"Good morning, Mr. Johnson, I'm Wilkins from the Herald - just dropped in to see about carrying your studio ad in our paper."

"I am afraid, Mr. Wilkins, that you come at a rather bad time, Christmas you know is our harvest time and now at the first of the year things are naturally quiet and I am sure the advertising wouldn't pay me. Well, Mr. Johnson, it's my business to sell advertising space in the Herald and I think with my experience in advertising I can convince you that your advertisement would pay. You see, I used to live in the west where they grow a sort of clover they call alfalfa.

Extra Crops StudioLightMagazine1910 14

1909 KODAK ADVERTISING CONTEST First Prize - Amateur Class By T. W.Kilmer

Before this alfalfa was introduced the ranchers were well content to harvest one crop of hay, but they found that with this new clover from two to four good crops could be raised every year provided the land was sufficiently irrigated. Now I think I can show you how you can grow this sort of business crop and the Herald will supply the advertising irrigation."

"Yes, but my dear Mr. Wilkins, our Christmas rush is due to the almost universal habit of giving remembrances to our friends at that season and usually just after Christmas the average American is in for a period of retrenchment."

"True enough, Mr. Johnson, but the money is still in existence, and it isn't lying idle in the banks either, it is in circulation just the same. Another thing, have you ever stopped to think how much actual cash is given as a Christmas remembrance every year, not from business firms to their employees, but from father to son, uncle to niece, or from prosperous Jim in the city to the old folks at home? None of this large amount can figure in anybody's holiday business, but in most cases it is "easy money" and just aching to be spent, and you can get your share of it. Every month in the year finds excuses for people to have their pictures taken.

Now I know you are an observing man, Mr. Johnson, and you see every big merchant taking advantage of the human love of

a bargain at this season of the year. Advertisements of special sales, per-inventory bargain days fill the pages of the Herald and the stores of the advertisers.

Now, of course, I don't know a whole lot about the picture making business, but it seems to me that between us we ought to be able to provide some enticing bargains - no, I don't mean cutting the price, but why can't you offer something that "looks a whole lot" but really costs you no more. Then on top of that you can suggest that now the holiday rush is over you have more time to devote to each individual patron - a better opportunity to bring out their individuality - the combination surely ought to catch them.

Hello! what's this - a mount uncatalogued - Tarbell, Looms & Company, who are they? - the best in the business? Well now you sit right down and hunt for those new things in mounts and I'll drop in this afternoon and help you fix up that copy. Yes, I'd use space at least twice every week - no, a single column six or seven inches deep will be enough. This afternoon about three. Good morning."

Eastman's Ground Glass Substitute invaluable in working up negatives. 4-ounce bottle, 50 cents.

Extra Crops StudioLightMagazine1910 15

1909 KODAK ADVERTISING CONTEST Second Prize - Amateur Class By George H. Seip

The Only Condition StudioLightMagazine1910 16

Now is a splendid time to have those pictures taken.The holiday rush is over, so we can take plenty of time to get acquainted and bring out your best points.Also - we have some interesting things in new style mountings.

The Pyro Studio

No. 140. Price, 40 cents.

BULLETIN: THE EASTMAN SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL PHOTOGRAPHY FOR 1910

Scranton, Pa. …............................... January 18, 19, 20

Boston, Mass. …............................... January 25, 26, 27

New York, N. Y. …...............................February 1, 2, 3

Philadelphia, Pa. …...............................February 8, 9, 10

Washington, D. C. …............................... February 15, l6, 17

Norfolk, Va…...............................February 22, 23, 24

Charlotte, N. C. …............................... March, 1, 2, 3

Jacksonville, Fla. …...............................March 8, 9, 10

Atlanta, Ga.…............................... March 15, l6, 17

Nashville, Tenn.…...............................March 22, 23, 24

New Orleans, La. …...............................March 29, 30, 31

Houston, Tex. …............................... April 5, 6, 7

Dallas, Tex.…...............................April 12, 13, 14

Oklahoma City, Okla. …...............................April 19, 20, 21

Little Rock, Ark.…............................... April 26, 27, 28

The Pyro Studio StudioLightMagazine1910 17

From An Aristo Platino Print By Jeannette Fleming Joplin, Mo.

The Pyro Studio StudioLightMagazine1910 18

Incorporating The Aristo Eagle Established 1901 The Artura Bulletin

Established 1906

Vol. 1 FEBRUARY 1910 No. 12

In the year 1901 the American Ariosto type Company issued the first number of the "Ariosto Eagle" devoted to the betterment of photography and treating on the manipulation of Ariosto Plating. Thus the "Ariosto Eagle" came into existence.

During the year 1906 the Arturo Photo Paper Company, wishing to contribute its share toward the advancement and progress of photography, and wishing to keep the photographer in touch with Arturo products, issued a monthly publication known as the "Arturo Bulletin."

The "Ariosto Eagle" represented the best in collision printing-out paper.

The " Arturo Bulletin" represented the best in gelatine developing-out paper.

The supremacy of both in their particular field has never been questioned.

During the spring of 1909 the editor of the " Ariosto Eagle" realizing that the Eastman Co. made many good things beside Ariosto, wished to exploit them.

This could not consistently be done under the title " Ariosto Eagle," and after deciding to broaden its scope the name was changed to "Studio Light and the Ariosto Eagle." This change enabled the staff of the publication to treat upon the merits of other Eastman products. Other Eastman products as valuable to the professional as the old, tried and true friend Ariosto.

In the meantime Arturo was finding a new paper field. Things progressed to a point where we saw that developing paper was a product which the photographer was taking up seriously. Not any and all developing papers, but just Arturo, which alone possesses all of the qualities needed by the professional.

In line with our policy of progressiveness the next step was to furnish Arturo to all photographers desiring the best in developing-out paper, and consequently Studio Light will in the future keep you in touch with Artura and will incorporate the "Arturo Bulletin" as well as the " Ariosto Eagle."