Maple Pop-Corn

3 quarts popped corn 1 cupful maple syrup

1/2 cupful granulated sugar

Boil the syrup and sugar together until it spins a long thread (218° F.). Pour onto the corn, stir well and cool.

Glace Nuts And Fruits

2 cupfuls sugar 1 cupful boiling water 1 teaspoonful cream of tartar

3 tablespoonfuls sugar Blanched nuts of any kind

Caramelize the three tablespoonfuls of sugar. Add the boiling water, and, when dissolved, the sugar and cream of tartar. Boil without stirring until the syrup is absolutely brittle when a little is dropped in cold water (310° F.) Remove the saucepan from the heat and place in a vessel of cold water to stop the boiling instantly. Then place over boiling water while dipping. Halves of walnuts and pecans or whole Brazil nut meats may be used, or peanuts or filberts may be dropped by the teaspoonful on a marble slab, or paraffine paper. The best utensil to use in dipping is a long sharp hat pin.

Canned pineapple, cherries and apricots, bits of figs, dates stuffed with fondant, Malaga grapes, strawberries and sections of seedless oranges may be dipped. In case juicy fruits are used, they must not be pricked while dipping as the juice will spoil the glace.

Old-Fashioned Jelly Wafers

1 1/2 cupfuls cooked sifted, dried apricots, apple pulp, prunes or plums

2 1/2 cupfuls sugar

2/3 cupful water

3 tablespoon fills granulated gelatine soaked in 1 cupful cold water

Flavoring

Boil the sugar and water together for five minutes, then add the fruit pulp and simmer until thick like marmalade. Add the soaked gelatine a little at a time until all is in, and let it boil up thoroughly all over. It will then leave the spoon in long strings. Cool the mixture and flavor. If apple pulp is used, half may be flavored with a half-cupful of minced mint leaves, or one teaspoonful of peppermint essence and colored pale green; the second half with rose and colored pink. In case apricots are used, flavor with lemon extract, while prunes need orange. Plums may have a little orange or lemon extract added to them.

Drop the mixture from a narrow spoon onto waxed paper in small rounds and let set over night. When quite stiff, press together in pairs, spread on waxed paper and let dry in a current of air for two hours. Then roll in granulated sugar and dry again. Dp not use for two days.

How To Salt Peanuts And Almonds

Use only raw peanuts. To blanch either peanuts or almonds, cover with cold water, bring to boiling point, let stand for a minute or two, drain and husk at once. Not more than half a pound should be blanched at a time. Dry for several hours on paper toweling. Heat olive oil, or any of the pure vegetable cooking fats, to the point where it will brown a bit of bread in forty counts. Cover the bottom of a frying basket with nuts, immerse them in the fat and remove them before they are quite brown enough; their own heat will finish the coloring. Spread on brown paper or paper toweling and dredge lightly with very fine table salt.