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The Young Housekeeper's Friend | by M. H. Cornelius



In preparing this little volume, my aim has been to furnish to young housekeepers the best aid that a book can give in the departments of which it treats. Directions here given are designed to be so minute, and of so practical a character, that the observance of them shall prevent very many of the perplexities which most young people suffer during their first years of married life.

TitleThe Young Housekeeper's Friend
AuthorM. H. Cornelius
PublisherThompson, Brown, & Co
Year1873
Copyright1871, M. H. Cornelius
AmazonThe Young Housekeeper's Friend
The Young Housekeeper's Friend

Revised And Enlarged.

-Preface
In preparing this little volume, my aim has been to furnish to young housekeepers the best aid that a book can give in the departments of which it treats. No printed guide can perfectly supply the pla...
-Preface To The Revised And Enlarged Edition
In offering to the public a new edition of The Young Housekeeper's Friend, I wish gratefully to acknowledge the 'favor with which it has been regarded during the twenty-five years since its first pu...
-The Young Housekeeper's Friend. Counsels And Suggestions
Good housekeeping compatible with intellectual culture. - Persevering attention rewarded. - Effects of unhealthy diet. - Responsibleness of women. - Application of the principles of religion to the du...
-The Young Housekeeper's Friend. Counsels And Suggestions. Part 2
Like the paintings of the old artists, the beauty of this exquisite picture is enhanced by the softened hue of years, and like them it must be studied long ere its finest touches will be revealed. F...
-The Young Housekeeper's Friend. Counsels And Suggestions. Part 3
Never treat the subject of having company as if it were a great affair. Your doing this will excite your domestics, and lead them to imagine the addition to their usual work much greater than it is; y...
-The Young Housekeeper's Friend. Counsels And Suggestions. Part 4
Learn so to systematize your concerns, that each day of the week shall have its appropriate work, and every domestic know, without being prompted, what she is to do on that day. Observe whether all do...
-Ovens, Bread, Etc. Ovens - And How To Heat Them
Stoves and cooking-ranges have so generally taken the place of brick ovens, that the following directions, which were appropriate when this book was first published, will seldom be of use now. Yet, as...
-Directions Respecting Bread
There is no one thing upon which health and comfort in a family so much depend as bread. With good bread the coarsest fare is tolerable; without it, the most luxurious table is not comfortable. * T...
-Directions On Yeast
Good yeast is indispensable to good bread. Many of the compounds sold for yeast are unfit for use. The best kinds are dry yeast, soft hop yeast, and potato yeast. The hard yeast should be made in t...
-How To Make Soft Hop Yeast
To three pints of water put a small handful of hops, or if they are in compact pound papers, as put up by the Shakers, half a handful; boil them about half an hour. If the water wastes, add more. Put ...
-How To Make Dry Yeast
Put four ounces of hops to six quarts of water; boil it away to three quarts. Strain, boiling hot (as directed for the Soft yeast) upon three pints of flour, a large spoonful of ginger, and another of...
-How To Make Maine Potato Yeast
Pare, and cut in several pieces, three large Jackson White potatoes. Remove all dark specks. Boil in a quart of water. Keep a nice porcelain-lined or tin sauce-pan for this purpose. When the potatoes ...
-How To Make Bread
Potato Bread Boil four large, white potatoes (pared) in two quarts of water. When soft, take them from the water, and.mash smooth in a bread-pan; add salt and a large tablespoonful of beef-shorteni...
-How To Make Rice Bread
Allow half a pint of ground rice to a quart of milk, or milk and water; put the milk and water over the fire to boil, reserve ing enough to wet the rice. Stir out the lumps, add a large teaspoon ful o...
-How To Make Graham Bread
Make a sponge at night of one pint of warm water, two cups of white flour, half a cup of yeast, and half a teaspoon-ful of salt. In the morning, when light, add half a cup of Indian meal, the same of ...
-How To Make Brown Bread
Raised Brown Bread Stir into a pint of warm water one cup of white flour, two of rye meal, and two of Indian meal, one of molasses, a small cup of good yeast, a teaspoonful of salt, and a small tea...
-How To Make Steamed Brown Bread
For a very small family, take half a pint of rye meal, not sifted, and a pint of sifted Indian meal, a pint of sour milk, a half a gill of molasses, a teaspoonful of salt, and a large tea-spoonful of ...
-How To Make Good Family Bread
For five common-sized loaves, make a pint and a half of thin water gruel. Use half a teacupful of fine Indian meal. Salt it a little more than if it were to be eaten as gruel, and boil ten or fifteen ...
-Various Convenient Uses Of Bread Dough
In the winter, dough may be kept sweet many days in a place where it will be cold, without freezing, and it will grow better till the last. It should be raised light, then kneaded a little, and then c...
-Biscuits, Tea Cakes, Griddle Cakes, Etc
Jenny Lind Take one egg, one teacup of sugar, one of sweet milk, two and a half of flour, a dessert-spoonful of butter, two teaspoon-fuls of cream-of-tartar, one of saleratus, and a very little sal...
-How To Make Fritters And Pancakes
Fritters, Or Pancakes Make a batter of a pint of milk, three eggs, salt, and flour to make a rather thick batter. Beat it well, then drop it with a spoon into hot fat, and fry like doughnuts. These...
-How To Make Biscuit
Cream Biscuit These are to be made in the same manner as the buttermilk biscuit, except that no butter is required: the cream will make them sufficiently short. Potato Biscuit Boil four good ...
-How To Make Muffins And Puffs
Sour-Milk Muffins To a pint of sour milk put one egg, without first beating it, a little salt, a teaspoonful of saleratus, and one of butter, melted with the saleratus, in a spoonful of hot water. ...
-How To Make Buns
Busk, Or Buns To a pint bowl of light dough add a cup of sugar, half as much butter, and either a little cinnamon, allspice, or lemon. Work these ingredients together, and then add flour enough to ...
-How To Make Raised Biscuit
Take a pint bowl full of light dough; break into it a fresh egg, and add a piece of butter the size of ah egg. Knead in these until perfectly incorporated with the dough. It will require about ten min...
-How To Make Griddle Cakes
White Flour Griddle Cakes To a quart of milk put two eggs, a little salt, a large spoonful of butter melted into the milk, a small gill of yeast, and flour enough to make a batter about as thick as...
-How To Make Corn Cakes
Corn-Cake Stir into three cups of sour milk a half a cup of white sugar, one cup of white flour, one teaspoonful of salt, and a beaten egg. Add a teaspoonful of soda dissolved in about a spoonful o...
-How To Make An Indian Meal
These are made like the sour-milk cakes, only that the milk is chiefly thickened with Indian meal. A spoonful or two of flour should be added; and it is well to use two eggs instead of one, but not ne...
-How To Make Johnny-Cake
Raised Johnny-Cake Take a pint of sweet milk, half a gill of yeast, one gill of flour, a teaspoonful of salt, and half a teaspoonful of saleratus; stir in Indian meal enough to make it rather stiif...
-Directions For Making Cake
When cake or pastry is to be made, take care not to make trouble for others by scattering materials, and soiling the table or floor, or by the needless use of many dishes. Put on a large and clean apr...
-How To Make Frosting
A pound of the best of fine white sugar, the whites of three fresh eggs, a teaspoonful of nice starch, pounded, and sifted through a piece of muslin or a very fine sieve, the juice of half a lemon, an...
-How To Make Fruit Cakes
Wedding Five pounds each of flour, butter, and sugar, six of raisins, twelve of currants, two of citron, fifty eggs, half a pint of good Malaga wine, three ounces of nutmegs, three of cinnamon, one...
-How To Make Raised Cakes
Commencement Four pounds of flour, two and a half of sugar, two of butter, a small quart of milk, half a pint of wine, eight eggs, two gills of yeast, two nutmegs, two teaspoonfuls of cinnamon, one...
-Cup Cakes
[The cup used as a measure for the receipts in this book is not the tea-table china cup, but the common large earthen teacup, except where a small one is specified; and the teaspoon used is neither th...
-Sponge Cakes
The goodness of all delicate cake, but specially of sponge, depends very much upon its being made with fresh eggs. There are several ways of making this cake which all result well. For those who choos...
-Various Kinds Of Cake
Queen's Cake One pound of flour, one of sugar, half a pound of butter (that which has lain in a jar of rose-leaves is best), live eggs, a gill of wine, a gill of cream, a nutmeg, half a teaspoonful...
-Various Kinds Of Cake. Part 2
Orange Cake Two cups of sugar, two cups of flour, half a cup of water, the yolks of five eggs, the whites of three, one teaspoonful of cream-of-tartar, and half a one of saleratus. Add a little sal...
-Various Kinds Of Cake. Part 3
Portsmouth Cake Rub to a cream one cup of sugar and two-thirds of a cup of butter. Add the yolks of three eggs and the white of one, beaten together two or three minutes. Add one cup of flour, the ...
-How To Make Chocolate Cake
One cup and a half of white sugar, half a cup of butter, half a teaspoonful of soda dissolved in half a cup of milk, three cups of flour, with one teaspoonful of cream-of-tartar stirred into it, and t...
-How To Make Rochester Jelly-Cake
Two cups of sugar, three eggs, two-thirds of a cup of butter, one cup of sweet milk, three cups of flour with one tea-spoonful of cream-of-tartar mixed in it, half a teaspoonful of saleratus dissolved...
-Cheats Cakes, Cookies, Wafers, Kisses, Jumbles, Gingerbread, Etc
The eggs for these articles, except for the wafers, need not be broken separately, but yolks and whites may be added without beating, after the sugar and butter have been stirred. When all has been we...
-How To Make Cream Cakes & Cookies
Cream Cakes A pint of water, half a pound of butter, three-quarters of a pound of flour, and eight eggs. Boil the water, melt the butter in it, stir in the flour dry while it boils; when it is cool...
-How To Make Kisses & Macaroons
Kisses Beat the whites of three fresh eggs to a stiff froth, then mix with it five spoonfuls of finest white sugar, and flavor with essence of lemon. Have ready a nice pan buttered, in which lay wh...
-How To Make Wafers
One cup of butter, two of sugar, half a cup of new milk, three eggs, half a nutmeg, the juice of a lemon, one teaspoonful of saleratus, and flour enough to roll out. If you prefer, flavor with a few d...
-How To Cook Gingerbread & Ginger Snaps
Hard Sugar Gingerbread Two cups of butter, four of sugar, two eggs, a cup and a half of milk, two teaspoonfuls of ginger, and one of saleratus. Flour to make rather a stiff dough. Another (Very ...
-How To Make Molasses Gingerbread
Soft Molasses Gingerbread One cup and a half of molasses, one of beef-shortening or butter, or half of each, two cups of sour milk, half cup of brown sugar, and two teaspoonfuls of saleratus. Have ...
-Fried Cakes
On Frying Cakes To have fried cakes good, it is necessary that the fat should be of the right heat. When it is hot enough, it will cease to bubble, and be perfectly still. It is best to try it with...
-How To Make Doughnuts
Ellen's Doughnuts Rub a piece of butter large as an egg, into one cup and a half of sugar. Add a beaten egg. Mix in two cups of flour, two teaspoonfuls of cream of tartar, and dissolve in two cups ...
-On Making Pastry
The flour, as in making bread or cake, should be sifted. The best looking pastry is made with lard, but it is not so healthy or good, as that which is made with half or two thirds butter. Whichever yo...
-Hot To Make Good Pie Crusts
Rich Puff Paste For three pints of flour allow one pound of butter. Divide it into three parts; reserve one-third of the flour for use in rolling in two parts. Rub one-third of the butter into the ...
-How To Make Pies
Of Stewed Apple Stew the apple with water enough to prevent its burning; sweeten and flavor it to your taste, and, while it is hot, add butter in the proportion of a dessert spoonful to a quart of ...
-How To Make Pies. Part 2
Whortleberry Fill the dish not quite even full, and to each pie of the size of a large soup plate, add four large spoonfuls of sugar (for blackberries and blueberries, five). Dredge a very little f...
-How To Make Pies. Part 3
Temperance Boil five pounds of meat in water enough to have one quart when it is done; chop the meat very fine when it is cold, and add a quarter of a pound of suet, or salt pork, three pounds and ...
-How To Make Puffs
Make a rich paste of a quart of flour; after you have rubbed in part of the butter, cut the white of an egg to a stiff froth; reserve half a spoonful of it, and stir the rest, and the water into the f...
-Directions About Puddings
The eggs for all sorts of puddings in which they are used, should be well beaten, and then strained. If hot milk is used, the eggs should be added after all the other ingredients. Milk for pumpkin, sq...
-How To Make Pudding Sauce
Elegant Pudding Sauce To four large spoonfuls of fine white sugar, put two of butter, one of flour, and stir them together to a cream in an earthen dish. Cut the white of an egg to a stiff froth, a...
-How To Make Pudding
Apple Pudding To a quart of stewed sour apple, put while it is hot, a piece of butter the size of an egg, and sugar enough to make it quite sweet. Beat it several minutes in order to mix it thoroug...
-How To Make Pudding. Part 2
Bread Pudding Take nice pieces of light bread, break them up, and put a small pint bowl full into a quart of milk; set it in a tin pail or brown dish on the back part of the stove or range, where i...
-How To Make Pudding. Part 3
White Mountain Pudding Line a pudding-dish with thin slices of bread buttered and dipped in milk; spread over them a layer of hot apple-sauce nicely flavored, then add another layer of bread and bu...
-How To Make Pudding. Part 4
Sago Pudding A pint of milk, a table-spoonful and a half of pearl sago, two eggs, two large spoonfuls of sugar, and half a teaspoon of salt. Wash the sago in warm, but not hot water, twice; then pu...
-How To Make Pudding. Part 5
German Puffs For a pint of milk allow six yolks and three whites of eggs, four large spoonfuls of flour, one of melted butter, a little salt, and half a nutmeg. Mix the flour smooth in a little of ...
-How To Make Batter Pudding
Baked Batter Pudding Allow a pint of cold milk, four table-spoonfuls of flour, two eggs, and a little salt. Stir the flour smooth in a part of the milk, then put in the eggs without first beatin...
-Another Pudding
To a quart of milk put six eggs, eight spoonfuls of flour, and a teaspoonful of salt. To be boiled two hours. If you wish to make a nice addition to your dinner on short notice, prepare this batter...
-How To Make Rice Pudding
Rice Pudding Boil a teacupful of rice in two teacups of water. When it has swelled so as to absorb the water, add a quart of milk and five or six peach leaves, and boil it until the rice is perfect...
-Squash, Or Pumpkin Pudding
A pint of milk, a large coffee-cup of strained pumpkin or squash, two eggs, three large spoonfuls of sugar, a teaspoonful of butter, a little salt, a small teaspoonful of cinnamon, half as much ginger...
-Tapioca Pudding
To a quart of milk, put two thirds of a cup of tapioca, five or six eggs, a dessert spoonful of butter, a cup of sugar, a teaspoon-ful of salt, and flavor with lemon, nutmeg, or extract of rose. Do no...
-Puddings Without Eggs
Berry Pudding To a quart of washed whortleberries, put a pint of flour in which you have put a small teaspoonful of salt. Add a very little water. That which is upon the berries will be nearly enou...
-Dumplings, And Other Inexpensive Articles For Dessert
Apple Dumplings (Boiled) The best and most healthful crust for them is made like cream tartar biscuit, or with potatoes, according to the directions under the head of Pastry. It is better to make o...
-Dumplings, And Other Inexpensive Articles For Dessert. Continued
Holey Poley Make a potato crust, or a paste of light bread, with butter rolled in, or one of cream tartar biscuit, as you prefer; roll it narrow and long, about a third of an inch thick; spread it ...
-How To Make A Dessert With Ground Rice
Measure a quart of milk, and then take out two cupfuls. Set the remainder into a kettle of hot water; then wet a teacupful of ground rice, and a teaspoonful of salt, with the reserved cold milk. When ...
-Sweet Dishes
In making blanc-mange, custards, ice-creams, etc, do not boil the milk in a sauce-pan, but set it, in a tin pail, into a kettle of boiling water. The milk does not rise, when boiled thus, as it does i...
-How To Make Calf's-Foot Jelly
Scald four calf's feet only enough to take off the hair, (more will extract the juices). Clean them nicely. When this is done, put them into five quarts of water and boil them until the water is half ...
-How To Make Blanc-Mange
Isinglass Blanc-Mange Wash an ounce and a half of calf's-foot isinglass, and put it into a quart of milk over night. In the morning add three peach leaves, and boil it, slowly, twenty minutes or ha...
-How To Make Custards
Almond Custards Blanch and beat in a marble mortar, with two spoonfuls of rose-water, a quarter of a pound of almonds; beat the yolks of four eggs with two table-spoonfuls of sugar, mix the almonds...
-How To Make Boiled Custards
Put a quart of milk into a tin pail or a pitcher that holds two quarts; set it into a kettle of hot water. Tin is better than earthen, because it heats so much quicker. Put in a few sticks of cinnamon...
-Directions For Making Ices.
Mix equal quantities of coarse salt and ice chopped small; set the freezer containing the cream into a firkin, and put in the ice and salt; let it come up well around the freezer. Turn and shake the f...
-How To Make Ice-Cream
A Rich Ice-Cream Squeeze a dozen lemons, and strain the juice upon as much fine sugar as it will absorb; pour three quarts of cream into it very slowly, stirring very fast all the time. Chocolat...
-How To Make Ice-Cream. Continued
Strawberry Sherbet Crush one box of strawberries; add three pints of water and the juice of a lemon. Let it stand for a few hours, then strain through a bag or cloth upon two cups of white sugar. S...
-How To Preserve Fruit And Make Jellies
A kettle should be kept on purpose. Brass, if very bright, will do. If acid fruit is preserved in a brass kettle which is not bright, it becomes poisonous. Bell-metal is better than brass, and the iro...
-How To Preserve Fruits
How To Preserve Apples Weigh equal quantities of Newtown pippins, and the best of sugar; allow one sliced lemon for every pound. Make a syrup, and then put in the apples. Boil them until they are t...
-How To Preserve Peaches & Pears
How To Preserve Peaches Select peaches that are ripe, but not soft. Pour boiling water upon them, and let it stand five or six minutes; then pour it off, and pull off the skins. This is the easiest...
-How To Preserve Strawberries
Take large strawberries not extremely ripe; weigh equal quantities of fruit and best sugar; lay the fruit in a dish, and sprinkle half the sugar over it; shake the dish a little, that the sugar may to...
-How To Make Jam & Marmalade
Apple Jam (Which Will Keep For Years) Weigh equal quantities of brown sugar and good sour apples. Pare and core them, and chop them fine. Make a syrup of the sugar, and clarify it very thoroughly; ...
-How To Make Fruit Jelly
Apple Jelly Take good sour apples, wash and wipe them, cut out any black spots upon the skin, and cut them up without paring or coring. Much of the richness of the apple is in the skin and core. Bo...
-How To Preserve Quinces
Procure the apple, or orange quince. It is much less apt to be hard, when preserved, than the pear quince. Pare and core the fruit, and allow equal weights of fruit and fine sugar. Boil quinces in wat...
-Directions For Canning Fruit
Tomatoes should be taken fresh, ripe, but not soft. Scald them ten minutes in their own liquor; add nothing, not even salt. Put them into cans the moment they are scalded. Tin cans will keep them good...
-Baked And Stewed Fruits
These are economical, excellent, and healthy; and it is well worth while for every family possessing only a plot of ground large enough for two trees, to set out a pear and sweet apple tree. Boiled...
-Baked And Stewed Apples
Apple Sauce Put a quart of water in a porcelain saucepan, with two cups of white sugar, and half a lemon sliced, or a stick of cinnamon. When it has boiled about five minutes, add as many apples, p...
-How To Stew Dried Apples Or Peaches
Wash them in two or three waters, and put them to soak in rather more water than will cover them, as they absorb a great deal. After soaking two hours, put them into a preserving kettle in the same wa...
-How To Select And Take Care Of Beef, Mutton, Lamb, Veal, And Pork
Ox beef is the best; next to this the flesh of an heifer; and both are in perfection during the first three months of the year. Choose that, the lean of which is red and of a fine grain, and the fat o...
-Lamb Is Best In July And August
Veal is best in the spring. It should look white and be fat. The breast is particularly nice stuffed; the loin should be roasted. The leg is an economical piece, as you can take off cutlets from the l...
-Ham And Tongue Should Be Sliced Very Thin
Pork, to be the best, should not be more than a year old. The chine is the best roasting piece; the spare-ribs are very sweet food, but too rich to be healthy. The shoulder is good roasted, stuffed wi...
-Stock For Gravies And Soups
Wash a leg or shin of beef very clean, crack the bone in two or three places, put with it any trimmings you may have of meat or fowls, such as gizzards, necks, etc.; cover them with cold water in a st...
-On Roasting Meat
If meat is to be roasted before the fire, allow a quarter of an hour for the cooking of every pound in warm weather, and in winter twenty minutes. Flour it well, and put two or three gills of water in...
-On Boiling Meat
It is a common impression that boiled meat requires very little attention; and probably one reason why many persons dislike it, may be, that it is seldom so carefully cooked as roast meat. If prope...
-Directions For Making Gravies And Sauces For Meat, Poultry, And Fish
Many young housekeepers who succeed well in most kinds of cooking, are a long time in finding out how to make good gravy. To have it free from fat is the most important thing. For a small family it is...
-How To Make Meat Sauces
Drawn Butter Take a small cupful of butter, and rub into it half a table-spoonful of flour, then pour upon it about a gill of boiling water, stirring it fast. Set it upon the coals, and let it boil...
-Stuffing Or Dressing Of Various Kinds
For a fillet of veal, a turkey, chickens, partridges, and pigeons, take light bread enough to make three gills of fine crumbs. Cut off the crust and lay by itself in just enough boiling water to softe...
-Vegetables And Sauces Appropriate To Different Meats
Potatoes are good with all meats. With poultry they are nicest mashed. Sweet potatoes are most appropriate with roast meat, as also are onions, winter squash, cucumbers, and asparagus. Carrots, par...
-Directions For Cooking Meats
How To Roast Beef See the directions for roasting meat. Beef Steak The best slices are cut from the rump, or through the sirloin. The found is seldom tender enough, and is very good cooked...
-Directions For Cooking Meats. Continued
Another (More Rich) Take seven or eight pounds of the upper part of the round, cut off the coarse fat upon the side, and make deep incisions in every part. To a pint bowl of bread crumbs, put peppe...
-How To Cook Mutton Or Lamb
How To Roast Mutton Any part may be roasted, but the leg is the best. Allow twenty minutes for a pound, and do according to the directions for roasting meat. Remember to flour it well, and baste of...
-How To Cook Tongue
How To Boil A Tongue A corned tongue may be put to boil as soon as washed; but one that has been long salted should be soaked over night. A smoked tongue should be well washed, then soaked in a ...
-How To Roast A Fillet Of Veal
Veal requires more time than any other meat except pork. It is scarcely ever done too much. A leg weighing eight or nine pounds should roast three hours. If your family is large, so that most of it wi...
-How To Cook Veal
A Loin Of Veal A breast or a loin of veal should be basted a great many times and roasted thoroughly. It is an improvement to put on slices of pork as in cooking the leg. Allow two hours for roasti...
-How To Cook Veal. Continued
Broiled Veal It must not be done too fast, and will take longer than beef. It is a great improvement to broil pork and lay between the slices of veal. Lay them upon the meat while it is broiling, a...
-How to Cook Pork & Ham
A Shoulder Of Pork One weighing ten pounds will require full three hours and a half to roast it. For a small family divide it, and roast one. half and corn the other. With a sharp knife score the s...
-How To Roast A Pig
It should not be more than a month old. It is better a little less, and it should be killed on the morning of the day it is to be cooked. Sprinkle fine salt over it an hour before it is put to the fir...
-How To Fry Sausages
Sausages may be kept for some time, but fresh ones are considered best. Separate them, prick them to prevent their bursting, and lay them in a spider. If they are properly made, they will need no fat ...
-How To Cook Smoked Beef
Frizzled Smoked Beef Shave thin slices, and put them in a teacupful of milk into a small kettle or sauce-pan; boil it a few minutes, and then add a small bit of butter and an egg beaten with a teas...
-How To Boil A Ham Or Shoulder
A ham, weighing twelve pounds, should be cooked four or five hours. Boil it slowly in a plenty of water half the time it should be cooked; then take off the skin and any excrescences that were not rem...
-How To Lay Meat And Poultry On The Dish For The Table
Lay a sirloin of beef with the tenderloin down, and the thick end towards the left hand of the person who carves. A loin of veal or a quarter of lamb, with the thick edge toward the carver, and the...
-How To Select Poultry And Prepare It For Being Cooked
A young turkey has a smooth leg, and a soft bill, and if fresh, the eyes will be bright, and the feet moist. Old turkeys have scaly, stiff feet. Young fowls have a tender skin, smooth legs, and the...
-How To Roast A Turkey
Observe the directions under the head, To prepare Poultry for being cooked. Make a stuffing, and fill both the breast and body. Sew it up with a needle and coarse thread; tie the skin over the end of ...
-How To Cook Turkey
How To Bone A Turkey Boil a turkey in as little water as may be; remove all the skin and the fat. Slice the meat, get all off clean from the bones, mix the dark and white parts together, and season...
-How To Cook Ducks
How To Roast Ducks Flour them thick and baste them often. If they are roasted before the fire, an hour is long enough; if in a stove, an hour and a half. For making the stuffing and gravy, see the ...
-How To Cook Geese and Partridges
How To Roast A Goose Boil it half an hour to take out the strong, oily taste, then stuff and roast it exactly like a turkey. If it is a young one, an hour's roasting will be sufficient. How To B...
-How To Cook Pigeons
How To Roast Pigeons Pick out the pin feathers, or if there are a great many, pull off the skin. Examine the inside very carefully. Soak them half an hour in a good deal of water, to take out the b...
-Chickens, Lamb, Pigeons, Etc, Curried
Boil and joint two chickens. Fry three or four slices of salt pork, and when they are nearly brown add a large spoonful of butter. Cut three or four onions fine, and fry them a light brown; then remov...
-How To Cook Soups
Soup is economical food, and by a little attention may be made good with very small materials. It should never be made of meat that has been kept too long. If meat is old, or has become tainted in the...
-How To Cook Soups. Part 2
Julienne Soup Slice two onions, and fry brown in half a spoonful of butter, in a soup-kettle. Then put in three quarts of good stock; chop small two turnips and two carrots. When these have boiled ...
-How To Cook Soups. Part 3
Vegetable Soup Take two turnips, two carrots, four potatoes, one large onion, one parsnip, and a few stalks of celery or some parsley. Cut them all very fine, or chop them in a tray; put them, with...
-How To Cook Veal Broth
Take a knuckle, or if you have a large family, two knuckles of veal. Put them over the fire, at least three hours before dinner-time; use not more than two quarts of water for two knuckle, and skim it...
-Eggs
Boiled Eggs New laid eggs require half a minute longer to cook than others. The fresher they are the better, and the more healthful. Eggs over a week old should never be boiled; they will do to fry...
-How To Cook Omelets
Omelet (Baked) Boil a pint of milk. Melt in it a teaspoonful of butter, and one of salt, and stir in a tablespoonful of flour rubbed smooth in cold milk. Pour this upon seven or eight eggs which ha...
-Directions Respecting Fish
Purchase those which have just been caught. Of this you can judge by their being hard under the pressure of the finger. Fish lose their best flavor soon, and a few hours make a wide difference in the ...
-Directions Respecting Fish. Continued
Minced Salt Fish Pick out all the bones and bits of skin the day that the fish is boiled, as it is most easily done while it is warm. Next day chop it fine, and also all the potatoes left of the pr...
-How To Cook Cod
How To Boil Cod Hub a little salt down the bone, and over the thick part. Wrap it in a cloth and put it over the fire in cold water; putting it into hot water at first will cause the outside to bre...
-How To Cook Salmon
Smoked Halibut Or Salmon Wash and lay it in a dish of cold water over night, with the flesh side down; wipe dry, and lay it on a gridiron over a moderate fire; turn it after a little time. It will ...
-How To Cook Oyster
Oyster Pie Line a deep dish that will hold rather more than a quart, with a good pie-crust nearly half an inch thick. Strain the liquor from a quart of oysters. Put in the bottom of the dish a laye...
-How To Cook Lobsters
Lobsters (To Select And Open) Buy those that have been boiled but a few hours. The heaviest, whether large or small, are best. Lobsters are sweet and tender early in the spring, and are good until ...
-How To Cook Clams
How To Open Clams After washing them thoroughly, pour boiling water over, and let them stand a while. The shells will open easily. Clam Chowder (Of Long Clams) Fry in a deep kettle two large ...
-Bound Clams, Or Quahogs
The round clams, sometimes called quahogs, are much the most healthy. The small ones, with thin edges, are to be preferred. They may be roasted upon a gridiron, or laid in an iron pan upon a stove. Wh...
-How To Cook Smelts
Soak smelts a little while in warm water; scrape them, and cut the heads so far that you can gently pull them off, and thus draw out the dark vein that runs through the body; then rinse and lay them i...
-How To Cook Eels
Fried Eels Skin and clean them well; cut them in pieces three inches long; boil them in milk and water with a little salt in it. When a fork goes into them easily, dip them in bread-crumbs or fine ...
-Directions For Salting Meat, Fish, Etc
To some young housekeepers, the salting of meat, and taking care of it, and of smoked meat, are perplexing. Perhaps the following directions may assist them. The best pieces to corn are the end of the...
-Directions For Salting Meat, Fish, Etc. Continued
Pickle For One Ham To a gallon of water, put a pint of salt, a pint of molasses, and an ounce of saltpetre. Turn the ham over in the brine often, and let it He in it six weeks; then let it be smoke...
-How To Make Sausages
A common fault is, that the meat is not chopped enough. It should be chopped very fine, and this is most easily done if it is a little frozen. When ready for the seasoning, put in just cold water enou...
-How To Salt Shad To Keep A Year
Procure those which are just caught; soak them an hour or two in a plenty of water, in order that the scales may be easily taken off. Take care to remove them all. Cut off the heads and open them down...
-How To Try Lard
The fat should not be suffered to stand long without being tried, because, even in cold weather, some parts of it may soon become musty, and nothing can then restore its sweetness. Remove all the lean...
-How To Cook Tomatoes
Stewed Tomatoes Scald them in order to remove the skins. Cat them up and put them into a saucepan, with a little salt, a bit of butter, and some fine crumbs of bread or pounded cracker. Let them st...
-How To Make Stewed Tomato (To Keep The Year Round)
Skin and cut up the fruit, and boil it gently two hours in a porcelain kettle; add nothing to it but a little salt. Have ready enough clean bottles to contain the quantity to be stewed. Olive bottles ...
-How To Make Catsup
Slice the tomatoes and sprinkle them with salt. If you in tend to let them stand until you have gathered several parcels, put in plenty of salt. After you have gathered all you intend to use, boil the...
-How To Make Pickled Tomatoes
Wash and weigh eight pounds of green tomatoes, chop them small, and pour away the liquid that flows out. Allow four pounds sugar, two quarts cider-vinegar, and eight onions. Put the vinegar to boil in...
-How To Dress Lettuce
Get that in which the head is hard and compact. Lay it on ice, or in ice-water, until nearly time to serve; then break off the imperfect leaves, and throw them aside. Cut off the remainder of the leav...
-How To Make Salads
Salmon Salad.* Take a pound, or less, of boiled salmon. While warm, remove the skin, and as many bones as you can without breaking the fish. Lay it in a deep dish. Put a few cloves in and around it...
-On Cooking Vegetables
After being well washed, they should be laid in water, excepting corn and peas, which should be husked and shelled with clean hands, and not washed, as some of the sweetness is thereby extracted. Put ...
-How To Cook Vegitables
Mashed Turnips Boil them in salt and water, at least an hour and a half, unless they are of early growth. Take them from the kettle into a deep dish, press them a little and pour off the water; mas...
-How To Cook Vegitables. Part 2
Cucumbers Cucumbers should be gathered while dew is yet on them, and put immediately into water. Half an hour before dinner, pare and slice them very thin, and let them lie in fresh water till dinn...
-How To Cook Vegitables. Part 3
Summer Squash If the rind is tender, boil it whole, in a little bag kept for the purpose. It should be put into boiling water; three quarters of an hour is long enough to cook it. Take the bag into...
-How To Cook Potatoes
How To Boil Potatoes The best potatoes are good boiled without paring, but even they, are best pared; and poor potatoes are unfit to eat, boiled with the skins on. New potatoes are made watery by b...
-How To Cook Corn
Boiled Corn Put the ears into boiling water, with salt in it, and boil them half an hour. Corn Soup Cut the corn off the cob, and boil the cobs half an hour in the water; then take them out, ...
-How To Make Pickles And Condiments
Pickles should never be kept in potter's ware, as arsenic and other poisonous substances are used in the glazing; and this is sometimes decomposed by vinegar. Whole families have been poisoned in this...
-How To Make Pickles And Condiments. Part 2
Onions Select as many small silver onions as a quart of water will, cover. Boil in this a short time half a cup of salt, and pour over the onions. Let them remain twenty-four hours closely covered;...
-How To Make Pickles And Condiments. Part 3
Piccalilli (Of All Kinds Of Pickles) Mix tomatoes, chopped and drained, with chopped onions, red and green peppers, horse-radish, etc., as you like. Add spices, salt, sugar, and a little curry-powd...
-Tea, Coffee, Chocolate, Cocoa, Etc. Tea
See that the water boils. Scald the pot, and put in a tea-spoonful for each person. Upon green tea, pour a little water, and allow it to stand two or three minutes where it will keep hot; then fill th...
-How To Roast Coffee
As this must be done well in order to have good coffee, directions for it may not be amiss. There are often little stones in coffee, of the same color with it; therefore, pick it over carefully. If yo...
-How To Make Coffee
Put a coffee-cupful into a pot that will hold three pints of water; add the white of an egg, or two or three clean eggshells, or a well cleansed and dried bit of fish-skin of the size of a ninepence. ...
-Chocolate
For those who use a great deal of chocolate, the following is an economical method. Cut a cake into small bits and put them into a pint of boiling water. In a few minutes set it off the fire and stir ...
-Shells
Put a heaping teacupful to a quart of boiling water. Boil them a great while. Half an hour will do, but two or three hours is far better. Scald milk as for coffee. If there is not time to boil shells ...
-Baked Pork And Beans
For a family of six or seven, take a quart of white beans, wash them in several waters, and put them into two or three quarts over night. In the morning (when it will be easier to cull out the bad one...
-Salt Meat And Vegetables, Boiled Together
Put in the beef first, and allow twenty-five minutes or half an hour for every pound. Skim the water when it begins to simmer. An hour and a half before the dinner-hour, put in the pork, well scraped ...
-Remnants Of Roast Beef
Take off with a sharp knife all the meat from the bones. If there are a few nice slices, reserve them, if most convenient, to be eaten cold. Chop the rest fine in a tray. Take cold gravy, without the ...
-Convenient Common Dishes, And Ways Of Using Remnants
Remnants Of Boiled Meat Chop fine cold pieces of soup meat, or other boiled meat, salt or fresh; then add cold potatoes, and when these are chopped and mixed with the meat, heat in a spider some co...
-Convenient Common Dishes, And Ways Of Using Remnants. Continued
Pressed Veal (For Lunch Or Tea) Boil a shin of veal in four quarts of water until the meat is soft enough to allow the bones to be taken out, and the water is nearly boiled away. Chop the meat fine...
-How To Boil Rice
Rice should be carefully picked over, and then washed first in warm water, and rubbed between the hands; then, five or six times in a good deal of cold water. It will not be white unless it is well wa...
-Cracked Wheat
Take one or two quarts, according to the size of the family, put it into cold water and after stirring it well, let it settle, then pour off the water, and add more, in the proportion of three quarts ...
-Hasty Pudding
Boil in a pot or kettle about six quarts of water, leaving room for the addition of the meal; mix a pint bowl full of Indian meal and cold water with a small spoonful of salt, When the water boils, st...
-Hominy, Boiled And Fried
Take a pint of hominy, put cold water over it, stir, and let it settle; then pour off the water. Do this twice; then put it into a tin pudding-pan or pail, in three pints of water to soak over night. ...
-Oat-Meal Pudding & Baked Rice
Oat-Meal Pudding (For Breakfast) Have a pint of water in a saucepan. Wet two tablespoon-fuls of oat-meal in cold water, with a small teaspoonful of salt. Rub it smooth as you can (it will not rub s...
-How To Make Pan Pie
The sour apples that drop from the trees early in the autumn, make an excellent pan pie without being pared. The skin then contains much of the richness of the apple, and is often so thin, that when c...
-Toast and Crumb Cakes
Crumb Cakes Keep a bowl or pitcher with sour milk in it, and from time to time throw in the crumbs of bread which break off when it is sliced, and also the dry pieces left of the table. When you ne...
-Uses For Pieces Of Bread
In some families there is always an accumulation of pieces of bread, and a good deal of ingenuity is necessary to prevent waste. If bread is good, and proper care is taken, such a thing as a plate of ...
-Care Of Fat And Drippings
In a large family, where much meat is consumed, the care of the fat and drippings is an important item; and every housekeeper should know what is done with them.* If she has a young cook, she probably...
-How To Make Soap With Potash
Allow sixteen pounds each of grease and potash for a barrel of soap. The grease should be such as has been well taken care of, viz., tried before it became wormy or mouldy. The potash should be about ...
-How To Make Soap With Ashes
The following method of making soap with ashes has been tried and proved good. Provide a leach cask, that is, one that is large at the top, and small at the bottom. If this is not readily obtained,...
-The Care Of Milk, And Making Butter
No branch of household economy brings a better reward than the making of butter; and to one who takes an interest in domestic employments, it soon becomes a pleasant occupation. The following instr...
-A Good Brine For Keeping Butter
To two quarts of water, put one of clean fine salt, a pound of loaf or crushed sugar, and a teaspoonful of saltpetre. When it has stood an hour, in order that the salt and sugar may dissolve, strain ...
-On Making Cheese
The articles used in making cheese should be kept sweet and clean as in making butter. They should be scalded daily, and never be set away until perfectly dry. The conveniences wanted are a large pine...
-How To Make Cheese
Strain the night's milk into the tub; in the morning stir in the cream (if you want rich cheese do not let any of it be taken off), and put a part of the milk over a clear fire, in the brass kettle. H...
-Food And Drinks For The Sick, And For Infants, And Suggestions In Regard To Sickness
Chicken Broth If the weather is warm, use but half a chicken to make broth for one person. If it is cool take a whole one, as the broth will keep several days. Pull oft* the skin (because there is ...
-Food And Drinks, And Suggestions In Regard To Sickness. Part 2
Oatmeal Gruel Put two large spoonfuls of oatmeal, wet in cold water, into three pints of boiling water; boil it gently half an hour, skim it, add a little salt, sugar, and nutmeg. If raisins are al...
-Food And Drinks And Suggestions In Regard To Sickness. Part 3
Wine Jelly Put into a porcelain saucepan half a paper of English gelatine and a large half cup of white sugar. Pour over half a pint of cold water, and let it soak for fifteen minutes. Then add hal...
-Food And Drinks And Suggestions In Regard To Sickness. Part 4
Posset Put a pint of milk into a tin pail, and set it into a kettle of hot water. Pound a soda-cracker very fine, and stir into the milk when it boils. Beat two eggs with two tablespoon-fuls of fin...
-How To Make Beef Tea
Cut a piece of lean, juicy beef into pieces an inch square, put them into a wide-mouthed bottle and cork it tight. Set the bottle into a kettle of cold water and boil it an hour and a half. This mode ...
-For A Child Just Weaned
There is always danger, especially in warm weather, that the stomach, even of a healthy child, will become disordered by being weaned; and it is important to guard against the evil, by careful attenti...
-Food For An Infant At Successive Periods
For the first three months: - 5 grains of gelatine; 25 grains of arrow-root; 2 gills of milk; 1 gill of cream; 1 1/2 pints of water. From three to six months: - gelatine, arrow-root, and water, as ...
-Miscellaneous Receipts And Useful Directions
Italian Cream. * Soak half a box of English gelatine in a pint and a half of milk for an hour. Set it over the fire; stir till it boils; then sweeten, and add the beaten yolks of four eggs. Flavor ...
-Miscellaneous Receipts And Useful Directions. Part 2
Snow-Balls One cup of flour, one of sugar, three eggs, one table-spoonful of yeast-powder (Preston & Merrill's), one of milk, a teaspoonful of essence of lemon, a little salt. Steam in tin cups in ...
-Miscellaneous Receipts And Useful Directions. Part 3
Lemon Syrup One pound of loaf or crushed sugar to every half pint of lemon juice. Let it stand twenty-four hours, or till the sugar is dissolved, stirring it very often with a silver spoon. When di...
-Miscellaneous Receipts And Useful Directions. Part 4
Maple Beer To four gallons of boiling water, add one quart of maple syrup and a small table-spoonful of essence of spruce. When it is about milk warm, add a pint of yeast; and when fermented, bottl...
-Miscellaneous Receipts And Useful Directions. Part 5
Tooth Powder Two ounces of Peruvian bark, two of myrrh, one of chalk, one of Armenian bole, and one of orris root. Rose Butter (a good substitute for rose water). Gather every morning the lea...
-Miscellaneous Receipts And Useful Directions. Part 6
How To Take Out Iron Mould Dissolve a teaspoonful of salts of tin in two table-spoonfuls of water. Dip the iron-mould into the solution, and let it re main five minutes. Then dip it into a mixture ...
-Miscellaneous Receipts And Useful Directions. Part 7
A Permanent Cement For Glass, China, And Wood Steep Russian Isinglass twenty-four hours in white brandy, gently boil and stir the mixture until it is well compounded, and a drop of it, cooled, will...
-Miscellaneous Receipts And Useful Directions. Part 8
How To Sweep A Cemented Cellar Open the windows, shut the dampers in the heat-pipes of the furnace, and close the registers in all the rooms above. Sprinkle the floor plentifully with a watering-po...
-Miscellaneous Receipts And Useful Directions. Part 9
How To Prepare Earth For House Plants Put together equal parts of the three following things - soil from the sides of a barn-yard, well-rotted manure, and leaf mould from the woods, or earth from t...
-How To Drive Away Ants
The little red ants will leave closets where sea-sand is sprinkled, or where oyster-shells or sprigs of arbor vitas are laid. Scatter sprigs of wormwood in places infested with black ants. To se...
-How To Purify A Well
When a well is cleared out, if any offensive substance is found in it, have the bottom sprinkled with two or three quarts of quick-lime. As a general rule, it is most economical to buy the best art...
-Directions About Washing, Etc
The design of these directions is to assist the inexperienced; to teach those who are unacquainted with the business of washing, how to do it, and those who can afford to employ others, how to direct ...
-Directions About Washing, Etc. Continued
When you wring the clothes from the first rinsing-water, see whether the streaks you could not rub out have disappeared. If not, they can probably be removed quickly now. Wring the clothes dry, else t...
-Starching, Ironing, And Polishing Gentlemen's Linen
To make the Starch - Dissolve three table-spoonfuls of the best of starch in cold water, and stir it very fast into a quart of boiling water, and boil it half an hour. Five minutes before it is done, ...
-How To Wash, Starch, And Iron Muslins, Laces, Etc
Soiled muslins should be looked over and mended before being washed. Embroidered articles should be basted in exact shape upon a piece of flannel or other soft cloth. The muslin will be less liable to...
-How To Make Fine Starch
There is a great difference in the quality of starch. It is but labor lost to make use of that which is not good. There is so much difference in the quantity of gluten in this article, that no precise...
-How To Wash Thibet Cloths, Bombazines, Mouslin De Laines, And Plaids
If you wish to make over a dress before it is badly worn or soiled, rip it, and sponge it in warm water with Castile soap in it. Sponge a piece at a time, on the side which is to be out, and iron it o...
-How To Wash Colored, Plaid, Black, And Raw Silks And Ribbons
For a single dress, pare four or five good-sized potatoes, slice them thin and lay them in a quart of cold water for a few hours; then, if the silk is much soiled, sponge both sides freely, rubbing th...
-How To Renovate Black Veils And Lace
Make a very weak solution of gum arabic, so that it will barely be distinguishable from pure water; lay the veil or lace upon an ironing, or other smooth board, and apply the gumwater with a sponge. S...
-How To Wash English Blankets
If care is taken to keep them clean, they will seldom need to be washed. New ones ought not to need washing for several years. Those which are not in constant use, should be kept where they will not b...
-How To Wash Worsted Table-Covers
Wash them in quite warm water with olive soap. If this is not to be had, soft soap, if it is of the best kind, is better than common bar soap. This last, always has rosin in it, and sometimes there is...
-How To Wash Carpets
According to the experience of many persons, the Kidderminster carpets, and others of like fabric, are as well washed at a fulling-mill as at a dye-house, or by a professed carpet-cleanser. They are w...
-Hints In Regard To Health
One of the first things to be considered in the choice of a residence is the healthfulness of the position. In the country, the vicinity of low grounds or the banks of. a sluggish river are to be avoi...
-Regularity Of Meals
Regularity Of Meals is important to health. The meals of a family should be punctual, at regular hours. Three meals are sufficient. Dinner should be the most substantial; and the country custom of hav...
-Bathing
Cleanliness is not the only thing gained by a bath. A good bath brings the blood to the surface, and makes the skin vigorous and healthy. Daily ablutions of the entire body, says an approved writer, s...
-Care Of The Sick
It would be well, if in every house there were a large apartment which could be appropriated in case of sickness. The bed of an invalid should not stand in a remote corner of the room, but in a positi...
-Care Of Children
As an infant during its first month is usually under the care of a physician and nurse, particular directions here would be inappropriate; but perhaps a young mother, left for the first time, by the d...
-How To Treat Convulsions
Convulsions or spasms in children originate from various causes. Some children are constitutionally liable to them, and such will be almost sure to have them while getting their teeth. An infant not y...
-How To Treat Burns And Scalds
Every mother should know what to do at once in case a child is scalded or burned. The first thing to be done is to remove the clothes if the body is scalded. Better to cut them off than have much dela...







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