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Catherine Owen's New Cook Book



Part 1. Culture And Cooking Or, Art In The Kitchen Part II. Practical Recipes

TitleCatherine Owen's New Cook Book
AuthorCatherine Owen
PublisherCassell Publishing Company
Year1885
Copyright1885, O. M. Dunham
AmazonCatherine Owen's New Cook Book
Catherine Owen's New Cook Book
-Preface To New Edition
In the first part of this book I endeavored to help inexperienced housekeepers in the difficulties they find in using even the best recipes without some knowledge of cooking. In response, however, to ...
-Preface
This is not a cookery book. It makes no attempt to replace a good one; it is rather an effort to fill up the gap between you and your household oracle, whether she be one of those exasperating old fri...
-A Few Preliminary Remarks
Alexandre Dumas, pere, after writing five hundred novels, says, I wish to close my literary career with a book on cooking. And in the hundred pages or so of preface - or perhaps overture would be...
-A Few Preliminary Remarks. Part 2
Thus it is, when I speak of good living, I do not mean expensive living or high living, but living so that the table may be as elegant as the dishes on which it is served. I believe there exists ...
-A Few Preliminary Remarks. Part 3
Brillat-Savarin, grave judge as he was, and abstemious eater, yet has written the book of books on the art of eating. It was he who said, Tell me what you eat, I will tell you what you are, as pregn...
-Chapter II. On Bread
Of all articles of food, bread is perhaps the one about which most has been written, most instruction given, and most failures made. Yet what adds more to the elegance of a table than exquisite bread ...
-Kreuznach Horns
Either take a third of the dough made for bread with three quarts of flour, or set a sponge with a pint of flour and a yeast-cake soaked in half a pint of warm water or milk, making it into a stif-fis...
-Brioche
I suppose the very name of this delectable French dainty will call up in the mind's eye of many who read this book that great little shop, Au Grand Brioche, on the Boulevarde Poissoniere, where, on ...
-Paris Jockey-Club Recipe For Brioche
Sift one pound of flour, take one fourth of it, and add rather more than half a cake of compressed yeast, dissolved in half a gill of warm water, make into a sponge with a very little more water, put ...
-Chapter III. Pastry
To make good puff paste is a thing many ladies are anxious to do, and in which they generally fail, and this not so much because they do not make it properly, as because they handle it badly. A lady w...
-Pastry Tablets
Cut strips of paste three inches and a half long, and an inch and a half wide, and as thick as a twenty-five cent piece ; lay on half of them a thin filmy layer of jam or marmalade, not jelly; then on...
-Frakgipane Tartlets
One quarter pint of cream, four yolks of eggs, two ounces of flour, three macaroons, four tablespoonfuls of powdered sugar, the peel of a grated lemon, and a little citron cut very fine, a little bran...
-Chapter IV. What To Have In Your Store-Room
One great trouble with many young housekeepers is betrayed by the common remark, Cookery books always require so many things that one never has in the house, and they coolly order you to 'moisten wit...
-Chapter V. Luncheon
Luncheon is usually, in this country, either a forlorn meal of cold meat or hash, or else a sort of early dinner, both of which are a mistake. If it is veritably luncheon, and not early dinner, it sho...
-Windsor Pie
Take slices of veal cutlet, half an inch thick, and very thin slices of lean boiled ham; put at the bottom of one of these veal-pie dishes or bakers, about two to three inches deep, a layer of the v...
-A New Mayonnaise (Soyer's)
Put a quarter of a pint of stiff veal jelly (that has been nicely flavored with vegetables) on ice in a bowl, whisking it till it is a white froth ; then add half a pint of salad oil and six spoonfuls...
-Potted Ham
Take any remains of ham you have, even fried, if of a nice quality, is good for the purpose ; take away all stringy parts, sinew, or gristle, put it in a slow oven with its weight of butter, let it st...
-Chapter VI. A Chapter On General Management In Very Small Families
A very small family, a young menage for instance, is very much more difficult to cater for without waste than a larger one; two people are so apt to get tired of anything, be it ever so good eating,...
-A Chapter On General Management In Very Small Families. Continued
Sunday Pot-au-feu and roast lamb, leg of mutton or other good joint, etc. Monday Rice or vermicelli soup made with remains of the bouillon from pot-au-feu. If the Sunday joint was a fore or h...
-Chapter VII. On Frying And Broiling
Frying is one of the operations in cookery in which there are more failures than any other, or, at least, there appear to be more, because the failure is always so very apparent. Nothing can make a di...
-Chapter VIII. Roasting
In spite of Brillat-Savarin's maxim that one may become a cook, but must be born a rotisseur, I am inclined to think one may also, by remembering one or two things, become a very good roaster (to tr...
-Chapter IX. Boiling
Boiling is one of the things about which cooks are. most careless; theoretically they almost always know meat should be slowly boiled, but their idea of slow is ruled by the fire; they never attempt...
-Soups
As I have before said, I do not pretend to give many recipes, only to tell you how to succeed with the recipes given in other books. I shall, therefore, only give one recipe which I know is a novelty ...
-Gouffe's Pot-Au-Feu
Four pounds of lean beef, six quarts of water, six ounces of carrot, six of turnip, six of onion, half an ounce of celery, one clove, salt. Put the meat on in cold water, and just before it comes t...
-Chapter X. Sauces
Talleyrand said England was a country with twenty-four religions and only one sauce. He might have said two sauces, and he would have been literally right as regards both England and America. Everythi...
-Chapter XI. Warming Over
Hash is a peculiarly American institution. In no other country is every remnant of cold meat turned into that one unvarying dish. What do I say ? remnants of cold meat ! rather joints of cold meat, a ...
-Bceuf A La Jardiniere
Put in a fireproof dish if you have it, or a thick saucepan, a pint of beef broth, a small bunch each of parsley, chervil, tarragon - very little of this - shallot or onion, capers, pickled gherkins, ...
-Beef Au Gratin
Cut a little fat bacon or pork very thin, sprinkle on it chopped parsley, onion, and mushrooms (mushroom powder will do) and bread-crumbs; then put in layers of beef, cut thick, and well and closely h...
-Pseudo Beefsteak
Cut cold boiled or roast beef in thick slices, broil slowly, lay in a hot dish in which you have a large spoonful of Montpellier butter melted, sprinkle a little mushroom powder if you desire, and gar...
-Cutlets A La Jardiniere
Trim some thick cutlets from a cold leg of mutton, or chops from the loin, dip them in frying batter, a la Careme, fry crisp and quickly, and serve wreathed round green peas, or a ragout made as follo...
-Miroton Of Beef
Peel and cut into thin slices two large onions, put them in a stew-pan with two ounces of butter, place it over a slow fire; stir the onions round till they are rather brown, but not in the least burn...
-Ragout
A very nice ragout may be made from cold meat thus: Slice the meat, put it in a stew-pan in which an onion, or several if you like them, has been sliced; squeeze half a lemon into it, or a dessert-spo...
-How To Warm A Good-Sized Piece Of Beef
Trim it as much like a thick fillet as you can; cut it horizontally half way through, then scoop out as much as you can of the meat from the inside of each piece. Chop the meat fine that you have thus...
-How To Warm Over Cold Mutton
An excellent and simple way is to cut it, if loin, into chops, or leg, into thick collops, and dip each into egg well beaten with a tablespoonful of milk, then in fine bread-crumbs and fry in plenty o...
-Deviled Meat
Our better halves are usually fond of this, especially for breakfast or lunch. For this dish take a pair of turkey or chicken drumsticks or some nice thick wedges of underdone beef or mutton, score...
-Soyer's Fritadella (Twenty Recipes In One)
Put half a pound of bread-crumb to soak in a pint of cold water; take the same quantity of any kind of roast, or boiled meat, with a little fat, chop it fine, press the bread in a clean cloth to extra...
-Chapter XII. On Friandises
Le role du gourmand finit avec l'entremets, et celui du friand commence au dessert. - Grimod de la Reyniere. American ladies, as a rule, excel in cake making and preserving, and I feel that on tha...
-Iced Souffle A La Byron
One pint of sugar syrup of 32 degrees (get this at a druggist's if you do not understand sugar boiling), three gills of strained raspberry juice, one lemon, one gill of maraschino, fifteen yolks of eg...
-Biscuit Glace A La Chaeles Dickens
One pint of syrup (32 Degree), fifteen yolks of eggs, three gills of peach pulp, colored pink with cochineal, one gill of noyeau, half a pint of thick cream, and a little chocolate water-ice, made wit...
-Biscuit Glace A La Thackeray
One pint of syrup (32 Degree), one pint of strawberry pulp, fifteen yolks of eggs, one ounce of vanilla sugar (flavor a little sugar with vanilla), half a pint of thick cream. Mix syrup, yolks, str...
-Baba
One pound of flour; take one quarter of it, and make a sponge with half an ounce of compressed yeast and a little warm water, set it to rise, make a hole in the rest of the flour, add to it ten ounces...
-Maraschino
Bruise slightly a dozen cherry kernels, put them in a deep jar with the outer rind of three oranges and two lemons, cover with two quarts of gin, then add syrup and leave it a fortnight, as for curaco...
-Noyeau
Blanch and pound two pounds of bitter almonds, or four of peach kernels; put to them a gallon of spirit or brandy, two pounds of white sugar candy - or sugar will do - a grated nutmeg, and a pod of va...
-Chapter XIII. French Candy At Home
This chapter I shall have to make one of recipes chiefly, for it treats of a branch of cooking not usually found in cookery books, or at least there is seldom anything on the art of confectionery beyo...
-Tutti Frutti Candy
Chop some almonds, citron, a few currants, and seedless raisins; work into some fondant, flavor with rum and lemon, thus making Ro-man punch, or with vanilla or raspberry; press into the French Candy ...
-Fondant Panache
Take your fondant, divide it in three equal parts, color one pink and flavor as you choose, leave the other white and flavor also as you please; but it must agree with the pink, and both must agree wi...
-Cream Walnuts
Make ready some almonds, some walnuts in halves, some hazelnuts, or anything of the sort you fancy; let them be very dry. Take fondant made from a pound of sugar, set it in a bowl in a saucepan of boi...
-Punch Drops
Sift some powdered sugar. Have ready some fine white gum-arabic, put a tablespoonful with the sugar (say half a pound of sugar), and make it into a firm paste; if too wet, add more sugar, flavor with ...
-How To Make Cochineal Coloring Which Is Quite Harmless
Take one ounce of powdered cochineal, one ounce of cream of tartar, two drachms of alum, half a pint of water; boil the cochineal, water, and cream of tartar till reduced to one half, then add the alu...
-Chapter XIV. A Chapter For People Of Very Small Means
I am sorry to say in these days this chapter may appeal to many, who are yet not to be called poor people, who may have been well-to-do and only suffering from the pressure of the times, and for who...
-Ragout Of Cucumber And Onions
Fry equal quantities of large cucumbers and onions in slices until they are a nice brown. The cucumber will brown more easily if cut up and put to drain some time before using; then flour each slice. ...
-Onion Soup
Fry six large onions cut into slices with a quarter of a pound of butter till they are of a bright brown, then well mix in a tablespoonful of flour, and pour on them rather more than a quart of water....
-Pea Soup
Steep some yellow split peas all night, next morning set them on to boil with two quarts of water to a pint of peas; in the water put a tiny bit of soda. In another pot put a large carrot, a turnip, a...
-Chapter XV. A Few Things It Is Well To Remember
Every housekeeper has pet wrinkles of her own which she thinks are especially valuable; some are known to all the world, others are new to many. So it may be with mine; but, on the chance that some...
-Chapter XVI. On Some Table Prejudices
Many people have strong prejudices against certain things which they have never even tasted, or which they do frequently take and like as a part of something else, without knowing it. How common it is...
-Chapter XVII. A Chapter Of Odds And Ends
I have alluded, in an earlier chapter, to the fact that many inexperienced cooks are afraid of altering recipes; a few words on this subject may not be out of place. As a rule, a recipe should be fait...
-A Chapter Of Odds And Ends. Continued
There is always a great deal of talk about servants in America, how bad and inefficient they are, how badly they contrast with those of England. Certainly, they are not so efficient as those of the ol...
-Chapter XVIII. Breakfast Breads
Although breads were very fully treated of in the first part of this book, a few breakfast and tea-cakes more quickly made may not be out of place. ...
-Soufflee Bolls
Melt a tablespoonful of butter in half a pint of milk; when blood-warm put in half a cake of compressed yeast, a beaten egg, two teaspoonfuls of sugar and a saltspoonful of salt. When the yeast is dis...
-Scotch Scones
Dissolve half a saltspoonful of soda and two ounces of butter or lard in a gill of warmed sour milk; put ten ounces of flour and a little salt in a bowl; pour the mixture in and make it into a stiff d...
-Corn Bread
One quart of milk, three eggs, two cups of Indian meal, three cups of flour, one teaspoonful of soda, two of cream of tartar, lard half the size of an egg, one level teaspoon of salt; mix Indian meal ...
-Corn Muffins
One cup of corn-meal, one of flour, a dessert-spoonful of butter, two eggs, two small teaspoonfuls of baking-powder, one tablespoonful of sugar. Mix flour and meal and sugar with enough milk to mak...
-Egg Biscuits
Sift with one pint of flour one teaspoonful of baking-powder; chop into it a tablespoonful of butter till fine; beat one egg and mix it with half a cup of milk - part cream is much better; make a hole...
-Batter Bread
Two eggs, the whites beaten separately, a small cup of flour, the same of milk; mix yolks, flour and milk into a smooth batter; stir in a tablespoonful of butter melted and a little salt; then add the...
-English Muffins
Dissolve a yeast-cake (compressed) in a pint of warm water, with a teaspoonful of salt; mix with as much warmed flour as will make a very thick batter - just as thick as can be stirred without being d...
-Quick Biscuit
Chop a tablespoonful of butter or lard in two heaping cups of flour in which you have sifted a teaspoonful of baking-powder, and half one of salt; wet with milk or water enough to make a soft dough th...
-Buttermilk Puffs
To a quart of sharp buttermilk put half a teaspoonful of baking-soda; taste; if not sweet add a little more; stir into it a teaspoonful of salt, one of sugar, and enough flour to make a thick batter t...
-Chapter XIX. Omelettes. French Omelette
Break four eggs; beat them, but not very much, just so that you can take them up without strings; put a piece of butter in a very clean smooth frying-pan and let it get hot but not burn; put a saltspo...
-Tomato Omelette
(Two Wats). Make some good tomato sauce - see recipe - very hot, pour it in the dish round the omelette. Or, Make some stewed tomato hot; lay two table-spoonfuls of it on the omelette before you...
-Oyster Omelette
Fricassee some oysters as for oyster patties; lay them on the omelette before folding it. ...
-Mushroom Omelette
Use stewed mushrooms as directed for oysters and tomatoes. ...
-Ham Omelette
May have a little cooked ham chopped and put in before frying, or delicately shaved cold ham may be made hot and laid between the omelette. In short, there are innumerable ways of varying omelettes...
-Chapter XX. General Instructions. Caramel For Coloring
Put four tablespoonfuls of sugar in a small thick saucepan, with two tablespoonfuls of water; let them boil ten minutes over a quick fire; then watch it till it colors golden; it will soon go from thi...
-Bouquet Of Sweet Herbs
Tie together two sprigs of parsley, one of thyme, one bay leaf, wrapping them round so that they will not shed, and be easy to take out of the gravy or soup. ...
-How To Chop Herbs
Always use the leaves only, never the stems; gather the leaves firmly between the thumb and three fingers of the left hand; let a sharp knife shave them through as you push them forward under it; turn...
-Fried Parsley
The whole secret is in having fresh curled parsley, bright in color, and perfectly dry. It is better not washed; therefore never use any but the cleanest. Have the fat in the frying-kettle hot enough ...
-Larding - Daubing
Larding is a process that requires practice, when it is very easy; it means to take a stitch in the surface of meat, and is really more ornamental than anything else. For purposes of moistening and fl...
-How To Crumb
Where you have not a large quantity of ready dried and sifted bread-crumbs it is better to use the cracker powder that comes in boxes. It is just as economical to turn out a whole box when you are cru...
-Chapter XXI. Forcemeats. - Stuffing. Forcemeats
Many people believe they don't like dishes flavored with herbs; yet they dine and enjoy dinner where herbs are properly used, and never know the dish they enjoyed owed its piquancy to their despised ...
-Chestnut Forcemeat
Peel some Spanish chestnuts; scald them a few minutes to get off the inner skin; drain them and stew them till tender in gravy; let them get cold and pound them with an equal quantity of butter and br...
-Oyster Forcemeat
Take two dozen plump oysters, scald them, chop them a little; take an equal quantity of bread-crumbs and two ounces of butter; scald a bit of onion as large as a hazel-nut, and chop it very fine; put ...
-Sage And Onion Forcemeat
for ducks, pork and goose. Boil some white onions till half done; chop them fine; put as much bread-crumbs as there is chopped onion, and to about a pint of stuffing put about ten sage-leaves, drie...
-Ordinary Veal-Stuffing (Soyer's)
Chop up half a pound of beef suet very fine (I substitute butter - four ounces); put it in a bowl with eight ounces of bread-crumbs, two tablespoonfuls of finely-chopped parsley, two teaspoonfuls of e...
-How To Stuff
In stuffing any bird, fish, or piece of meat, avoid packing it tightly - there must be room for the stuffing to swell; beside, the stuffing should be well permeated with the gravy of the article. Turk...
-How To Blanch
French cooks mean by this term to pour boiling water on any article and then to put it immediately in cold water. With almonds it means scalding them to take off the skin. ...
-Chapter XXII. Vegetables. To Boil Vegetables
There is not much to add to what has been said in the chapter on boiling, in the first part of this book. Multiplying recipes is not adding to information; nothing is more generally spoilt than vegeta...
-How To Cut Vegetables
Peel turnips thick; scrape carrots or peel them very thin, and cut them into slices the third of an inch thick; make three slices in a pile, and cut them across. ...
-How To Cut And Shred Vegetables
Prepare them as directed; cut carrots, turnips, (or onions) in slices the third of an inch thick; then make them into piles, three slices in a pile, and cut down through them every third of an inch, p...
-How To Shred For Soup
Cut the slices much thinner; five or six to the inch; hold them in little piles firmly between the left thumb and fingers, and cut across each pile evenly, making about six cuts to the inch; with a li...
-Preparation Of Vegetables
Cauliflower - Should have nearly all the green leaves trimmed off, leaving only one circle of the young green; lay in cold water to cover them, in which is a large handful of salt, Then rinse out of t...
-String Beans
To look well, these should be most carefully cut slant-wise, in thin uniform slices; or if very young, slit them the whole length, and cut across twice to make slips an inch long, like those that come...
-Cones Of Carrot And Turnips
A more ornamental way is to boil them in quarters; chop them fine in a chopping-bowl; put a piece of butter with them and press them into a cone shape (a conical wineglass will answer for a mould), an...
-Stewed Tomatoes
Scald them to remove the skin; cut them up; put them in a saucepan, and let them stew down slowly till they are thick from one to two hours; put in a lump of butter, pepper and salt, and a teaspoonful...
-Baked Tomatoes
Scald them; skin them; cut a hole in the top and put in it a little knob of butter in which you have worked a quarter saltspoonful of salt and a little pepper; set them in a dripping-pan; put in it bu...
-Stewed Onions
Take care that the onions are carefully peeled; it is better to take off a skin too much than leave one that will shrivel; choose them of medium size; let them boil quite tender in well salted water -...
-Chapter XXIII. Soups. Clear Soup
For beef stock, for all clear soups, I can do no better than refer to the minute directions for the making of Gouffe's Pot-au-feu, given on page 68. That stock, carefully prepared, clear as follows : ...
-Vermicelli Soup
To one quart of clear soup or bouillon, add two ounces of vermicelli; boil gently ten minutes and serve. ...
-Clear Vegetable Soup
Shred half a small carrot, half a small turnip, about an inch of young leek or half a dozen very small spring onions, if in season; also a few green peas or string beans if young; boil all together ti...
-Consommee A La Royale
For two quarts of con-sommee, take the yolks of two eggs and one gill of the consommee; beat the eggs; mix with the gill of consommee; put as much grated nutmeg as will lie on the point of a penknife ...
-Plain Family Soup
Put two pounds of meat, with any bones or trimming you have - remnants of cold meat or gravy helps to enrich it - in a pot with three quarts of cold water; let them come slowly to a boil, and then sim...
-English Clear Mock Turtle
This soup, as made by the English, is much richer than what is usually known in this country by the name. I give the best English method. Though more expensive it is not more troublesome than the more...
-Thick Mock Turtle
To make Thick Mock Turtle, proceed exactly as before; only instead of using clear stock, any stock made from bones and scraps will do; it will, of course, need no clearing; thicken with brown thickeni...
-Mock Turtle Soup
A fine American recipe. - Pre-pare a calf's head as already directed, saving tongue and brains, Lay in the bottom of the pot a carrot, a turnip, a small head of celery, three small onions, two large s...
-Egg Balls For Soups
Boil three eggs hard; pound the yolks, adding a small teaspoonful of very finely chopped parsley, half a saltspoonful of fine salt, a quarter one of white pepper; moisten with raw yolk, and roll each ...
-Mulligatawny Soup
This rich soup is best made with the excellent but despised rabbit. A fowl, how-ever, can be substituted. Take a small knuckle of veal, say three pounds, and one rabbit or fowl; if rabbit, lay it i...
-Fish Soups. French Fisherman's Soup
Put a quarter pound of butter in a stewpan; when melted, add six ounces of flour; stir well together over a slow fire a few minutes; when cool, add a quart of milk and two quarts of stock; stir over t...
-Bisque Of Oysters
Put the liquor from one quart of oysters into a quart measure, filling it up with water; strain this into a large saucepan; lay aside half of the oysters, chop up the rest quite small, and put them to...
-Bisque Of Lobster
Take the meat from a fine boiled lobster, taking care to discard the spongy part, called ladies' fingers; also the sand-bag from the head and the entrail that runs through the body; carefully save t...
-White Soups
Stock for White Soup. Four pounds of knuckle of veal, one carrot, one turnip, two onions - all these of a fair size, about five ounces in weight of each vegetable - one bay-leaf, one clove, one saltsp...
-White Mushroom Soup
One quart of stock, one quart of milk, one gill of thick cream, half a can of mushrooms and the liquor, two ounces of butter, two ounces of flour, one teaspoon of salt. Put both stock and milk to boil...
-White Asparagus Soup
Cut the points from a bundle of asparagus; lay them aside; cut up the rest of the rods quite small; if very hard you may bruise them; put them into a quart and half-pint of stock, and boil slowly till...
-Cream Soups
Under this name inexpensive easy soups are made without stock; they are very good, but of course lack the flavor of soups made with stock. ...
-Cream Of Cauliflower
Boil the white part of a small cauliflower twenty minutes in salted water. Put one quart of milk to boil; melt in a saucepan one ounce of butter and one ounce flour till they bubble, stirring thorough...
-Green Pea Soup
Shell half a peck of young peas; throw them into water. Put all the shells to boil in two quarts of any kind of stock, with four sprigs of parsley, six young onions, twelve mint leaves, and a handful ...
-Iced Claret Soup For Hot Weather
This is a Danish soup, but very welcome in summer in this climate. Boil two ounces of sago in a pint of water until it is like thick mucilage; add to it a bottle of claret (with a little grated nut...
-Chapter XXIV. Fish. Salmon With Green Dutch Sauce
Take a piece of salmon two inches in thickness, if for a small family; put it on a plate, tie it in a napkin and put both in a saucepan of boiling water in which is plenty of salt - four teaspoonfuls ...
-Broiled Salmon, Caper Sauce
The steaks should be an inch thick; dip each piece in flour, put it on a hot greased gridiron, turn it often for fifteen minutes, when it should be of a fine pale brown. Serve caper sauce (see recipe)...
-Crimped Cod Masked With Oyster Sauce
Take two or three pounds of codfish - crimped, if possible - lay on a plate set on a napkin; tie up the four corners, and put it into as much boiling water as will cover it, with one level tablespoonf...
-Halibut With Caper Sauce
Take a fine thick piece of halibut, unless you have a fish-boiler and strainer, put it on a plate, tie it in a napkin, place it in boiling water with a level tablespoon-ful of vinegar and one of salt ...
-Filet De Sole En Bechamel
Bone two flounders (see Filet de Sole, page 57); put the bones and trimmings into a pint of water, with a half slice of onion and sprig of parsley; let them stew-down to half pint, strain, and put asi...
-Baked Bluefish
This fish should be used very fresh. Choose one of fair size; wash it clean, taking care no slime or dark matter adheres to the inside. To remove it use your forefinger and some salt; wipe it dry, and...
-Stewed Carp
Cleanse carefully; lay the fish in a stew-pan with just enough broth of any kind to cover it and a tea-spoonful of sweet herbs; stew very gently; when done take up the fish and strain the liquor; seas...
-Fried Smelts
Choose them of an even size; wash them, wipe them dry, dip them in milk, then in flour. Beat up an egg with a tablespoonful of cold water; dip each fish, after shaking off superfluous flour, in the eg...
-Fish, Au Gratin
This is a French mode of cooking fish very nice, and to those who use mushrooms frequently, not expensive, as they may probably have to open a can for another purpose. Chop up one or two good-sized...
-Baked Black Fish - An Epicure's Dish
Take a black fish of five pounds, cleanse and dry it thoroughly, flour it slightly, score the sides; put some sweet lard or beef dripping in a pan, and brown the fish on the top of the stove; pour off...
-Chapter XXV. Entrees
Any small, dainty dish is proper for an entree, from minced veal or beef, which is only glorified hash (see chapter on warming over), to salmon or game cut-lets. As a rule, I think an entree should...
-Calf's Head, Hollandaise Sauce
If you have made mock-turtle soup, you may have some of the meat remaining; simmer the pieces in enough of the soup, or some stock, to make them hot through; lay them in a dish (see recipe) and cover ...
-Calf's Tongue Stewed
Cut little fillets of salt pork; sprinkle them with a mixture of parsley, very finely-chopped chives (or onion), salt, and pepper; trim the tongue; parboil it to take off the skin; then lard it with t...
-Calf's Brains, Au Beurre Noir
Soak the brains in one tablespoonful of vinegar and one quart of water; carefully remove all the fibrous skin that surrounds them without breaking them; put them in boiling water well salted, and with...
-Fried Sweetbreads
When they come from the butcher they should be put immediately into salt and water to take out any dark blood; leave them an hour, then parboil them for ten minutes, drain them, and drop them into co...
-Sweetbreads Stewed With Mushrooms
Prepare a pair of sweetbreads by parboiling and skinning (see last recipe), then lard them all over the top; lay some slices of fat pork in a stewpan, also a teaspoon-ful of chopped onion, two of carr...
-Veal Cutlets
Take the cutlets from the middle of the leg; let them be cut an inch thick; divide into small shapely pieces; pound each piece with a rolling-pin till they are half an inch thick; squeeze a few drops ...
-Mutton Or Lamb Chops Breaded
These must be nicely trimmed, only about the third of an inch of fat left on the outside; and, if they are loin chops, the soft flap end turned round, horseshoe fashion; if rib chops, cut an inch and ...
-Chicken Croquettes
Take the flesh of half a chicken, or rather more than half a box of boned chicken (I find for croquettes the boned chicken quite as good, and a great saving of work); chop the chicken, and with it hal...
-Chicken Rissoles
Make the same mixture as for croquettes; indeed, in cold weather and when only a small dish of croquettes is required, a part of the mixture can be kept for two or three days, by covering it with butt...
-Chicken Fritters
This is again the same mixture as for croquettes and rissoles, but the fritter is a delicious variety. Make some thick frying-batter (see recipe); make the chicken mixture into balls the size of a wal...
-Kromesquies Of Chicken
Are the same as rissoles, only instead of the minced chicken being enveloped in paste, very thin slices of fat pork are used, fastened with wooden toothpicks, and they are then crumbed and fried. They...
-Variations On The Four Foregoing Recipes
Turkey, veal, or beef may be used for any of these four dishes, instead of the chicken. A little onion or ham, or any flavoring preferred, may be substituted for the mushrooms or oysters, although not...
-Chicken Fricassee
Prepare a chicken as directed (see preparation of poultry). Cut each leg and wing in two at the joint; cut the back in two; the stomach makes one piece. With the gizzard and neck there should be thirt...
-Fricassee Of Veal
Is made in the same way, but is improved by forcemeat balls, poached (see recipe), and laid round. ...
-Salmi Of Duck Or Game
Strictly speaking, a salmi differs from warmed-over duck or game, because the birds are only supposed to be half cooked on purpose for it, But, as a matter of fact, an excellent salmi can be prepar...
-Salmi Sauce
The sauce made as above is called by professional cooks Salmi Sauce; it is not troublesome to make, and is equally good for warming over slices of cold beef or mutton. stick one of the small lobs...
-Rough Puff Paste
(South Kensington School of Cookery.) This pastry will serve for most purposes for which puff paste is used; it is better than most home-made puff paste, and takes no longer to make than common sho...
-Patty Cases
Take some rough puff paste; roll it a third of an inch thick, not less; have a medium-sized biscuit cutter and . one quite small, about the size of a silver dollar; cut out three times as many rounds ...
-Lobster Patties
Pick out the firm white flesh of a hen lobster; cut it into small dice. Put a large teaspoonful of flour and two of butter into a saucepan on the stove; let them bubble; pour to it a gill of cream or ...
-Oyster Patties
Take a dozen and a half Blue Points; scald them in their own liquor, being careful they do not remain in it a moment after it boils; take them out; cut each oyster into four pieces, if they are large;...
-Clam Patties
These are so very good that I think if they were better known they would meet with favor. Take small clams; scald them in their own liquor; take out the hard part, and proceed exactly as for oyster...
-Chicken Patties
Take the white meat of a chicken; cut it (not chop it) into small dice; take the chicken bones and trimmings, if you have no stock ready; pound them well; put them into a pint of water with an ounce o...
-Dresden Patties
These cases are no trouble at all to an expert in frying, and are elegant and economical. Take stale baker's bread cut in thick slices; with a biscuit cutter of medium size cut rounds two inches th...
-A Few Old-Fashioned Plain Dishes. Irish Stew
Cut half a dozen lean chops from the neck of mutton; flour them and lay them in a saucepan or stewpan with two onions cut in slices, and a teaspoonful of butter; put them over a quick fire and let all...
-Haricot Of Mutton
(Simple). Take some nice rib chops; trim off all but very little fat; flour them, lay them in a stewpan and brown them well and quickly, taking care that they do not burn; cut up a carrot and a tur...
-Stewed Beefsteak
Take two pounds of round steak; cut in pieces the size to serve; flour them, and sprinkle with pepper and salt; lay them in a stewpan with two dessert-spoonfuls of vinegar, and cover closely; place th...
-Sea Pie
This old-fashioned English dish is very good in winter. Take two pounds of meat; if you buy it on purpose, use part lean mutton and part beef, or beef, mutton, and veal; although mutton or beef alo...
-Chapter XXVI. Roasts. Roast Beef
Very full directions are given in Chapter VIII (Roasting) for roasting of all kinds. Yet to save referring back, I repeat the recipes, remarking that if you roast one thing well, and know why you do i...
-Fillet Of Beef
Trim it very carefully; remove the gristly skin from it, if the butcher has not done so; this must be carefully done not to disfigure the fillet; round off the ends and any superfluous fat; in short, ...
-Roast Leg Of Mutton
Rub the skin of a leg of mutton with salt (from the skin there is no gravy to draw out); flour it lightly; set it in a dripping-pan without water, and put it in a hot oven; an hour and a half will coo...
-Boast Saddle Of Mutton
Have the saddle neatly trimmed and superfluous fat removed; skin it and skewer the skin over it till it is nearly done. Set it in the oven one hour and a half before it is wanted, if it weighs abou...
-Roast Lamb
Lamb requires to be very thoroughly cooked. A leg of lamb is roasted exactly as a leg of mutton. One weighing four to five pounds will take an hour and half. Serve with mint sauce (see recipe). ...
-Roast Fillet Of Veal
No meat requires more careful cooking than roast veal. Any meat more insipid than plain unsavory veal is not to be imagined. The less condiment there is about roast beef or mutton the better, but veal...
-Roast Fillet Of Veal With Mushrooms Or Oysters
Prepare a fillet as in the last recipe, only do not remove the bone in the centre; roast in the same way. While it is cooking take a dozen large oysters, or more if small, scald them in their own liqu...
-Boast Veal And Macaroni
(An Italian Dish). Prepare a fillet or shoulder of veal as directed, but without pork; set it in the oven. Boil some macaroni, broken into six-inch lengths, till tender. When the veal is within hal...
-Stuffed Roast Shoulder Of Veal
Get the butcher to bone the shoulder; cut off the knuckle part and use it for stock with the bones (when you have meat boned take care to have the bones sent home); fill the cavity where the blade bon...
-Roast Loin Of Veal
Make a pocket with your finger between the skin and flesh of the veal and insert the forcemeat, or slices of fat pork if preferred; skewer it securely, flour it, put buttered paper over the kidney, an...
-Roast Loin Of Pork
Select quite young pork with very small bones, the middle of the loin is the best part; if lean enough for the rind to be left on, score it thoroughly, for the sake of the carver, but not too deeply; ...
-Chapter XXVII. Poultry. Preparation Of Poultry
Chickens, ducks, capons and turkeys should be killed at least twenty-four hours before cooking; the following directions as to cleansing and preparing apply to all kinds of poultry. When well picke...
-How To Truss And Stuff Chicken Or Turkey
For roasting, twist the pinions under the wing to the back, push up the legs till they lie flat against the side of the bird and the lower joints are even with the rump; pass a skewer through the cen...
-Roast Chicken
Flour it, set it in a dripping-pan with a few slices of fat pork laid on the breast, or else put a few pieces of butter on it. If you do not use the pork, put an ounce of butter in a wooden spoon, pre...
-Roast Fowl
If the fowl is over a year old, wrap it in two coats of soft paper after it is prepared as above; set it in the oven, allowing an hour and a half in a good oven; when it has been in an hour, take off ...
-Fowl Braised
Loosely fill a nice fowl with forcemeat; put it in a stewpan with a pint of broth, two glasses of white wine, an onion stuck with two cloves, a piece of carrot to make half a cup when cut up, a blade ...
-Roast Turkey
Except in point of time, follow the directions for roasting chicken. For stuffing, see directions for trussing and stuffing turkey. On account of the length of time it requires to be in the oven, a tu...
-Braised Turkey
Turkey braised, the Lord be praised, is part of an old saying which at all events testifies to the estimation in which our forefathers held this mode of preparing the savory bird. Cover the turke...
-Boiled Turkey
Prepare a turkey as directed. In trussing turkey for boiling, the legs are pushed up, a slit cut in each side, and the legs drawn into the body; it is correct to stuff the breast for roasting, but for...
-Roast Duck Or Goose
Clean a duck as directed for fowls; twist the pinions round on the back; it is correct English fashion to leave the feet on; scald them, and twist them up against the back. If you prefer them off, how...
-Roast Capon
Follow the directions for roast turkey. If wanted for a company dinner, it may be stuffed with chestnut force-meat (see recipe), and served on a bed of watercresses. ...
-Chapter XXVIII. Game
As much as the French excel the English in soups and all made dishes, so do the latter excel them in roasts and game. The English rule for game is to leave the natural flavor unimpaired; therefore ...
-Roast Grouse, Prairie Hen, Or Partridge
Clean as directed for poultry in general. If you wish to serve these birds English fashion, instead of cutting the head off, make a slit to take out the crop, and twist the head round and bring it und...
-Broiled Prairie Hen, Or Partridge
Clean and prepare as directed. Split the back of the bird, butter it all over, place it on a hot gridiron and turn several times to prevent burning. It will take, on a good fire, fifteen to twenty min...
-Boast Quails
These, being birds of white flesh, are unlike most game, which is better kept long after killing, and should be cooked very fresh. Clean the birds; roll each in a thin slice of salt pork, tying it on ...
-Broiled Quails
Cook exactly the same as partridge, only of course they require much less time to cook, ten minutes usually suffices; serve on toast, with watercresses round the dish. ...
-Small Birds, Snipe, Woodcock, Etc
Leave on the head and neck, carefully picked free of feathers; twist the head, and use the beaks of snipe and woodcock as a skewer to secure the legs, running it through the body; wrap each one in bac...
-A Quick Way To Cook Small Birds
Prepare them as usual; dip each bird in flour and shake them; sprinkle with salt. Have a kettle with smoking lard; try it with a piece of bread, if it colors brown in one-half minute it is ready, if n...
-Roast Venison
Trim neatly a well-hung haunch of venison, scraping off all dark skin and dried surface; wipe thoroughly, and if it is getting high let the cloths be dipped in vinegar; cover the haunch with a thic...
-Venison Cutlets Or Steaks
Cut cutlets or steaks an inch thick, trim neatly, but take away no fat; pepper and salt them; broil them on a hot gridiron over a clear, gentle fire; turn often, they will take twenty minutes; send st...
-Chapter XXIX. Salads
Although there are many salads of different names, there are but two dressings in ordinary use : the simple French dressing, suitable for any salad where there is no meat used, and mayonnaise. There a...
-Lettuce Salad
This is best prepared on the table, as it should be eaten soon after it is made. The lettuce should be carefully washed and dried. Hold over the bowl a salad-spoon, into which put a saltspoonful of...
-Anchovy Salad
Wash six anchovies; let them lie in water an hour; remove the bones, also heads, fins and tails; put them on a dish with two lettuces, a teaspoonful of chopped parsley, and a sliced lemon; pour over t...
-Cardinal Salad
Take two or three heads of very white celery, using only the best part; cut them of even lengths; place them on a flat dish, arranging them like a bundle of asparagus, taking care that some of the del...
-Asparagus Salad
Take cold asparagus that has been boiled twenty minutes - that is till tender, but not in a mush; color some mayonnaise, green, either with spinach (see Spinach Coloring) or juice of bruised parsley. ...
-Chicken Salad
(Soyer's) If you can make a good mayonnaise, chicken salad is very easy to make, yet seldom well made. Cut up the chickens quite small, make a plain French dressing (three tablespoonfuls of oil to ...
-Lobster Salad
Take a live hen lobster, plunge its head downwards in boiling water; this kills it instantly; be sure the water is salt enough; two large tablespoonfuls to the gallon of water is not too much; boil it...
-Potato Salad
Boil the potatoes in their shins till tender but not broken; peal and slice them while warm; let them get cold but not ice cold; chop a teaspoonful of onion or olives very fine; throw it over them and...
-Potato Mayonnaise
Boil potatoes in their skins, peel and slice them as above. Make may on naise sauce, chop a small onion very fine indeed, mix it with the mayonnaise, and dress the potatoes with it; garnish with tufts...
-Breakfast Salad
(Murrey) Scald two ripe tomatoes, take off the skin, put them into cold water or on ice; drain and either slice them, or cut them into sections as you would divide an orange; peel and slice very th...
-Tomato Salad
Scald and skin fine ripe tomatoes; cut them either in slices or in sections parallel to the core, leaving the hard core out; set them on the ice till very cold; pour over them either a mayonnaise or a...
-Chapter XXX. Boiled Puddings Of All Kinds
They must be put in boiling water and brought back to the boiling point as quickly as possible; not allowed to boil again, just whenever is most convenient; steeping a pudding in non-boiling water rui...
-English Apple, Or Other Fruit Pudding
The English use a beef-suet crust where Americans use a biscuit crust, and as it is both more wholesome and more nutritious, I give the recipe hoping that those who shudder at the idea of suet pastry ...
-Fruit Batter Pudding
Make a batter with four eggs, and a pint of flour and a pinch of salt, using as much milk as will make a rather thick batter; stir in as many raspberries or cherries as you can, with half a cupful of ...
-Albert Pudding
Beat six ounces of butter to a cream; then gradually add to it five well-beaten eggs and half a pound of flour, six ounces of loaf-sugar, the rind of a lemon grated; add half a pound of stoned raisins...
-Lemon Pudding
Twelve ounces of bread-crumbs, six ounces of finely-chopped beef suet, four ounces of flour, four ounces of sugar, the grated peel and juice of two small lemons, four eggs; mix all together, and then ...
-Polka Pudding
Boil one quart of milk; mix four tablespoonfuls of cornstarch with a little cold milk, and pour the boiling milk on to it, stirring all the time; let it thicken over the fire; then add two tablespoonf...
-Queen Mab Pudding
Steep six bitter almonds bruised, and the peel of a lemon (pared very thin) in a pint of milk on the stove, at almost boiling point, until the flavor is well drawn out; add one ounce of gelatine and a...
-Trot Pudding
This is an excellent plain pudding; one cup of chopped and seeded raisins, one cup of suet finely chopped, one cup of molasses, one cup of milk, three eggs, three cups of flour, one teaspoonful of sod...
-English Christmas Puddings
There are many good recipes differing very little from each other, any one of which would make as good a pudding as usually met with in old England, but it requires more than a good recipe to turn o...
-Christmas Pudding
Christmas Pudding, No. 1 One pound of currants thoroughly cleaned, one pound of raisins, stoned and chopped a little, one pound of suet finely chopped, half a pound of brown sugar, four ounces of b...
-How To Mix Plum Pudding
Throw each ingredient as you prepare it into a pan; sprinkle the salt over all, then add the beaten eggs, the brandy, and when milk is used, put that last, as it is only when the eggs and brandy are i...
-Chapter XXXI. Pies And Tarts
In making either the American pie, or the English tart, remember to heap the fruit in the centre, leaving room for a groove round the edge. Before the cover is put on wet the margin, but do not press ...
-Flaky Crust For Family Pies
South Kensington Training School of Cookery. Put one pound of flour in a bowl, mix with it a teaspoon-ful of baking powder, whip the whites of two eggs to a stiff foam, put them to the flour with a...
-English Fruit Tarts
These are made in oval deep dishes, with crust only lining the sides, not the bottom, giving more fruit and juice, and are preferred by those who do not like the heavy undercrust. ...
-Currant And Raspberry Tarts
Cut long strips of rough puff paste (see recipe) an inch and half to two inches wide, wet the sides of an oval dish, lay the paste round, pressing the sides not the edges - fill with three parts ras...
-Cherry And Currant Tart
Use three parts cherries and one of currants, unless you have regular cooking cherries, when the currants may not be necessary, make the tart according to directions for raspberry and currant tart. ...
-Blackberry Tart
Blackberry tarts or pies are greatly improved by having one-third apple added to them. Make as directed for other fruit tarts. Apple and all fruit tarts are made in the same way. 2 10 Practical ...
-Apple Pie
Make some rough puff paste (see recipe); roll half of it thin; line a pie-plate; peel and cut up some fine baking apples; fill the pie (see Chapter III (Pastry)). Grate the rind of a lemon or some n...
-Lemon Pie
Lemon Pie, No. 1 Beat two ounces of butter to a cream, if very salt wash it first, mix with it four ounces of sugar, a cup of bread-crumbs and the yolks of three eggs and one white, the grated rind...
-Cocoanut Pie
Cocoanut Pie, No. 1 Line a dish with rough puff paste, pour a pint of hot milk (not boiling) over two well beaten eggs; set the bowl containing the mixture in boiling water, stir it till thick, the...
-Sweet Patties
Take a pound of fine puff or rough puff paste; roll it the third of an inch thick, and cut with a biscuit cutter three rounds; put one on the other; then with a smaller biscuit cutter dipped in flour ...
-Frangipani Cream Patties
Prepare the pastry shells as directed; take off the centre piece, which is the cover; scoop out the soft inside, leaving half an inch of crust, and fill with Fran-gipani cream, made as follows : On...
-Tartlets
As these need not rise so much, you can use the trimmings from patties to make them. Roll the paste quite thin; double it without rolling it again, and cover patty pans with it, pressing the bottom as...
-Omelette Soufflee
(Jules Gouffe.) The whites of six eggs beaten very stiff; the yolks of three beaten four minutes, with three tablespoonfuls of sugar powdered, and one teaspoonful of vanilla extract or the powdere...
-Soufflee A La Vanille
(J. Gouffe.) Put in a three-quart saucepan one quart of milk, keeping little of it out to mix with six ounces of flour; when smooth stir the flour into the milk; keep on stirring till it boils, whe...
-Flaming Omelette
Break six eggs; beat the whites and yolks separately; add to the yolks one tablespoonful of powdered sugar; stir whites and yolks lightly together; put butter the size of an egg in a clean frying-pan,...
-Chapter XXXII. Dishes For Cheese Course, Or For Supper. Cheese Fondue
Put in a small saucepan one tablespoonful of butter, one of flour; stir over the fire till they bubble; then add a gill of milk or cream (so far this is only very thick white sauce); stir to prevent b...
-Raminoles
(Soyer). Melt one tablespoonful of butter; add one of floor; stir over the fire till they bubble; add half a cup of water, stir in four ounces of cheese grated; stir till smooth; remove from the fi...
-Ramaquins
Crumble a slice of stale baker's bread; cover it with a breakfast cup of boiling milk; let it soak a quarter of an hour in a hot place; then strain off the milk but don't press it; beat it smooth; sti...
-Cheese Straws
Make some puff paste or rough puff; roll it out as thick as a silver dollar; cut it in strips an inch and a half wide and four inches long; lay a little rich grated cheese along the centre of half t...
-Cheese Canopees
Cut some stale baker's bread into slices half an inch thick; if you have a half-moon shaped cutter, cut them into crescents with it, if not divide into diamonds or any shape you please; fry these a ve...
-Cheese Fritters
This will do to use up cheese that has become a little dry, although, of course, fresh would be better. Put in a chopping bowl or mortar three ounces of grated cheese, a dessert-spoonful of finely cho...
-Chapter XXXIII. Sauces, Savory. English Bread Sauce
The English serve bread sauce with most kinds of game, also with roast chicken and turkey. Take two ounces of bread-crumbs; be careful there is no crust as the sauce must be very white; put them in...
-A Simple And Quick Brown Sauce
Cut up an onion, put it in a saucepan with a tea-spoonful of butter, fry it brown; put in two cloves, a stick of celery, or six celery seeds, a bouquet of herbs, and a teaspoonful of gelatine; boil al...
-Bordelaise
(Gouffe) Put half a pint of Sauterne wine in a saucepan, boil it down to one gill; put a tablespoonful of chopped shallot blanched (see directions), or onion (a poor substitute), one pinch of peppe...
-Sauce Piquante
(Simplified From Gouffe) Fry or stew half an ounce of shallot or onion chopped, in a dessert-spoonful of vinegar; let it cook until the vinegar is all absorbed - be very careful about this; then pu...
-Sauce Poivrade
Dissolve two ounces of butter in a saucepan; a carrot, a turnip, an onion cut in two, also, if to be had, a shallot and two cloves, a sprig of thyme, one of parsley, a bay leaf, a little salt, and two...
-Sauce Robert
Fry in a small saucepan three medium-sized onions, chopped fine, in a tablespoonful of butter; stir them as they fry, till they are clear and brownish; add to them half a pint of brown sauce and a win...
-Beurre Noir, Or Brown Butter
Put two ounces of butter in a small saucepan; let it get brown, but not burn; when it is a good color let it cool slightly; then pour in a tablespoonful of vinegar which you have made hot but not boil...
-Brown Thickening
Under the name of Roux this is given on page 34. White thickening (Blanc) is on the same page. ...
-Mint Sauce For Roast Lamb
One tablespoonful of mint leaves, very finely chopped; three tablespoonfuls of vinegar - if very strong, use one-third water, and a dessert-spoonful of sugar; mix two or three hours before using it. ...
-Brown Mushroom Sauce
Add to half a pint of brown sauce the liquor from a can of mushrooms and half of the mushrooms; stew five minutes. It is much improved by a glass of sherry, in which case the sauce must be allowed to ...
-Tomato Sauce
(Blot) Put in a stew-pan two ounces of butter, half a bay leaf, two peppercorns, a sprig of thyme, an onion cut up, a sprig of parsley, a dozen medium-sized tomatoes, and two wineglasses of broth o...
-White Sauces
When sauces are thickened with eggs, it is safer after they are added to stand the saucepan in another containing boiling water, and stir it in that, until it reaches the boiling point; remember it mu...
-Butter Sauce
Is the foundation for several well-known white French sauces. It will be observed that the first step is always the same - equal proportions of butter and flour stirred together over the fire until th...
-Allemande Sauce
One ounce of butter put in a thick saucepan; when melted add one ounce of flour, stir them, let them bubble one minute; then pour in - stirring all the while - half a pint of hot broth or white stock,...
-Sauce Supreme
Make an Allemande as above; add to it two table-spoonfuls of butter and three of stock; stir, and bring it to the boiling point at once; squeeze in a few drops of lemon juice; use at once. ...
-Poulette
Make Allemande sauce and add to it a glass of white wine. If anything is to be cooked in it, as sweetbreads or chicken, leave out the eggs till last: they are sometimes omitted altogether. ...
-Caper Sauce
To half a pint of butter sauce put a aessert-spoonful of capers - not chopped, it spoils the appearance - and a teaspoonful of the vinegar, a saltspoonful of salt, and a quarter one of pepper (white)....
-Bechamel
Bechamel No. 1 One ounce of butter put in a thick saucepan to melt; add one ounce of flour, let them bubble a minute, stirring all the time; pour to it half a pint of hot strained white stock which...
-Oyster Sauces
White Oyster Sauce Open two dozen oysters, carefully preserve the liquor; stir one ounce of butter and one ounce of flour together over the fire until they bubble; pour the strained oyster liquor i...
-Soubise Or Onion Sauce
Boil medium sized onions tender, chop them up quickly, put them into cold water while you make half a pint of white sauce, then put a half saltspoonful of white pepper in it; drain the onions, add the...
-Hollandaise Sauce
(Gouffe) Put in a saucepan two tablespoonfuls of vinegar, with a saltspoonful of salt, and half one of pepper (white), let it boil down to one dessert-spoonful. Take it from the fire, add two table...
-Dutch Or Hollandaise Sauce
(Simple) Make half a pint of butter sauce as directed, then stir in gradually the beaten yolks of three eggs and two tablespoonfuls of oil, putting it in drop by drop just as you would for mayonnai...
-Green Dutch Sauce
Is simply Hollandaise sauce with sufficient parsley juice to color it green. Pound the leaves of fresh pars-ley and squeeze the juice through muslin. Stir it into the sauce the last thing. ...
-Mayonnaise
Stir the yolk of one egg in a bowl for one minute, then add oil drop by drop, stirring all the time; when once the oil and egg have thickened, and taken an opaque creamy consistency, the oil may be pu...
-Tartar Sauce
Tartar Sauce, No. 1 Make some mayonnaise, put into a bowl a tea-spoonful of dry mustard, mix with a tablespoonful of the mayonnaise till smooth. Add a tablespoonful of finely chopped shallots, a te...
-Sweet Sauces. Almond Sauce
Take two ounces of almond paste, boil half a pint of rich milk, pour a little on the almond paste at first, to soften and moisten it. When it is well mixed with the back of a fork, pour on the rest of...
-Hard Sauce
Wash half a cup of butter till the salt is nearly all out of it; then beat it, gradually adding a cup of powdered sugar; and the beaten white of one egg; when it is all very light and white, flavor ei...
-Lemon Sauce
(New York Cooking School) One cup of sugar, half a cup of water, the rind (pared off very thinly) of two lemons, with the strained juice; boil all together ten minutes; beat the yolk of three eggs....
-Chandot. Careme's Celebrated Pudding Sauce
Mix half a pint of sherry, with four ounces of sugar and two eggs well beaten in a bowl, which set in a saucepan of boiling water; beat rapidly with an egg-beater till thick and smooth. ...
-English Brandy Sauce For Plum Puddings
A tablespoonful of butter stirred in a saucepan over the fire, with two teaspoonfuls of flour, till they bubble. Stir into them a gill of water and half a gill of brandy. ...
-Polka Sauce
Beat three ounces of butter, with a cup of powdered sugar, till they are very light and foamy; set the bowl in boiling water, make three glasses of sherry hot, add it gradually to the butter and sugar...
-Vanilla Sauce
Quarter of a cup of butter, a cup of water, and one of sugar, boil together; remove from the fire, have two eggs well beaten, pour the hot mixture to them and then stir together over the fire till thi...
-Fruit Sauce
Sauce from fresh fruit is made by stewing the fruit, cherries, raspberries, etc., in an equal quantity of water and half a pint of sugar to each pint of water; when very tender, pulp through a straine...
-Chapter XXXIV. Cakes. Sponge Jelly Cake
Beat three whole eggs ten minutes by the clock, with a cup of sugar; they should then look like thick cream beaten, a full cup of flour, and a teaspoonful of baking powder; spread on tins, and bake fi...
-Cup Cake
Beat a cup of butter, or one-half lard, to a cream,with two cups of sugar. Grate in the peel of a lemon, beat the yolks of three eggs, stir them in, then sift in three cups of flour, using just milk e...
-Fruit Cup Cake
Make by above recipe, only have ready a cup of fruit, currants and citron or anything you like, well floured and made quite warm. Add them last, just stirring them in, and get the cake into the oven q...
-Sponge Cake
Beat the whites of five eggs till they are solid, add the yolks to them, stirring very gently; grate the rind of a small lemon and squeeze in the juice of half. Sift in eight ounces of powdered sugar,...
-Pound Cake
(Very Rich). One pound of butter washed in rose-water if you want it very nice; beat it to a cream with the yolks of eight eggs and a pound of sugar, add a glass of wine and one of brandy, with a t...
-Fruit Pound Cake
Make by foregoing recipe; but prepare a pound of very well cleaned and dried fruit, shake two tablespoon-fuls of flour through it, then sift out all that does not adhere. Make the fruit very warm a...
-Plain Icing
Mix a pound of powdered sugar with the whites of two eggs, the juice of half a lemon, a dessert-spoonful of rose-water. Simply stir till smooth, and spread over the cake with a knife dipped in cold wa...
-Fondant Icing
This has taken the place of the old-fashioned frosting except for plum or pound cake. To make it, see Fondant, in the first part of this book, page 92. Melt the fondant by standing the bowl containi...







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