Mr. Editor: - In June, 1857,1 built a small vinery for the Hon. J. N. Arnold of this place. It being the 28th of May when we commenced, there were doubts as to the canes ripening so as to withstand our changeable winters, as there is more to fear from sudden changes than severity of frost. It was a lean-to, covering the south side of the barn or carriage house. We have excellent drainage and soil. In making the border we covered the surface with 18 inches of prairie loam and cow manure, 10 bushels of bone-dustfrom a button factory, two barrels of leached ashes and lime from a soap and candle factory, and applied soap-suds in the summer while the vines were in a growing state. The size of the house is 24 by 14, and 14 feet in height at the back, with 6 feet in front. The front sashes are hung on hinges at the top for ventilation. Mr. Arnold was bo well pleased with the growth in this small vinery, that he has erected a larger. I have taken, as you will see by Emery's Jour-bnal, the first premium for samples of cold vinery grapes grown on plants two years old. They were in competition with grapes from older vines and more costly structures.

My calculation in the same Journal of the profits of grape growing, is as follows:

DR.

Cost of grapery and border..............

$100

Interest two years.....................

20

Attention during two seasons of one hour each day at $2 per day.....

72

Ten per cent. per annum on the cost of the house for wear and decay......

20

Cost of vines and expressage- 24 vines at 50 cents.......

12

Rent of ground........

2

Manures................

5

Tools, including syringe, cords, etc..........

4

Total............

$235

CR.

250 pounds grapes, at Chicago prices, $2 per lb.......

$500

Profit...........

$265

We fruited twelve of the vines, and have the other twelve ready for a heavy crop next year. In my estimate, I have given more than the actual cost to the present time, and now have my vines, two years old next June, and the house left for future profit, besides the $265 in cash, which might easily have been obtained as profit on the fruit, and the real pleasure which grows out of the cultivation of such fruit.

•The varieties fruited were the Old Black Hamburg, Golden Chasselas, Chasselas Musque, Muscat of Alexandria, Wilmot's Black Hamburg, Royal Muscadine, Black Prince, Grizzly Frontignac, Zinfindale, and a few other varieties. Of these the Zinfindale and Black Hamburg fruited heaviest. The vines, obtained of Ellwanger and Barry, Rochester, New York, proved true to name and came in excellent order. Is the reader satisfied as to the profit of graperies?

There are only eleven vineries in Chicago, but several are going up this winter. I recommend fruiting the second year, and it will pay, as it is very difficult to get gentlemen to wait three or four years. I prefer planting double thick, fruiting half of these, and then cut out those that have fruited heavily. - J. C. Ure.