The list of pears is so good - unexceptionable, in fact - that I cannot add to it.

H. E. Hooker #1

This Society has heard, at a former meeting, a very elaborate report by Mr. H. N. Doolittle about the cultivation of the Improved Black Cap, and needs not that I should add to it I am persuaded, from my own experience in cultivation, that it is destined to be a very popular and a very useful fruit; there is scarcely any one of the small fruits which is so valuable, and the improved sort is larger and more productive than the wild one, and is eminently desirable; very good for table use, and for all cooking purposes, for jellies, tarts, pies, for drying - in short, for all the numerous purposes for which a house-keeper buys berries, this is unequaled. More of them could be sold in the market than could be sold of strawberries. It is a very handsome dish, no hulls to be picked out, no dirt to be washed off, and they have thus far brought a higher price than strawberries. Mr. H. considered it eminently profitable and worthy the attention of all fruit-growers. Should be planted in rows six or eight feet apart, (eight feet apart is best,) and the bushes three feet apart in the rows. First year do all the cultivation with a horse cultivator. The following spring tie the plants to a trellis or to a stake.

The canes of the second year make a growth of five or six or seven feet high, sometimes even eight or nine feet, but they ought in that case to be headed off at six feet high. To support these, form a wire trellis about four feet high.

Benj. Fish thought there was no necessity of the trellis spoken of by Mr. Hooker. Grow good strong canes, and in the spring these should be cut back to a point where they are stiff and will bear the weight of the fruit without support.

B. Hodge had some experience in the cultivation of the Black Cap Raspberry, and was satisfied that it is one of the best of the small fruits. The danger in cultivation was in their liability to get the plants too thick. Thought with Mr. Hooker that rows eight feet apart and plants three feet apart in the row was best. Would caution cultivators against a certain portion of the plants which are barren. These can be easily distinguished by an eye well versed in the matter, and they must be rooted out. After the fruit has been gathered in the autumn the old cane should be cut out, and it then gives a chance for the new plants to come up from the crown of the old. Agreed with Mr. Hooker that the trellis was the best plan for cultivating them. There seems to be a sad want of attention to this plant. The Chicago market has been supplied from Cincinnati and Kentucky, and we had even brought them to Buffalo from Cincinnati at $4 00 per bushel. In my estimation it is a very desirable fruit indeed, and immediately follows the strawberry.

Col. E. C. Frost had cultivated the Yellow Cap Raspberry for the last ten years, and thinks that it grows stronger and is really more productive than the Black Cap, and that the fruit is better flavored.