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Taylor On Golf Impressions, Comments And Hints



The vast extent and continual growth of the game must be my apology for Taylor on Golf. I trust that it may prove of benefit to players, young and old, and also to those who may be considering the possibility of becoming identified with the game. I have dealt with the subject as concisely as possible, and my hope is that the path to success may, by what I have written, be rendered easier to my readers...

TitleTaylor On Golf Impressions, Comments And Hints
AuthorJ. H. Taylor
PublisherHutchinson & Co.
Year1905
Copyright1905, Hutchinson & Co.
AmazonTaylor on Golf: Impressions Comments and Hints

By J. H. Taylor, Open Champion 1894, 1895, and 1900

With Forty-Eight Illustrations Almost Entirely From Photographs Specially Taken For The Work

Fourth Edition With New Club Directory And Revised Rules And Lists Ok Championships

Taylor On Golf Impressions, Comments And Hints
-Preface
The vast extent and continual growth of the game must be my apology for Taylor on Golf. I trust that it may prove of benefit to players, young and old, and also to those who may be considering the pos...
-Chapter I. The Rise, Progress, And Prospects Of The Game
IT would be an almost impossible task to trace the history of golf from its origin. Were we to pin our faith to our old friend Punch, we should be in the happy position of believing that the game had ...
-Chapter II. Irish And Welsh Links. Caddies As Coming Champions
SPEAKING in a general sense, very little is heard of the rise and progress of the game in Wales, yet some really good links are to be found within the Principality, and golf is in great vogue both nor...
-Chapter III. Golf Outside The United Kingdom. Artisan Golf And Golfers
I HAVE spoken of the want of new space in Great Britain ; but in Greater Britain we shall find, and are already finding, an almost unlimited field for progression. In the Colonies the game has been bu...
-Chapter IV. University And Public School Golf
THE subject of University golf has been well threshed out during the past, and, taking all things into consideration, I think it may be said that there is really very little cause for concern. To my w...
-Chapter V. Championships I Have Played In
THE mere fact of a man being attached to a club either as a member or local professional does not necessarily mean he is able to play more than an ordinarily good game. The hall-mark of excellence is ...
-Chapter VI. A Memorable Championship. The Success Of Braid
M UIRFIELD and 1901 will take a prominent place in Scottish golf history for ever. Was it not on June 5th and 6th of the new century that Scotland reasserted herself? Not since 1893, when \V. Auchtcrl...
-A Memorable Championship. The Success Of Braid. Continued
The hope of the Scotsmen was indeed playing at the very top of his game. Going to this lastnamed hole, he played wide of the green and also overran the hole with the next stroke. Again it was a good p...
-Chapter VII. Championship Courses, And What They Are Like
AFTER the Championships it is only fit that something should be said concerning the courses upon which they are decided. But here I am faced by a task of considerable magnitude, for opinions upon thei...
-Chapter VIII. Courses Where The Championship Might Be Played
AS will be readily seen from the previous chapter, Championship courses are few in number, and the blue-ribbon events of the year are decided upon them of necessity in quick rotation. There is no reas...
-Chapter IX. The Physical Strain Of A Professional's Life
IT is a frequent comment: So-and-so played much below his usual form! And yet I wonder whether the person who may have penned such an expression of opinion wastes a thought upon the physical strain ...
-Chapter X. Professional Remuneration
THAT the professional golfer's life is not exactly one long siesta upon a bed of roses I have attempted to show in the previous chapters, and in saying that I must plead it as an excuse for touching u...
-Chapter XI. Prize Money And Expenses
PRIZES cannot fall to the lot of all. In respect of tournaments, let us suppose the top prize amounts to 20. A professional, we will still suppose, plays for and wins it. But he is not that amount th...
-Chapter XII. Tournaments And Invitations
COMING now to the question of tournaments, I regret that there is a great and a growing tendency to make them of a somewhat exclusive character. It is done in this way, that only a certain number of f...
-Chapter XIII. County Golf And Club Games
COUNTY golf, I regret to say, appears only too likely to die a more or less natural death, though why there should be such a want of interest in it I quite fail to see. Many of those with whom I have ...
-Chapter XIV. General Hints On Learning The Game
WE are told that the poet is born, not made; and in the matter of golf I am inclined to think this saying may be very well paraphrased, for it is beyond possibility of contradiction that a player who ...
-General Hints On Learning The Game. Continued
Insensibly, perhaps, but none the less surely, you drift into habits and mannerisms which you will find it impossible to shake off. They will cling to you as closely as Sinbad's old man of the sea. Th...
-Chapter XV. The Most Common Fault
I SUPPOSE the act of topping his drive is by far the commonest fault with an inexperienced player. Many causes tend to make this mistake of more frequent occurrence than any other blunder witnessed up...
-Chapter XVI. The Most Useful Strokes And Finishing Touches
SPEAKING now of the most useful strokes a man can make himself proficient in, I think the best and most paying of all is the approach shot. A player of the game will readily understand what I mean by ...
-Chapter XVII. Golf For Ladies
NOT so many years ago golf as a game was but a dead letter as far as ladies were concerned. Now, however, the case is vastly different, for a big boom occurred about six years ago, and since that date...
-Chapter XVIII. What Is Required In Ladies' Golf
GREATER muscular development is required in golf than in tennis or racquets, as far as the forearm is concerned, but it is beyond question that practice at these games develops the necessary muscles i...
-Chapter XIX. The Art Of Medal Play
SUPPOSING now that the golfer has been fairly started on his way, for I do not propose entering upon the technicalities of the pastime until a little later on, he is probably intent upon playing a goo...
-Chapter XX. A Method Of Play
IT is a patent fact that every golfer must be possessed of a method of some kind. As I have already said, it is useless attacking the game in a haphazard, go-as-you-please kind of style, Micawber-like...
-Chapter XXI. The Art Of Match Play
MATCH play provides a decided contrast to play in medal competitions, as noted in the previous chapters, for it is play in which a greater freedom and latitude may be occasionally allowed but in which...
-Chapter XXII. The Acceptance Of Risks
N EVER despair, no matter what kind of an opponent you may find yourself pitted against. If he should be a longer driver than you are, don't let that fact upset you in the slightest. Neither must you ...
-Chapter XXIII. The Best Hole
INTENSE interest, from a golfer's point of view, has been excited over a controversy that has raged over what has been described as the best hole. Naturally opinions have varied considerably when a ...
-Chapter XXIV. Lengthening The Courses
EVEN in high-class golf, as it is generally known, the modern tendency to lengthen the courses is observable, owing, perhaps, to the degree of perfection to which the game has been gradually brought. ...
-Chapter XXV. Inland And Seaside Courses
AS regards the merits or demerits of inland and - seaside courses, the question is of the widest As for a comparison of a course, by the sad sea waves, with a course embowered in trees, I think there ...
-Chapter XXVI. Private Courses - Their Utility And Their Advantage
THE establishment of a private golf course at Windsor by His Majesty has no doubt placed the hall-mark upon this mode of enjoying the pastime - select in character, yet in all ways calculated to advan...
-Chapter XXVII. Golf In America
GOLF to-day in America is more popular than ever, and appears to hold the popular fancy in a stronger bond of sympathy than any other branch of athletics, no matter whether it be baseball, football, o...
-Golf In America. Continued
The extent of the country is so great, however, that a golfer who may be so fortunately situated that he is not bound to any one place in particular by business ties may woo the golf goddess successfu...
-Chapter XXVIII. Golf-Clubs And Their Manufacture
AS marking the rapid advance made in all departments of the game, it is only necessary for me to remark that but a few years ago the art of manufacturing the various kinds of golf-clubs was confined s...
-Chapter XXIX. Machine And Hand-Made Clubs
NOT so very long ago it was considered on all sides that the task of manufacturing golf-club heads by means of machinery would be an impossible one. This was an entirely erroneous impression. For to-d...
-Chapter XXX. Driving: The Grip
IN my previous hints to the intending player I laid down the general rules that would be best followed in learning the game, rules that are dependent for their success upon the practical use that may ...
-Driving: The Grip. Part 2
That is the only difference I have been able to discover between us, and there is very little in that, the conformation of the hands and knuckles being apparently the only reason for this slight varia...
-Driving: The Grip. Part 3
In attempting this proper distance the beginner, in the majority of instances, does one of two things. He either gets too near the ball, or goes to the other extreme, while occasionally he gets the di...
-Chapter XXXI. Driving: The One Thing Necessary
IF a perfectly timed and powerful stroke is the object of the player, he must fix his eye upon the ball, or at least upon the ground exactly behind and beneath it; and once he has concentrated his att...
-Chapter XXXII. The Approach Generally
A PLAYER must not only be fully capable of driving off the tee and feeling at home upon the green. He must be good at the intermediate shots, free from awkwardness, and full of nerve. There are more t...
-Chapter XXXIII. The Approach With The Mashie
WHEN I am engaged in playing the approach shot I have spoken of as being within the hundred yards' limit, my position is taken up somewhat nearer the ball than when playing a longer shot with an iron....
-The Approach With The Mashie. Continued
I am led to repeat my caution, already expressed, that the greatest care should be shown in this swing, for, as is the case in the drive, the swing to the rear affects the swing to the front in exactl...
-Chapter XXXIV. The Use Of The Cleek
FASHIONS vary in golf as in everything else, and it must be admitted that at the present time that most useful club, the cleek, is not used by golfers to nearly so great an extent as was the case only...
-Chapter XXXV. The Iron And The Short Approach
AGAIN returning to details. In playing with the iron the stance is different from that taken in the case of any other club. The right foot must be advanced, and the left thrown back, with the ball on ...
-Chapter XXXVI. The Art Of Putting
AS I have before now pointed out, the game of golf is not won with the driver. One man may secure an advantage of many yards over an opponent in this way, but it by no means follows that he will neces...
-The Art Of Putting. Continued
In the holding or gripping of the club, the fingers must be allowed to play a very prominent part, for the palm of the hand should not be used for the purpose of grasping it. It must be held firmly, b...
-Chapter XXXVII. Getting Out Of Difficulties
IN the previous chapters I have described the best means by which the ball is to be got well away from the tee, and have presumed it has afterwards found a favourable lie. But we will now suppose it ...
-Chapter XXXVIII. Mistakes And Their Cures - Hazards, And How To Get Out Of Them
HAVING called attention to the possibility of falling into the faults of topping, slicing, and so on, possibly it would be as well were I to explain why these things occur. Topping a ball is one of ...
-Chapter XXXIX. The Baffy
COMMENT upon the game would not be complete unless there were some few lines devoted to what was at one time a universal club. In saying this, I am referring to the baffy, a club that at one period of...
-Chapter XL. The Golf Ball
IN the manufacture of the golf ball the crank has naturally had something to say; but the new and wonderful things, the creations of his brain, have not stood the test of time and practical experiment...
-Chapter XLI. The Upkeep Of Golf Links - An Expert Opinion
UPON the practical side of golf there is not a more important question than that concerning the care lavished upon the average golf links. The closer the turf the better the golf, and the greater the ...
-The Upkeep Of Golf Links - An Expert Opinion. Part 2
During the progress of the work all stones and roots should be thrown out. The digging being finished, the next operation is equivalent to harrowing or deeply raking. Rolling and raking alternately g...
-The Upkeep Of Golf Links - An Expert Opinion. Part 3
The battle of life on many links is owing to a lack of sufficient moisture, and we would find it possible to tide over a difficult and trying season if we occasionally paid greater attention to the m...
-The Upkeep Of Golf Links - An Expert Opinion. Part 4
Light rolling and mowing alternately are necessary in order to maintain the turf in a high state of perfection, combined with the judicious use of the proper kinds of renovating seeds, and enriching ...
-The Upkeep Of Golf Links - An Expert Opinion. Part 5
These, then, are Mr. Finlayson's recipes for the provision of good courses. Intelligent and careful methods are within the reach of all. Why, then, should some links be allowed to remain in a conditio...
-Club Directory. The Golf Clubs Of The United Kingdom
[Reproduced by kind permission from The Golfing Annual.'] England Bedfordshire. Apsley Guise and District Club Bedford Club. Ladies' Club. Bedfordshire County Ladies Club. Biggleswade, N. Bedfords...
-Club Directory. The Golf Clubs Of The United Kingdom. Part 2
Ladies' Club. Lee-on-the-Solent Club. Lymington Club. Lyndhurst, New Forest Club. Ladies' Club. Petersfield Club. Portsmouth, U.S. Club. Ladies' U.S. Club. Romsey, Halterworth Club. Shawford, Twyfor...
-Club Directory. The Golf Clubs Of The United Kingdom. Part 3
Ladies' Club. Hanger Hill Club. Ladies' Club. Hendon Club. Highgate and East Finchley Club. Highland Societies Association Inns of Court Club. Lloyd's Club. London Free Church Ministers' Society. ...
-Club Directory. The Golf Clubs Of The United Kingdom. Part 4
Southdown and Brighton Ladies' Club. Chichester Club. Summersdale Club. Copthorne Club. Working Men's Club. Crowborough Beacon Club. Ladies' Club. De La Warr Club. Eastbourne, Royal Eastbourne Clu...
-Club Directory. The Golf Clubs Of The United Kingdom. Part 5
Inveraray Club. Islay Club. Uisguintuie Club. Kirn, Cowal Club. Lismore Course. Lochgilphead Club. Oban Club. Taynuilt, Bunawe Club. Tiree Club. Scarnish Course Tobermory Club. Ayrshire. Ayr Cours...
-Club Directory. The Golf Clubs Of The United Kingdom. Part 6
Raeburn Short Hole Club. Register House Club. Rhadamanthian Club. Rockies Club. Rose and Thistle Club. Roseburn Club. Royal Asylum Club. Royal Bank Club. Royal Colleges of Physicians and Surgeons' Cl...
-Club Directory. The Golf Clubs Of The United Kingdom. Part 7
Kingussie Club. Laggan Club. Lochiel Club. Newtonmore Club. Spean Bridge Club. Uig Club. Klncardineshirb Auchinblae Club. Fcttercairn Club. Stonehaven Club. Ladies' Club. Klnross-Shirb Kinness...
-Rules Of Golf As Approved By The Royal And Ancient Golf
Club Of St. Andrews, September, 1902, And Amended September, 1904 1. Definitions: - (a) The Game of Golf is played by two sides, each playing its own ball. A side consists either of one or of two pla...
-Rules Of Golf As Approved By The Royal And Ancient Golf. Part 2
9. In playing through the green, any loose impediment (not being in or touching a hazard) which is within a club length of the ball may be removed. If the player's ball move after any such loose imped...
-Rules Of Golf As Approved By The Royal And Ancient Golf. Part 3
19. When the ball is on the putting-green, no mark shall be placed, nor line drawn as a guide. The line of the putt may be pointed out by the player's caddie, his partner, or his partner's caddie, but...
-Special Rules For Stroke Competitions
1. In Stroke Competitions the competitor who holes the stipulated course in fewest strokes shall be the winner. 2. If the lowest scores be made by two or more competitors, the tie or ties shall be de...
-Rules For Three-Ball Matches
In matches in which three players play against each other, each playing his own ball (hereinafter referred to as a three-ball match), or in which one player plays his own ball against the best ball ...
-Etiquette Of Golf
1. No player, caddie or onlooker should move or talk during a stroke. 2. No player should play from the tee until the party in front have played their second strokes and are out of range, nor play up...







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previous page: Present-Day Golf | by George Duncan, Bernard Darwin
  
page up: Golf Books
  
next page: The Spirit Of The Links | by Henry Leach