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The Golf Swing, The Ernest Jones Method | by Daryn Hammond



The view of the golf swing expressed in this book forms the subject of a series of articles contributed by Mr. Daryn Hammond to Golf Illustrated of America.

TitleThe Golf Swing, The Ernest Jones Method
AuthorDaryn Hammond
PublisherChatto & Windus
Year1920
Copyright1920, Chatto & Windus
AmazonThe golf swing, the Ernest Jones method
-I. Foreword
What is wrong with the teaching of golf? asks a writer in the Daily Express. That there is something wrong with it, he goes on, is realized by all people who attempt to play golf, and by all tho...
-I. Foreword. Continued
On the whole the writer emerged a better man for this cold-douche treatment, and he was given a handicap of 18. He then began to read every article and book on golf in the English language, and so gr...
-Chapter I. The Mental Picture
It will have been gathered from the preceding chapter that in this exposition of the golf swing the writer's aim is not to decide such points as whether in the up-swing the shoulders move before, at t...
-Chapter II. The Grip
The view that the execution of the golf swing depends on hand and finger action brings out emphatically the immense importance of the grip. The grip is seen to be at the root of the matter; for clearl...
-Chapter III. The Swing. The Waggle
Having satisfied himself that he knows exactly how the club should be gripped, the player should practise the movement, preliminary to the swing, inelegantly described as the waggle. Much is to be g...
-The Quarter-Swing
It is best to begin by making quite short shots with an iron club - a mid-iron or a mashie: what is known as a quarter-swing or a half-swing (Figs. 24, 25, 27, and 28). It is this movement which forms...
-Slow-Back
The principle of slow-back which is dinned into the ears of every beginner is practised by no first-class golfer. The beginner is led to believe that some subtle magic resides in the process, and he p...
-The Down-Swing
One of the most vital moments in the golf swing occurs just before the up-swing is completed. Even the player who has begun to realize the importance of persistently moving the club-head with the hand...
-Head-Lifting
Even the resolution to glue the eyes to the ball is an irrelevance. If the player has the hitting idea immovably in his mind, he is sure to look at the ball; the player only fails to look at the ball ...
-Letting The Club-Head Do It
The idea so often put forward of letting the club do the work is misconceived and misleading. The club-head will certainly not do the work if the golfer is anything like so passive towards it. The gol...
-Approach Shots
The significance of the clear mental picture is perhaps most apparent in the approach shot. Where the exact length of the shot can be measured, and where the character of the shot is determined by the...
-The Run-Up
In order to produce this shot the golfer is usually instructed to turn over the right hand on, or immediately after, hitting the ball. If, however, the player concentrates on this turning over of the ...
-Chapter IV. The Action Of The Wrist
I I draw it (the club) back close to the ground with my wrists. ... I turn the face away from the ball with my wrists. This turning of the wrists* imparts greater speed to the club-head, and is the ...
-The Action Of The Wrist. Continued
* Quite so. It is very hard, because the feeling which should be the central feature of good golf action is not wrist action, but hand and finger action. Figs. 39 and 40. - Two other movements of...
-Chapter V. The Balance Of The Body
In the composition of the golfer the two elements, balance of body and balance of mind are intimately correlated, and from observation one would conclude that neither is easy to maintain. To some exte...
-Chapter VI. Stance
The text-books on golf all devote considerable space to the subject of stance. Most of them give a dissertation on the rival types of stance, the square and the open, and adjudicate on their merit...
-Stance. Continued
In the case of the low shot against the wind, it is clear that, as the club-head goes through ' the ball, it must be descending and tending to keep to the turf as long as possible. In swinging the cl...
-Chapter VII. Over-Swinging
It is the custom to speak of any movement which allows the club-shaft in the up-swing to pass appreciably beyond the horizontal position as over-swinging. It does not matter how this position is achie...
-Chapter VIII. Socketing
It is one of the many ironies of golf that some of its maladies beset the mature player almost equally with the novice; and of these maladies socketing is perhaps the chief. Not even players of the fi...
-Socketing. Continued
Fig. 59. - Note the delicacy and freedom of the finish of this iron shot. Nearly all the textbooks and nearly all the teachers make a fetish of the essential difference between the iron shot (ordinar...
-Chapter IX. Some Other Enormities. Sclaffing And Digging
Sclaffing and digging differ from most faults in that the player is conscious of them before the ball is hit away. In both cases the club-head meets the ground before it reaches the ball; but though t...
-Chapter X. Recapitulatory
General The Responsive Movements It is one of the misfortunes of golf that the correct playing of the shot should make a pretty picture; the observer - and the player as well - is apt to become too ...
-Some Further Notes
Methods. I (i) In the ideal swing the hands and fingers force the pace all the time, and other members of the body and the body itself respond: they do no less; they do no more. (ii) In the normal s...







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