Useful and Pretty Covers in Linen - Designs for Embroidery - Conventional Patterns - Variety of

Stitches - Floral Designs

Book-lovers always care for their books, and use a cover in which to carry the particular volume in use.

For the cover brown linen, holland, plain substantial silk, good sateen are all suitable materials, and may be decorated with any embroidery silks available.

To Cut the Cover. Measure round the book from edge to edge, and cut the linen four inches longer and four inches broader, to allow good turnings. Fold down two inches at the top and bottom ; damp, and press well with a warm iron, then fold over the two sides to a depth of two inches. Turn in and sew the raw edges ; and to form the case into which to slip the book neatly sew together the two ends.

Some Simple Designs

The first design shown looks well worked in two shades of art green, the greater part being done in the dark shade, tipped with narrow satin stitches of the light shade, with the centre leaf and the spirals worked in the light, edged with small satin-stitched circles or French knots in the dark.

Next embroider the cover in satin or crewel stitch, after the design has been carefully sketched in pencil or obtained by means of a paper tracing. These can be purchased in many varieties of patterns from any fancy-work depot at quite a small cost.

When the cover is finished, sew silk cord to the fronts, forming loops of sufficient length to slip easily over the arm. This is a most convenient method of carrying a book, and the cover effectually protects the binding from being soiled.

A linen book cover completed. Knotted cords and loops sewn to the front edges form a convenient handle for carrying the volume

A linen book cover completed. Knotted cords and loops sewn to the front edges form a convenient handle for carrying the volume

If the book has to be carried about much.

or is somewhat heavy, it is as well to strengthen the linen carrier by narrow linen bands sewn to its edge.

Various shades of green and terra-cotta are suggested for carrying out floral designs.

The conventional floral design gives much scope to the clever designer. A variety of stitches are used in the above example, worked in terra cottas and green

The conventional floral design gives much scope to the clever designer. A variety of stitches are used in the above example, worked in terra-cottas and green

The edges of the petals are worked in satin stitch to a depth of a quarter of an inch, and are filled in with paler shades.

In the exact centre of the flower a small square of the linen is left uncovered, on which a few French knots are worked.

To vary the style of the stitches for the leaves as much as possible, work some in crewel stitch, filling up the whole of each leaf, and shading them from dark to light, and veining them down the centre.

Work other leaves on the outside edge with uneven buttonhole stitch, and the centres lengthwise and crosswise with outline stitch. Where the threads cross, insert small, even crosses at intervals of a different coloured silk, as shown in the illustration. Also work the outline of some of the leaves in crewel stitch, with lattice-work in the centre, and the edge buttonhole stitched, with the centre merely veined.

The stalks can be varied by employing stem stitch and the trail, the latter being worked by commencing at the top of the stem, holding the working thread firmly down on the outline with the left thumb, making a stitch over the thread by putting the needle through the material on the left side above the thread, and bringing it out under the thread on the right side a little lower down.