Macaque, a name given to several quadru-manous animals intermediate between the long-tailed monkeys and the baboons, constituting the genus macacns (Lacep.), characterized by a facial angle of 40° or 45°, elongated muzzle, distinct superciliary ridges, long and large canines, short tail, and rather compact form. The common macaque (M. cynomolgus, Lacep.) is olive-brown above and grayish white below, with black feet; it inhabits the interior of Africa, and, according to Geoffroy, the island of Java. It has the coloring and the comparatively long tail of the guenons, but the heavy and strong form of the baboons; the general position is on all-fours or seated on the ground, taking food either by the hands or immediately by the mouth, and filling the ample cheek pouches before swallowing anything. The wande-roo, or lion-tailed monkey (M. Silenus, Lacep.), from the Indian archipelago, is black above, with grayish longer hair on the back of the neck and a gray beard; under parts gray; tail with a tuft at the end; it is about as large as a spaniel dog, living in the woods, feeding on roots and leaves, and of harmless disposition.

The pig-tailed macaque (M. nemestrinus, Geoffr.), from Java and Sumatra, is deep brown above, with a black dorsal stripe, tail slender and reaching to the middle of the thigh, and limbs yellowish. Some of these macaques have been placed in the genus inuus (Cuv.), which ineludes the Barbary ape, or magot (/. sylvanus, Geoffr.), the tailless species living wild upon the rock of Gibraltar, and being the only monkey found in Europe. This, with the last named species, leads to the cynocephali or dog-faced baboons. These monkeys are frequently seen in menageries, and when young are easily tamed; less active and stronger than ordinary monkeys, they have not the ferocity and disgusting habits of the baboons. (See Ape, and Baboon.)

Pig tailed Macaque (Macacus nemestrinus).

Pig-tailed Macaque (Macacus nemestrinus).

Barbary Ape (Inuus sylvanus).

Barbary Ape (Inuus sylvanus).