In the Horticulturist of February, 1852, at the request of the late A. J. Downing, I gave a practical account of the Cold Grapery at this place which was planted in March, 1850, and, as the question, "will it pay," has often been put to me during the interval of time which has elapsed, I have thought that an estimate based upon the produce and expenses up to the present time, might be of service in your journal. I would here premise that there is nothing extraordinary in the amount of fruit, more than what others are obtaining by skill, care, and attention. The average weight of the respective crops given, if taken collectively, would be one pound per bunch, all of which would have readily sold at from fifty to seventy-five cents per pound; the lowest price, however, is only calculated. The following number of bunches of good quality have been cut in the respective years: 1851 ,262 bunches; 1852, 618 bunches; 1853, 918 bunches; 1854, 1147 bunches; making a total of 2945 bunches.

The following calculation, which is as correctly stated as can be, will show the balance side of the question:

2945 lbs, at 50 cts...........................

$1472 50

Dedot labor, 1st year,.

$50 00

" " 2d " ..........

.100 00

" " 3d " ...............................,

150 00

" " 4th " ................................

.200 00

" " 5th " .................................

.225 00

Yearly dressing of manure, at $20, ........................................

100 00

Repairs, painting, etc,................................

200 00

-1025 00

$447 50

By the above example it will be Been that there is $447 above the lowest wholesale market prices, and as the house, border, etc, cost about $2000, it leaves a surplus profit of 4 per cent per annum upon invested capital, which, in the present position, looks somewhat low; but it must be understood that, in this case, profit was not the object - everything was done regardless of expense, to make a good and handsome structure. The best French crystal glass was used, and all labor paid by the day; besides which, in the first year, there is no return profit, and the last season is the only one in which a full crop has been allowed. Take into consideration, too, that the labor account for management is reckoned at $2 per day, and it will be readily seen that a good and suitable house may be built and tended so as to give a large return profit A house of equal dimensions, and well finished, can be erected at $12 per lineal foot, with the exception of cistern, force-pump, hose, and tank; and if we make an estimate of all incidental expenses on a house equal to the above, and fifty feet long, it will stand thus:

House, 50 feet long, furnished with two costs of paint, at $12,.......

.$600 00

Brick cistern, cemented, 10 feet squre, .........................

. 70 00

Tank, Force-pump, and Hose,..............................

, 90 00

25 tons of manure for borders, at $2

. 00 00

Material for drainage,.........................

. 20 00

90 bushels of bones, at 50 cts........................

45 00

100 bushels of charcoal, etc......................

. 15 00

Labor - making borders, etc.....................

, 20 00

48 vines. at 50 cts...................................

. 24 00

$934 00

As, in the first example, the house is 74 feet long, and, in the latter, 50 feet, the comparative weight of fruit that may be taken will be about two-thirds, or 1964 lbs, at the same prices, making the total value for the five years $982; and making the same comparison in labor, expenses, etc, in both cases, we may put down $298 gain upon a capital of $934, which shows a profit of about six per cent per annum, and this, too, at the commencement If we were to calculate upon seven years, the per centage would amount to nine per cent; and continued further, it would be still greater, as the vines will continue each season to produce a full crop.

From these illustrations it will be readily Been that, with good management, there is no loss in having a Cold Grapery, even though partial failure may occur.