Where Edinburgh Art Students Study - Curriculum and Fees - The Royal Scottish Academy

School of Painting - Advantages Offered to Students - The Glasgow School of Art - Its History How it Trains its Students - Prizes, Scholarships, and Bursaries

The Edinburgh College of Art occupies its own fine buildings in Lauriston Place, one of the most central positions of the city. It was established in 1908 by the Town Council of Edinburgh to serve as a central institution for art education in Edinburgh and the south-east of Scotland, under the directorship of W. F. Morley Fletcher. The distinguished teaching staff includes Mr. Robert J. Burns. A.r.s.a., Mr. Percy Portsmouth, A.r.s.a., Mr. John Watson, F.r.i.b.a., Mr. William Blake, and Miss Kathleen Burns.

How to Become a Student

The work of the Royal Institution School of Art, which was formerly carried on by the Board of Manufactures, and of the art department of the Heriot-watt College were taken over in the same year and incorporated with the college, which now also accommodates the Royal Scottish Academy School of Painting.

This last named carries on the work done by the members of the Royal Scottish Academy in their life class, since 1858, and continues to provide special facilities for advanced study from the life for their own students of painting, besides forming a postgraduate course for the students of the college who have taken the painting diploma.

The college provides for the study and teaching of the fine arts, and of the decorative arts and crafts, and its teaching is arranged in four main sections - painting, sculpture, architecture, and design.

The day classes of the college are open to men and women students above the age of sixteen, and the evening classes to those over fifteen.

Intending students at the day classes are required, before admission, to consult the director, and either to submit work showing ability to profit by the proposed course of study or to undergo an entrance examination at the college.

Students intending to join the evening classes are required to consult the superintendent of evening classes before admission.

Fees

Fees may be paid by the term or, at a reduced rate, by the session (three terms), beginning in October. Students who need financial aid to enable them to pursue their studies should make application to the clerk of the district committee of the county in which they reside.

The table of fees is as follows:

Covering fee, admitting to all instruction given in the college (diploma course), 3 a term, and 6 a session (three terms).

Fees for other courses are:

Per Term

Per Session

S.

d.

S.

d.

Five days a week

3

0

0

..

6

0

0

Four " "

2

10

0

..

5

0

0

Three " "

2

0

0

..

4

0

0

Two " "

I

10

0

..

3

0

0

One " "

I

0

0

..

2

0

0

Fees for any single class :

One day a week

I

0

0

..

2

0

0

Students joining at the half term will be charged half the terminal fee, but a full terminal fee will be charged to all students joining at the beginning of a term.

Fee for morning course in architecture, including attendance for study in two other subjects on two evenings a week 2 10s. a session.

Fee for each course of lectures on the history of architecture, 5s.

Students of the college of art are allowed to attend the lectures of the professor of fine art at the Edinburgh University during any single term on payment of the class fee and an entrance fee of 5s., in lieu of matriculation. The class fee for the course is 4 4s. for the session, or 2 2s. for one term.

For evening classes, the covering fee, admitting to all instruction in evening classes, is 5s. the term, and 10s. the session.

Students may join at the half-term at half fees.

Terms And Vacations

The session consists of three terms, in each year, of from twelve to thirteen weeks each. During term time the college is open from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m., and on Saturdays, from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m.

The long summer holiday, which is of so much value for outdoor work, lasts from the end of June to the beginning of October. There are short holidays at Christmas and Easter; the studios and work-rooms being, however, open and available for students wishing to work there in vacation during the time that the college office is open.

No fewer than 884 day and evening students were enrolled at the college last year, of whom 312 were women.

Certain prizes are awarded to students by the board of management, and a certain number of student teachers are appointed annually, who, in return for remission of fees and a maintenance allowance while continuing to study in the college, give assistance in teaching when required.

There are also certain funds for the provision of scholarships in the hands of the committees for secondary education throughout Scotland, to whom application may be made for bursaries to be held at the College of Art; and a scheme of college scholarships, including minor travelling scholarships and maintenance bursaries, and travelling scholarships for students who have taken the college diploma, is at present being adjusted with the Scotch Education Department.

The General Syllabus

The general syllabus includes:

Drawing and Painting: Elementary drawing, figure study from life and from the antique, anatomy, perspective, and geometry, elementary painting, studies of materials and their uses, still life painting from life, composition, history.

Sculpture: Elementary modelling, modelling from life and from the antique, anatomy, design, and composition in relation to architecture, casting, pointing and carving, history and technique.

Architecture: Practical draughtsmanship, study of historic styles and principles. colour, modelling, figure drawing, perspective and sciography, design, history.

Design: Elementary principles of construction, study of historic styles, practical designing for crafts and industrial purposes, interior decoration, furniture design.

Crafts: Writing and illumination, embroidery, stained glass, wood carving, plaster work, silversmithing, repousse and chasing, bookbinding and leather tooling.