The accompanying box will show evidence for itself, that I have, for the second year, found means of arresting the fearful progress of the curculio, which is by syringing the trees, after the fall of the blossom, with a mixture of whitewash and flour of sulphur, in the proportion of eighteen double handfuls of sulphur to a barrel of tolerably thick whitewash, made of unslaked lime. The sediment of this mixture will answer for a second and third barrel, merely filled with water, and well stirred.

I applied the above three times a week for four weeks, and have met with great success, having been obliged to prop the limbs to sustain the weight of the fruit The trees are ten years old, and have blossomed every spring; but have never until last year ripened any fruit.

The specimens I send you are Bolmar's Washington, and you will observe upon some of them the marks of that little infamous Turk, which are nicely healed oyer, leaving the crescent to light up those who may have doubts that they are the production of a curculio district Syringe well, and although the fruit may be stung, it will come to perfection.

I am glad to find that Mr. Stokes has also been successful in raising this most delicious fruit; and his idea of coloring the whitewash is a good one, as it does away with the glaring effect given by the lime.

I have doubts of the practicability of using a rose upon the tin garden pump, as it will soon stop up with particles of lime, and become useless. I prefer the lip which generally comes with these pumps. This may be bent in such a manner as to flatten the stream as it passes out the spout, and thus disperse it over the tree. I did not notice that any of the fruit withered or turned yellow, as spoken of by Mr. Stokes - of course there were some, as is the case in the best plum districts, that decayed and fell from the trees, making room for those that are left to have a chance to swell.

I am a subscriber to your periodical I reside in New Jersey, and do business in New York. If the inclosed paper is correct, why can not we have strawberries in the same manner in our locality as they have them in Columbus ? Please notice this communication in the Horticultwrist, and oblige a true friend seeking information. A. F. B.

"A correspondent of the Cincinnati Gazette thus describes a visit to the estate of Mr. Peabody, an eminent horticulturist near Columbus, Georgia:

'Mr Peabody has a very healthy location on a hill in the pine wood - over six hundred acres; and when they went on it, thirteen years ago, not a tree had been cut He cleared a space for his house, and then moved in the next spring. He has proved the most successful cultivator of several kinds of fruit berries, and melons in this country. I saw one thousand hills of watermelons, on which will be ripe fruit by the 10th or 15th of June; he says he has frequently picked them weighing fifty pounds. His great peculiarity with strawberries is the quantity of fruit, its size, and flavor, and the constant bearing of the vines; always has plenty of fine berries for six months - frequenty eight - and last season he had them every month in the year. Recollect this is in the open air - in his open fields. I saw eight acres of strawberries; the vines are very small, and covered (the ground literally looks red) with must delicious Hovey berries. These vines have been in just as full bearing since the 10th of March, and he says will continue until the middle of September, and as much longer as frost keeps away, if he chooses to attend to them.

Mr. P. sends to this market from 150 to 200 quarts per day, and says he could pick double the quantity if the market was larger.' "

There are but two ways to have strawberries in constant bearing: one is, and the most practicable, to plant the Monthly Alpine, furnish them liberally with water in dry weather, with an occasional application of liquid manure, and yon can have fruit from June to October. Another way is, to have a stock of plants retarded by removing the blossom at the usual season, and bring them forward when the first crop is passed. This requires the exercise of much skill and a considerable amount of labor. We think there is a mistake in the above newspaper extract in regard to Hovey's Seedling bearing from the 10th of March until September.

Ravages Of The Curculio Prevented #1

The accompanying box will show evidence for itself, that I have for the second year, found means of arresting the fearfnl progress of the Curculio, which is by syringing the trees after the fall of the blossom., with a mixture of white-wash and flour of sulphur, in the proportion of 18 double handsfull of sulpher to a barrel of tolerably thick white-wash, made of unslaked lime. The sediment of this mixture will answer for a second and third barrel, merely filled with water, and well stirred.

I applied the above three times a week for four weeks, and have met with great success, having been obliged to prop the limbs to sustain the weight of the fruit.

These trees are ten )'ears old, and have blossomed every spring, but have never until last year, ripened any fruit.

The specimens I send you are Bolmar's Washington, and you will observe upon some of them, the marks of that little infamous Turk, which are nicely healed over, leaving the crescent to light up those who may have doubts that they are the production of a Curculio district. Syringe well, and although the fruit may be stung, it will come to perfection.

I am glad to find that Mr. Stokes has also been successful in raising this most delicious fruit, and his idea of coloring the whitewash is a good one, as it does away with the glaring effect given by the lime.

I have doubts of the practicability of using a rose upon the tin garden pump, as it will soon stop up with particles of lime, and become useless. I prefer the lip which generally comes with these pumps. This may be bent in .such a manner as to flatten the stream as it passes out the spout, and thus disperse it over the tree. I did not notice that any of the fruit withered or turned yellow, as spoken of by Mr. Stokes - of course there were some, as is the case in the best plum districts, that decayed and fell from the trees, making room for those that are left to have a chance to swell. Thos. W. Ludlow, Jr. Yonkers, Westchester Co , N. Y.