Conwy, Or Aberconwy Conway, a market town of Carnarvonshire, N. Wales, on the left bank of the river Conway near its mouth in Beaumaris bay, 13 m. N. E. of Bangor, and 233 m. by the Northwestern and the Chester and Holyhead railways N. W. of London; pop. in 1871, 4,050. It has some ship-building yards, and exports timber, lead, and slates, but possesses little commercial importance. The harbor is nearly dry at low water. A suspension bridge 327 ft. long, begun in 1822 and finished by Telford in 1826, at a cost of about £40,000, connects the town with a rock in the stream, whence an embankment 2,015 ft. long and 30 ft. wide at the top, formed of mountain clay faced with stone, extends to the opposite bank. A tubular railway bridge of wrought iron was built here by Robert Stephenson in 1848; it is 400 ft. long and 18 ft. above high-water mark, and cost £110,000. The town is surrounded by an old wall with towers and battlements. The castle, founded by Edward I. in 1283, is one of the finest structures of the kind in Great Britain; its walls, overgrown with ivy, are from 12 to 15 ft. thick, and are surmounted by eight huge towers.

The remains of an old Cistercian priory, and the "great mansion," built in 1585, are also interesting objects.

Castle and Tubular Bridge.

Castle and Tubular Bridge.