave it to the archbishop of Magdeburg, and Otho H. erected it into a city in 981. It became so powerful in the course of time as to contend in the 13th century, often successfully, with its feudal lords, and to resist in 1435 a large army under the elector of Saxony. The reformation was introduced here in its earliest period.

The city suffered greatly during the thirty years' war, and came in 1648 into the possession of the house of Brandenburg by the peace of Westphalia. Handel was born here.

University of Hallo.

University of Hallo.