I. The S. E. County Of Vermont

The S. E. County Of Vermont, bordering on Massachusetts, and separated from New Hampshire by the Connecticut river; area, 780 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 26,036. The surface is generally hilly, and in the W. part mountainous, and the soil is fertile. Granite of an exoellent quality is very abundant. It is traversed by the Vermont Central and Connecticut River railroads. The chief productions in 1870 were 4,230 bushels of wheat, 185,675 of Indian corn, 163,122 of oats, 12,688 of barley, 353,836 of potatoes, 1,045,473 lbs. of butter, 92,095 of cheese, 233,772 of wool, 988,444 of maple sugar, 72,630 of tobacco, and 83,306 tons of hay. There were 4,818 horses, 6,685 milch cows, 13,266 other cattle, 42,440 sheep, and 3,946 swine. The whole number of manufactories was 278, having an aggregate capital of $1,413,452; value of products, $2,310,842. The most important were 2 of boots and shoes, 4 of children's carriages and sleds, 20 of carriages and wagons, 17 of furniture, 2 of hardware, 8 of machinery, 1 of organs, 2 of wrapping paper, 4 of woollens, 11 flour mills, 9 tanneries, 4 currying establishments, and 20 saw mills.

Capital, Fayetteville.

II. The N. E. County Of Connecticut

The N. E. County Of Connecticut, bordering on Rhode Island and Massachusetts, and drained by the Quinebaug, Willimantic, Shetucket, and Natchaug rivers; area, 620 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 38,518. The surface is very much broken, and the soil along the streams is highly fertile, but poor in other parts. It is intersected by the Norwich and Worcester, the Hartford, Providence, and Fishkill, the New London Northern, and the New York and New England railroads. The chief productions in 1870 were 16,094 bushels of rye, 161,414 of Indian corn, 167,574 of oats, 22,109 of buckwheat, 297,431 of potatoes, 517,509 lbs. of butter, 375,696 of cheese, 36,526 of wool, 5,685 of tobacco, and 58,734 tons of hay. There were 3,238 horses, 10,064 milch cows, 11,018 other cattle, 10,176 sheep, and 5,978 swine. The whole number of manufactories was 424, having an aggregate capital of $7,996,259; value of products, $11,028,056. The most important were 3 of acids, 13 of boots and shoes, 5 of bricks, 14 of carriages and wagons, 13 of clothing, 35 of cotton goods, 1 of glass ware, 2 of iron castings, 13 of machinery, 3 of paper, 3 of shoddy, 3 of sewing silk and twist, 14 of woollens, 24 flour mills, and 22 saw mills.

Capital, Brooklyn.