A variety of dishes can be made by a person who is familiar with the thickening power of flour and corn-starch and with methods of combining them into sauces. There are two foundation sauces:

A White Sauce is one made from milk or white stock or part of each, thickened with plain flour or corn-starch.

A Brown Sauce is one made from milk or water or brown stock and thickened with browned flour or part browned and part plain flour or corn-starch.

The following typical dishes have a sauce foundation:

Cheese Sauce - To each cup white sauce of desired consistency, add 1/4 cup shaved, grated or crumbled cheese and stir until cheese is melted.

Cream Soups, Purees and Bisques - To each cup of very thin or thin white sauce, add 2 cups of vegetable, meat or fish pulp.

Creamed Dishes - To each cup of medium or medium to thick white sauce, add 1 to 1 1/2 cups vegetables, meat, fish or hard-cooked eggs cut in pieces.

Scalloped Dishes - To each cup of medium to thick white sauce, add 1 to 2 cups cooked vegetables, meat, fish, hard-cooked eggs, cooked macaroni or rice; put into a baking dish, sprinkle with buttered crumbs and bake until brown.

Croquette MiXtures - The foundation of most croquettes is white sauce or brown sauce. When this type of croquette is made, to each cup of very thick sauce use 1 to 2 cups of finely divided cooked meat, fish, hard-cooked eggs or vegetables. When the mixture is cold, it will easily shape into croquettes.

Souffle Mixtures - Many souffles are made from a foundation of thick or very thick white sauce to which is added some seasoning or flavor such as cheese, vanilla, sugar, or some chopped food and raw egg-yolk. Beaten egg-white is folded in and the mixture is ready to pour into a baking-dish. All souffles are baked with the containing dish standing in hot water. With a knowledge of white sauce and egg cookery, souffles are very simple to make. No attempt is being made to give at this point complete directions for making souffles, but only to show how a knowledge of one part of cooking will help in the making of many dishes and will make the whole problem of cooking simpler and more interesting. The most common souffles having a white sauce foundation are:

Cheese Souffle - To each cup of thick to very thick white sauce, add 3/4 cup grated cheese, 2 egg-yolks and seasoning. Cook until the cheese is melted. Then fold in the beaten egg-whites, and the souffle is ready to bake.

Meat or Fish Souffle - To each cup thick to very thick white sauce add 1 cup minced meat or vegetable, 3 egg-yolks, and the beaten whites of 3 eggs and bake for thirty minutes at 375° F.

Chocolate Souffle - To each cup thick white sauce, add 2 ounces grated chocolate, 1/3 cup sugar, and 3 egg-yolks; cook until the chocolate is melted. Fold in the beaten whites of 3 eggs and bake for thirty minutes at 375° F.

Vanilla Souffle - To each cup very thick white sauce, add 1/3 cup sugar, 1/2 teaspoon vanilla, 2 to 3 egg-yolks. Fold in beaten whites of 2 to 3 eggs and bake for thirty minutes at 375° F.