Konieh, Or Koniah(Anc. Iconium), a city of Asia Minor, capital of the vilayet of its name, about 280 m. S. E. of Constantinople; pop. about 40,000. The stout walls which surround it were built from the ruins of ancient Iconium by the Seljuk sovereigns, and display some interesting Greek inscriptions and other relics, which were so arranged in the mason work as to remain visible. Of more than 100 mosques which the city contains, 12 are large, and two are much admired for their magnificence. It has also several mrdreses or colleges, and the tomb of Mevlevi Jelal ed-Din, a Mussulman saint much revered throughout Turkey and the founder of the Mevlevi or whirling dervishes. This tomb is surmounted by a dome resting upon a cylindrical tower of a bright green color, and is an object of pilgrimage. Beyond the walls are suburbs as populous as the town itself. There are extensive gardens, and the surrounding country is in a high state of cultivation, supplying grain and flax in abundance. Like all Turkish towns renowned for superior sanctity, Konieh is full of dervishes, who subsist on alms. The inhabitants are principally engaged in the manufacture of carpets, and of blue and yellow leather.

They carry on a lively trade with Smyrna. - The ancient Iconium, which is mentioned by Xeno-phon, Cicero, and Strabo, and in the history of the apostles, was the capital of Lycaonia, but rose to importance only after the taking of Nicaea by the crusaders. The Seljuk sovereigns of Roum made the town their capital in the latter part of the 11th century; Frederick Barbarossa assaulted it in 1190; the sons of Genghis Khan subsequently became masters of it; and Bajazet II. made it the capital of Caramania in 1486. Ibrahim Pasha won here a decisive victory over the Turks, Dec. 30, 1832.

Konieh.

Konieh.