The Guild of the Brave Poor Things, which is now well known throughout the country, was formed by Sister Grace after reading " The Story of a Short Life," by Mrs. Ewing. All the members are in some way crippled, but all try to live up to the motto of the Guild, "Loetus sorte mea " (" Happy in my lot").

The West London Mission has done much good work in the cause of temperance. We are told that " every Sister, whatever her department, is equally concerned with this problem "; that while allowing for those differences of temperament and method which are so d is -tinctive of the efforts of the Sisters, there is complete unanimity in their conclusions that to face the drink question from the purely negative standpoint is worse than useless. If the drink traffic is to be controlled by the State and the number of public-houses to be reduced, the State and the Temperance party and the churches between them must supply something else in their place. Such a conviction has characterised the efforts of the Sisters from the beginning, and has led to the concerts and happy evenings and goose clubs which in old days puzzled the pious. In every neighbourhood they have fought the traffic by providing attractions in its place."

In addition, the Mission organises Mothers' Meetings, Sewing Meetings, Coal Clubs, Penny Banks, etc., and undertakes much district visiting. The district extends from Soho to Seymour Street and Charlton Street in the Euston Road.

One of the Mission nurses said: " We Mission nurses are specially privileged, because we have the whole Sisterhood behind us. Thus we not only nurse people, but find them work again after they have recovered, through the Other Sisters and their departments. We have often been enabled to set a whole family on its feet again, and to help its members in every possible way, morally and physically. A daughter whose health imperatively demands a holiday has been enabled to obtain it, and a son who has never been in the habit of attending a place of worship will go to one of our halls. When the father of a family dies we look after the widow and get the children into suitable homes." This is done by the relief work of the Sisterhood, which is conducted on very sound principles. A Pension Fund was started by the late Sister Edith. It is said by one who knew her that " perhaps no one ever loved and understood the deserving poor as she, or was wiser in aiding them in times of misfortune."

In The Creche The West London Mission provides for children whose mothers have to go out to work. Fourpence a day is charged for each child

In The Creche The West London Mission provides for children whose mothers have to go out to work. Fourpence a day is charged for each child

No work by women for women is more needed than rescue work, and here the Sisters of the People are up and doing. Their experience is that they very rarely meet any English girls who have deliberately chosen to live the lives from which the Sisters desire to rescue them, and that most would gladly escape if they could. In Winchester House they find a way of escape. About fifty girls pass through this home each year, the large majority of whom, as a result of their time there, are leading happy, useful lives. The Mission provides a Home for the Dying, St. Luke's House, which contains at present thirty-four beds and a child's cot. The number of applications far exceed the number of available beds. It is intended chiefly for the poor of London, although cases from the country are admitted under special circumstances. The existence of this 'home is not only an inestimable boon to the sufferers themselves, but it also enables those whose energies were absorbed in nursing them to continue their wage-earning occupations.

Those who wish to see what the Mission is doing for men should go to the Lyceum Theatre on any Sunday evening at 7 o'clock, and see that great building filled with a congregation of between 3,000 and 4,000.

Mrs. Price Hughes is indefatigable in carrying on her husband's work. She will be glad to give further information to anyone applying to her by letter at Lincoln House, Greek Street, Soho.

The Work Done by the Nuns Educating and Training Deaf and Dumb Girls   the Life of Deaf Mutes in the Convent   How They are Taught Dressmaking, Spinning, Lacemaking, and Laundry Work

The Work Done by the Nuns Educating and Training Deaf and Dumb Girls - the Life of Deaf Mutes in the Convent - How They are Taught Dressmaking, Spinning, Lacemaking, and Laundry Work

St. Mary's Dominican Convent, Cabra, Dublin, is one of the largest Catholic institutions in the world, and visitors from all parts of the world state that it is not only one of the most beautiful, but one of the most up-to-date of Catholic institutions.

The convent is situated in the county of Dublin, on a hill overlooking the city. On one side is the well-known Phoenix Park, backed by the Dublin mountains, on the other are the hills and dales of the counties of Dublin and Meath.

In the grounds, which are very beautiful and filled with forest trees and flowers, are tennis-courts and croquet-lawns for the recreation of the children. There are also swings and a covered gymnasium.