Porter, a well-known malt-liquor, which differs from ale and beer, in consequence of its being brewed with malt that has been highly dried.

As porter constitutes the principal beverage of all ranks of people in this metropolis, particularly of the labouring classes ; and as if is too frequently adulterated with deleterious drugs, and has lately been advanced in price ; we think it useful to communicate the following recipe, together with the present prices of the ingredients (extracted from Mr. Child's late Treatise, entitled Every Man his own Brewer) : according to which, every industrious family, where room and other conveniences favour the attempt, may prepare their own porter at a more reasonable rate than it is now sold, and without apprehending any adulteration.

/.

s.

d.

One peck of malt - - - -

0

2

6

A quarter of a pound of liquorice-root - -

0

O

1

Spanish juice - -

0

0

2

Essentia bina - - -

0

O

2

Colour -

o

0

2

Half a pound of treacle -

0

0

3

A quarter of a pound of hops -

0

0

6

Capsicum and ginger -

0

0

l

The expence of coals -

0

o

6

0

4

6

These articles, when managed conformably to the directions given in the" article Brewing, will produce sue gallons of good Porter, which, at Is. 6d. per gallon, would dost 9s.; so that one half of the expence is saved by making it at horne,

The advantages thence arising are obvious; for, independently of its being a great object of economy, a more palatable liquor will result from the undertaking ; and, being prepared in the house, it will afford additional pleasure, nay, often contribute to the prevention of a most detestable habit, that of tippling in ale-houses.—The proportions above stated are calculated only for small families, or such as cannot conveniently spare a room, or procure a proper apparatus for brewing: hence, by augmenting the ingredients, as circumstances may require, any quantity of pure and wholesome beer will be obtained.

For the information of those, who may be totally unacquainted with the process of brewing porter, we shall add a short explanation of the manner in which the essentia Una and the colour are prepared. In order to procure the first of these ingredients, a quarter of a pound of moist sugar should be boiled in an iron vessel, till it attain to the consistence of a thick, black syrup, which is remarkably bitter.—The. colour is produced by boiling a similar quantity of moist sugar, till it acquire a taste between sweet and bitter: it imparts the fine mellow tint, that is so much admired in good porter. in preparing these two ingredients, however, it will be necessary to employ a small portion of pure, or of lime-water, to bring it to a proper temper;" because they will otherwise grow hard and dry, if suffered to stand till they become cold. The essence and colour, are added to the first wort, with which they are boiled, and constitute the basis of porter.

This preparation forms an agreeable and salutary beverage to most constitutions; and, if it be mild, possesses gently laxative properties: —when bottled, and kept for some time, it acquires a high flavour, and is much esteemed, especially after having made a sea-voyage. A similar effect will result from sending such liquor to a considerable distance by laud-carriage. The bottles ought to be carefully washed, and drained, till they become perfectly dry. After being filled with the liquor, they are suffered to stand for twenty-four hours, before they are corked, so that the porter may part with some portion of its fixed air, to prevent the bottles from cracking. At the end of that time, they should be closed with sound corks, which ought to be driven in, as closely as possible, and to a depth from l 1/2 to 2 inches, in order to exclude the air.

In regard to the relative salubrity of Porter, and other Malt-liquors, we have already expressed our opinion, in vol. i. pp. 241-2.