Carisbrooke, an agricultural village, once a thriving market town, of the isle of Wight, England, situated at the foot of a hill, near the. centre of the island, in a parish of its own name, 1 m. S. of Newport; pop. of the parish about 8,000. Under the independent lords of Wight it was the capital of the island, and afterward became the residence of the governor, who occupies a handsome mansion within the precincts of a ruined castle of great antiquity, crowning the hill back of the village. This castle is supposed to have been founded before the Roman invasion; was taken by Cerdic, the Saxon, in 530; enlarged by William Fitzos-borne, a relative of William the Conqueror, and first lord of Wight, in the 11th century; and after many additions completed in the time of Elizabeth, when it covered an area of 20 acres. It has a well 200 ft. deep. It was the place of confinement of Charles I. after his removal from Hampton Court, and a window is pointed out by which the royal captive made a fruitless attempt to escape. After his execution it became the prison of his two youngest children, the duke of Gloucester and the princess Elizabeth, the latter of whom died here. A ruined Cistercian priory, founded by Fitzosborne, occupies an eminence opposite the castle.

The priory church is now parochial, and the other remaining portions are occupied as sheds and stables. The village has an infant school and several chapels for dissenters. The parish contains infantry barracks, a house of, industry, a juvenile reformatory, and some corn mills on the Medina river.

Carisbrooke Castle.

Carisbrooke Castle.