Yellow. - The Shaggy Spunk, or Boletus hirsutus, a species of Mushroom, has lately been recommended to public attention by M. Lasteyrie, who has extracted from it a lively and durable yellow dye. This vegetable grows chiefly on walnut and apple-trees : it is replete with colouring matter, that may be expressed by pounding the mushroom in a mortar; after which the liquor, thus obtained, is boiled for about a quarter of an hour. An ounce of the fluid is sufficient to impart tinging matter to 61bs. of water. When the liquor has been strained, the silk, cotton, etc. intended for dyeing, must be immersed in it, and boiled for about 15 minutes.

M. Lasteyrie observes, that every kind of stuff retains this colour ; though it will be most brilliant on silk ; being less bright on linen and cotton. He adds, that if the former, after being dyed, be passed through soft soap-water, it will acquire a bright golden-yellow tinge, equal in point of lustre to that of the silk used for imitating embroidery in gold ; and which has hitherto been imported into Europe from China, at a great expence. Lastly, the yellow extracted from this plant, may be usefully employed for painting both in water-colours and in oil.

The increase of Plantations, in soils properly adapted for the purpose, being an object of national importance, we have subjoined a Tablet the design of which is, to shew the number of plants that may be set on an acre of land, both according to the Scotch and English admeasurement, at the distance of from one foot to 30 feet from each other. - Thus, the scale from 1 foot to 3 feet gives the number of cabbages, which may be planted on an acre, for the feeding of cattle ; while the distance from 3 to 6 feet, determines the amount of young forest or timber-trees, that may be arranged on a similar extent of ground ; the space of from 6 to 20 feet, shews those remaining after the first, second, or third cuttings ; and the interval from 20 to 30 feet, points out the fruit-trees, which may be planted on one acre.

Another object, which may tend to render the following Table more interesting to the planter, is that of ascertaining the difference between the Scotch and English acres. Hence, the first numbers in the second and fifth Columns represent the square feet contained. In those respective measures : so that the English acre is to that computed in Scotland, as 43, 560 is to 54, 760 feet.

The difference between the Scotch and English acres