Breeder and Exhibitor

The Friend of Man - Why He Deserves His Name - Dogs of Distant Lands - America's Own Terrier - The Brussels Griffon and His Family - One of the Oldest of Toy Breeds - The Butterfly Dog - A Dog which can Stand on a Man's Hand - Curious Hairless Breeds - The

Disappearing Dingo

Go where you will, over the trackless snows of the Arctic in quest of the illusive Pole, or across the sun-scorched desert in search of antiquities, game, or water, you may, if so you will, have one companion who will not grumble if things go wrong, or abandon you if death threatens to stalk the stalker.

As did the child in Mr. Kipling's poem, you will realise that " Bingo " (or whatever his name may be) is indeed " your first best friend." And you will know the meaning of the glib phrase " the dog is the friend of man," a friend such as no other animal can be, whether wise as the elephant or cunning as the monkey.

Wherever man can tread, there a dog of some sort can follow him. It is thus he has a right to be called a friend.

As our human friends differ in good looks, talents, and characteristics, so equally do our canine ones. Good looks, and even intelligence, depend greatly upon environment, and in describing some of the less well-known varieties this must be borne in mind.

A typical Brussels griffon, one of the quaintest looking of foreign toy dogs, but most intelligent and affectionate

A typical Brussels griffon, one of the quaintest looking of foreign toy dogs, but most intelligent and affectionate

Photo. Fall

To begin with, let the Boston terrier of the United States first make his bow to Every Woman's Encyclopedia. He is one of the smartest and "cutest" of his race, which is as it should be in a land where " get on or get out" is a favourite motto. And, like much else in that new country, he owes his origin - as raw material, that is - to the old country, being a descendant of the early bull-and-terrier of the middle of the last century. Mr. Robert Leighton traces the ancestry of the breed from certain dogs taken over to America about that date, amongst whom were Hooper's Judge and Wells' Eph, the latter being the sire of the first real Boston tern Barnard's Tom.

Boston so warmly encouraged the new breed, and fought so pluckily for its recognition by the American Kennel Club, that the honour of naming it is well deserved. Since 1893 the game little dog caught on."' and has ome the acknowledged native dog. He is the pet of the " fancy." and enormous prices have been paid for good specimens.

The rigid quarantine laws of this land and the prohibition of ear cropping have prevented the appearance of Boston terriers on our show benches, but there are signs that he may be introduced soon.

In appearance the Boston terrier is not unlike the French bulldog, described on page 3813, Vol. 6, but he is much larger and heavier, weighing from fifteen to thirty pounds. He should always be a brindle, with a white blaze (or mark) on the face, and white on chest and paws. His character is excellent, for he is plucky, but not quarrelsome, obedient, loyal, and most affectionate and clever. Altogether, our American cousins have evolved a breed which does them the greatest of credit, and one which is sure of a hearty welcome when it does cross the water.

The Griffon

This small dog is truly one of the quaintest of its race. In countenance it has a strange,' uncanny resemblance to a wise little old-man monkey, though its agile and graceful little person is all its own, as, too, is its extreme dignity.

Though the correct name of the dog, griffon Bruxellois, shows a Belgian origin, and the race itself is adopted by the Belgians as their own, yet without doubt it has a mixed and British ancestry. Yorkshire terrier, ruby spaniel, and Irish terrier are all said to have been used to produce the griffon. However, that is a matter for experts only. Meanwhile, Belgium claims him, and two English clubs see that he is not imposed upon in any way and is kept up to the mark in every respect.

The illustration shows his general appearance. He, if a Brussels griffon, wears his tail docked, his ears semi-erect, except abroad, where they are always cropped, and his cobby little person should be clad in a red, wiry coat. His eyes should be large and black, and his nose as short and his jaw as projecting as he can manage. His brother, the griffon Beige, may be black and tan, or grey, or fawn; while the third member of his family, the petit Brabancon should wear his coat quite smooth.

The griffon is most popular as a light weight of about five pounds, but is allowed to attain the weight of nine pounds as a maximum.

  Rosemead Laura,  a beautiful specimen of the most elegant of foreign toys, the Italian greyhound

" Rosemead Laura," a beautiful specimen of the most elegant of foreign toys, the Italian greyhound

Photo, Everett

The papillon, or butterfly dog, a favourite Continental toy dog. It derives its name from the butterfly like appearance of the ears when erect

The papillon, or butterfly dog, a favourite Continental toy dog. It derives its name from the butterfly-like appearance of the ears when erect

Photo, Fall

Griffon puppies are not easy to rear, and as yet the breed is both fashionable and costly, especially in the case of a small good-coated and coloured griffon Bruxellois. The little dog is lively, affectionate, and most intelligent, and makes an ideal pet dog for a town house or flat.

The Italian Greyhound

This is the most exquisite of toys, and almost as fragile in appearance as it is graceful, though one of the most perfect specimens, Miss Mackenzie's Jack, lived to see his seventeenth birthday. Its foes are cold and damp, and in our islands care is necessary to keep the dainty pet from both. That may be the reason for fanciers being few in this breed, though such as exist are enthusiastic, and the race has its own specialist club to foster it.