Chatsworth, a celebrated estate in the parish of Edensor, Derbyshire, England. A branch of the London and Northwestern railway leads from Manchester to Whaley bridge, and a coach from the latter place to Chats-worth. The place may also be reached by an omnibus from Rowsley, the terminus of a branch of the Midland railway, which leaves from Ambergate. Chatsworth was among the domains given by William the Conqueror to William Peveril, his natural son. In the reign of Elizabeth it was purchased by Sir William Cavendish, who began to build a mansion here, which after his death was completed by his widow, the countess of Shrewsbury. The present building was nearly completed by the first duke of Devonshire, 1688-1706; a new wing was built by the sixth duke (died 1858), who greatly added to the beauty of the establishment. Chatsworth gardens are among the most famous in England. The grand conservatory is 300 ft. long, 145 ft. broad, and 65 ft. high, comprising an area of about an acre, with a carriage road in the centre. The great glass house of the Victoria regia lily was erected under the direction of Sir Joseph Paxton, the designer of the London crystal palace. The park is about 9 m. in circumference, and diversified with hill and dale.

South and southwest of the mansion are remarkable water works. The mansion, about 180 ft. square, is built around an open quadrangular court. The terraces in front are 1,200 ft. long. The state rooms, 190 ft. long, are full of paintings, carvings, and tapestries; the south galleries contain more than 1,000 drawings by foreign masters, and cabinet pictures. The principal works of art are sculptures by Thorvvaldsen, Canova, Chantrey, and Westmacott, and paintings by Titian, Rembrandt, Murillo, and Landseer. Chatsworth house was for 13 years the prison of Mary Stuart. Hobbes also spent some time here. A "Handbook of Chatsworth and Hard-wick" was published in 1846, by the then duke of Devonshire.

Chatsworth.

Chatsworth.