Harmony of colour is produced by an equable use and distribution of the primary colours, whether used simply as such, or united in various proportions in their compounds. Harmony is recognised in a picture when nothing exists in it that disturbs the eye by violent opposition or contrast of colours; judicious contrast, however, tends much to produce harmony, when the force of the contrast is diminished by the juxtaposition of tones partaking more or less of the colours employed in producing the contrast. This we shall find is the process employed by nature, the reds in which are harmonised with the contrasting green by hues of orange, or yellow green; and so with other colours. Harmony of colour in painting is best obtained by setting the palette with those pigments which, through the prevalence of any of the primaries, blend with, or, as it were, run into each other. Thus, commencing with white, we proceed to yellow, orange or yellow-reds, red, blue-reds, blues, green-blues, greens, browns, grey, and black.

A palette can be set warm or cold, as the subject may require, by selecting pigments in which blue predominates or is deficient.

Primaries.

Blue is con-trasted by ..

Red and Yellow,

or Orange.

Secondaries.

Red is con-trasted by ..

Blue and Yellow,

► or Green.

Yellow is con-trasted by ..

Blue and Red,

or Purple.

Secondaries.

[Orange, or

Redand Yellow,

is contrasted by Blue.

Primaries.

Green, or

Blue and Yellow,

is contrasted by Red.

Purple, or

Blue and Red,

is contrasted by Yellow.