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Natural Hygiene: Man's Pristine Way Of Life | by Herbert M. Shelton



We are not Reformers; we are Revolutionists. Medical reform--the world has had quite enough of that. Reforming the drug system by substituting one set of drugs for another is a ridiculous farce. It may, to be sure, substitute a lesser for a greater evil, in many cases, but is like reforming big lies with little falsehoods. It is like reforming swearing with obscene language; or like reforming robbing with cheating. Reforming allopathy with homeopathy and both with physio-medicalism, and all these with eclecticism, is like promoting temperance by substituting cider and lager for rum, brandy, gin, wine, or flesh eating by substituting milk, butter, cheese, for animal food...

TitleNatural Hygiene: Man's Pristine Way Of Life
AuthorHerbert M. Shelton
PublisherDr. Shelton's Health School
Year1968
Copyright1968, Dr. Shelton's Health School
AmazonNatural Hygiene: Man's Pristine Way of Life
Herbert Shelton

Herbert M. Shelton

Author Of "Rubies In The Sand", "Health For The Millions", "Fasting Can Save Your Life", "Superior Nutrition", "Food Combining Made Easy", "Human Beauty: Its Culture And Hygiene"

To That brilliant company of men and women who served as accoucheurs at the rebirth of Hygiene, and to the glorious future that their labors make possible for all mankind, this book is sincerely dedicated

-Introduction
by Virginia Vetrano, B.S., D.C. We have been riding piggy-back on the shoulders of colossi, said Dr. Shelton to me only recently. When I asked him to name the giants he had in mind, he quickly repe...
-Introduction. Part 2
As for facts, we have a world filled with them, enough we think to justify us in our assertion that Hygiene is superior to all other systems of care ever tried. It has been estimated that man's collec...
-Introduction. Part 3
Because of ingrained prejudices of students, teachers, professors, and the man-on-the-street, Hygienists must be both courageous and adamant in their convictions. Our ideas, our motives, and our chara...
-Introduction. Part 4
It would be interesting in the history of science to investigate the reasons why certain large classes of facts have been rejected from time to time--why, for instance, was the church of Rome so pecul...
-Introduction. Part 5
Hygienists have a great work to do. Before they can teach a genuine science of life, they must first weed from the minds of their students their false medical theories and superstitions. Customs are d...
-Author's Introduction
We are taking it upon ourselves to write this book in an effort to introduce as many people as possible to the principles and practices of Natural Hygiene and to the results of its practices. Many of ...
-Author's Introduction. Part 2
The innocent assumption that truth is important can be dangerous in our capitalistic mad-house, where no truth is of sufficient importance that it may be permitted to stand in the way of profits. But,...
-Author's Introduction. Part 3
Fortunes of tremendous magnitude have been acquired by the compounders of elixirs and cordials. Specifics galore have been announced and tried. But the results of all this searching and experimenting ...
-Author's Introduction. Part 4
We do not care a peanut for the medical profession. It is the people that we seek to reach and convince. The profession is so securely wrapped up in its official ignorance and so determined to prese...
-Chapter I A Revolutionary Situation
It was in an era of hog, hominy and home spun. The North had just emerged from the age of white slavery; Negro slavery was in full flower in the South. In the West the process of murdering Indians a...
-A Revolutionary Situation. Part 2
Those glorious men of science who have been for centuries the lawful administrators of the big boluses, the powerful powders, the biting blisters and the almighty emetics were ever busy drugging their...
-A Revolutionary Situation. Part 3
Some of the physicians of the past went the whole drug-shop in the line of inhalative druggery. Among their multitudinous remedies which they recommended to be introduced into the delicate structure o...
-A Revolutionary Situation. Part 4
According to the legend, Robin Hood was bled to death by a man to whom he had resorted for relief from an inflammatory disease. The physician or bleeder is said to have seized the opportunity to rid t...
-A Revolutionary Situation. Part 5
During this era patients in the highest fevers were literally killed by dehydration by being denied water. Denial of water, despite an intense and persistent thirst, first drove the patient to madness...
-A Revolutionary Situation. Part 6
'Allopathy be blow'd,' said Jeff Hall, who was present when I asked the old man; 'it isn't against the laws of God, anyhow, and, for one, I think God knows full as well, to say the least, as any all...
-A Revolutionary Situation. Part 7
Writing in 1850, a woman who signed herself Marian thus pictures the requests of a dying child for water and air, both of them forbidden by her physician: 'Mother,' said the feverish child,  ...
-A Revolutionary Situation. Part 8
Cleanliness was utterly disregarded. Physicians not only frowned upon, but actually opposed bathing. Surgeons performed operations without washing their hands and the operating rooms of hospitals were...
-Chapter II The Hygienic Revolution
Reform means a change of externals. Reform is a patchwork program and is justifiable only when the thing that is to be reformed is basically sound and worth saving. Revolution, on the other hand, is a...
-The Hygienic Revolution. Part 2
With a mind well constituted for critical observation, and the right opportunity for calling its powers into action, Dr. Jennings, after having received a thorough medical education, commenced the pr...
-The Hygienic Revolution. Part 3
Hygienic Medication at the time this editorial was penned included the use of modalities of the Water Cure; whereas Graham's recovery took place before Priessnitz had originated his water cure. The ...
-Chapter III The Evolution Of Hygiene
Important as individual effort undoubtedly is, there is always a need for organized effort and cooperative work in the promotion of any truth. This fact was early recognized in the Hygienic movement a...
-The Evolution Of Hygiene. Part 2
Writing in the January 1858 issue of the journal, A. F. Compton, M.D., distinguished between the allopathic and the Hygienic system. Roland S. Houghton, M.D., who never became a Hygienist, both le...
-The Evolution Of Hygiene. Part 3
She tells us that: When as a mere child, scarcely yet in my teens, I often saw Dr. Graham at the house of a friend, the senior publisher of his 'Science of Human Life.' He was then engaged in superin...
-The Evolution Of Hygiene. Part 4
The people have learned to bathe, to eat more fruits and vegetables, to ventilate their homes, to get daily exercise, to avail themselves of the benefits of sunshine, to cast off their fears of night ...
-Chapter IV Hydropathy
The water-cure was introduced into America in 1844 by Joel Shew, M.D., who had gone to Austria to study the water-cure under Priessnitz. He was one of a number of American physicians who did this, amo...
-Hydropathy. Part 2
Many hydropathists were as little concerned with Hygiene as were the medical men of the time. They cured their patients with water applications and had no real need for aids. One Hygienist complained ...
-Hydropathy. Part 3
But this is just what the water-cure advocates wanted people to believe. Their books and magazine articles and their case reports were all filled with instructions for the application of water-cure ...
-Chapter V A Name Chosen
We have stressed in preceding pages the fact that the practices of the early Hygienists were a composite mixture of Hygiene and hydropathy, while most of the practitioners were designated as hydropath...
-A Name Chosen. Part 2
Field thought that the chief reason in favor of the term hydropathy was that Hygiene, strictly speaking, embraces only those means and habits which tend to preserve health; and that in the treatment ...
-A Name Chosen. Part 3
For these reasons, present-day Hygienists prefer to call this system the Hygienic System and refrain from attempting to restore the original meaning to the Greek term therapia. Inasmuch as a spurious ...
-Chapter VI Life Subject To Law
Sometime in the period of proto-history somebody invented the idea of the supernatural. He or they peopled the universe with a flock of capricious ghosts--gods, goddesses, spirits (both good and bad) ...
-Life Subject To Law. Continued
Hygienists taught that the laws of human organization must be as exact or precise in their power and authority as laws which govern inanimate things. We expect to see the sun rise and set, a seed to s...
-Chapter VII Instruments Of Action
Life is an essence that tumbles and pours from its source in creative action and brings into being an infinite variety of forms and kinds of existence. It is the source of the sublime and magnificent,...
-Chapter VIII What Is Health?
It is a sad commentary upon our educational system that, however well informed our people may be upon most matters that affect their lives, they are generally very ignorant upon all subjects that pert...
-What Is Health? Continued
If we try to picture health, what do we see? A form of perfect symmetry and proportion; a clean, smooth, semi-transparent skin, with the red blood shining through, especially in the cheeks and ends of...
-Chapter IX The Ways Of Health
The grandest desiderium in the twentieth century, surpassing in value all other discoveries that may be made in this or any succeeding century, is a true and reliable science of health or, more proper...
-The Ways Of Health. Part 2
It is a very deplorable aspect of our life that where we need to be thoughtful, we are thoughtless; heedful, we are heedless; cautious, we are risky; comprehensive, we are foolish; where there ought t...
-The Ways Of Health. Part 3
No diet, no oxygen, no sunshine, will produce vital operations in a corpse. Everything we do, whether well or sick, must be subservient to the power of life. Food is valuable only in connection with t...
-Chapter X Hygiene
Hygiene is properly defined as that branch of biology which designates the conditions upon which health depends and the means by which it may be sustained in all its virtue and purity while we have it...
-Hygiene. Part 2
Hygienic means health preserving. Practically, it implies the observance of the laws of life. It pertains to the integrity of everything that lives. It applies to the vegetable and animal kingdoms as ...
-Hygiene. Part 3
The Hygienic System embraces all the laws of life. It does not consist, as many suppose, of merely eating certain types of food, or of fasting, but in the observance of all the important principles up...
-Chapter XI Materia Hygienica
In the public mind there is not a little confusion on the subject of Hygiene. Both its advocates and its opponents often do it nearly the same injustice. In this chapter we hope to make quite clear wh...
-Materia Hygienica. Part 2
The means of Hygiene are common in their nature and prevalence and are as generally adapted to the uses of life under all conditions and circumstances, as the air we breathe. They are adapted both to ...
-Materia Hygienica. Part 3
The Hygienic System embraces every directly beneficial substance and condition known and rejects nothing that nature does not also reject. Let us fly to the rich and bountiful resources of nature, as ...
-Materia Hygienica. Part 4
It is a very mistaken idea, not unfrequently a fatal one, possessed by the people, that something different is needed to restore the sick person to health than is needed to keep him well when he is we...
-Materia Hygienica. Part 5
At first glance, the superficial observer is likely to think that Hygienic means are too few in number, that a thing as complex as life and the seemingly more complex thing called disease, will certai...
-Chapter XII The Primordial Requisites Of Life
It is one of the outstanding disgraces of medicine that for centuries it practically neglected the primordial requisites of organic existence and failed to supply these in any adequate manner to eithe...
-Sunlight
The one universal natural Hygienic influence that man has most denied himself is sunshine. Inhabiting a system, as we do, of which the sun is the center and the chief source of heat, light and energy,...
-Oxygen
Air is the source of oxygen. A constant supply of oxygen is essential to life. Deprived of air, man dies in a few minutes. Yet, at the time that Graham, Jennings, Alcott, Trall, Gove, Nichols, Taylor ...
-Water
The presence of water is essential to the performance of the processes of assimilation and those of excretion. Indeed, all the chemico-vital processes or changes that take place in the living body req...
-Bathing
During the Dark Ages, Western man ceased to bathe. In America, up to the time of Graham, people did not take baths. They had no bath tubs and did not regard bodily cleanliness as a necessity of life. ...
-Exercise
Exercise (physical activity) is a requisite of health, strength and development throughout the animal kingdom. Full development cannot be achieved without it. How suicidal, then, for us to cramp our b...
-Rest And Sleep
As essential to life as is exercise is the need for periods of rest and sleep. It is during periods of relaxation and repose that the body repairs itself and reinvigorates itself and prepares itself f...
-Chapter XIII Food
What is a food? What is nutrition? Nutrition is a vital process that is carried on only in living organisms. It is a process of development, growth, repair and invigoration. In a complex organism vari...
-Food. Part 2
The real argument lies deeper; it lies in the relation of these minerals (inorganic matters) to the living system. If they are usable, they are useful; if not, they are injurious. Physiology reveals t...
-Food. Part 3
Man is not constituted for a carnivorous diet and if it were true that flesh foods provided greater nutriment than other foods, flesh-eaters should be relatively small eaters; but such is not the case...
-Food. Part 4
Today we read and hear much about the medicinal properties of fruits, as if there are some elements in oranges, apples, pears, grapes, etc., that make them part of the druggist's stock-in-trade. It ...
-Food. Part 5
Hygienists also eschewed the eating of condiments. Their position was a simple one: namely, wholesome foods are agreeable to the normal (undepraved or unperverted) taste. But so habituated are our peo...
-Chapter XIV Salt Eating
Who was the first man to decry man's habit of eating salt? We cannot answer this question definitely. Sylvester Graham is the earliest writer we have found who condemned the taking of sodium chloride ...
-Chapter XV One Man's Meat
Some of Graham's more moderate contemporary critics said that he wrote sensibly on the Science of Life, and laid down rules very well adapted to some constitutions. His error consisted in making a on...
-Chapter XVI Eating
It is important not only to eat those foods that are best adapted to the human constitution and to eat them properly prepared, but also to eat them in ways that assure the best results in digestion. A...
-Eating. Part 2
We have an elaborate organ, evidently adapted to serve very important functions, equipped with millions of microscopic glands that pour their secretions into the stomach and these adapted to secure ce...
-Eating. Part 3
The same law should govern man's eating as governs the eating of all other creatures: that is, eat what is most desired of nature's organic compounds and eat no others. Man violates this law when he e...
-Chapter XVII Self-Healing
Man has been on the earth along time--how long we do not know. The period of prehistory may be much longer than the historic period. A medical profession has existed for only a small part of the histo...
-Chapter XVIII The Essential Nature Of Disease
What is disease? The whole philosophy of drug medication or of Hygienic care turns on this single question. It is quite clear that until medical men can solve this problem--what is disease--medical sc...
-The Essential Nature Of Disease. Part 2
Only by obliterating all distinctions between health and disease can such actions be called healthy actions. This would be something like obliterating the distinctions between heat and cold and decl...
-The Essential Nature Of Disease. Part 3
Writing in 1850, Houghton, discussing the action of the body in disease, said, in the words of Dr. Jennings, that action is right action. The convulsive and often painful movements of the bowels in ...
-The Essential Nature Of Disease. Part 4
Graham's view of the essential nature of disease is well summed up in his statement that all parts (of the body) sympathise with the suffering organ, and by a general consentaneousness of action, str...
-The Essential Nature Of Disease. Part 5
If disease is a remedial effort, why do not the sick recover? The answer to this perfectly logical question is: sick people do get well. They get well in all cases, except three. These are: In ...
-Chapter XIX The Occasions For Disease
Our ancestors said that sickness was of God, but there were also among them those who asserted that it was of the Devil. This is a delusional etiology; it has no relation to reality. The men of scienc...
-The Occasions For Disease. Part 2
Lowered functioning power, a state which we call enervation, inhibits secretion and excretion, resulting in a slow accumulation of body waste in the fluids and tissues of the organism. Medical science...
-The Occasions For Disease. Part 3
Imprudencies in diet are perhaps, often more than anything else, responsible for indigestion, so-called biliousness, diarrhea, gas, gastric discomfort, heart burn, and a host of other symptoms of ...
-The Occasions For Disease. Part 4
One of the best lessons any of us can learn is that in all essential particulars we are but counterparts of every other member of the human family. We have the same organs and functions, the same basi...
-Chapter XX The Unity Of Disease
We are confronted with a woman who has been sick for years and has suffered many things of many physicians. She has asthma, colitis, a gastric ulcer, neuritis, inflammation of the neck of the womb (...
-Chapter XXI Evolution Of Disease
Dr. Jennings was not the first to suggest the unity of disease, but he was undoubtedly the first to apply the principle of evolution to pathology. Since his day it has been the Hygienic position that ...
-Evolution Of Disease. Continued
Between the first cold of infancy and death from cancer in middle life, there are intermediate complexes and symptoms galore--colds, coughs, sore throats, constipation, diarrhea, headache, tired feeli...
-Chapter XXII Not A Cure
In the Transactions of the State Medical Society of Michigan for 1872 (pp. 85-6) are the following significant words: Every intelligent physician feels the want of a science of therapeutics. All the ...
-Not A Cure. Part 2
Another example that graphically illustrates the current use of the term cure is that of the search for a cure for cancer. At this writing it is being freely and frequently predicted, both in this cou...
-Not A Cure. Part 3
One of the most essential things that we need to accomplish today to further the dissemination of the principles of Hygiene and the consequent promotion of human health is to dispel the still prevalen...
-Chapter XXIII Hygiene Not A Cure
Is it really true that you can cure disease without the use of medicines? asked a doting old lady of a Hygienic practitioner. The Hygienic answer to this question is that diseases should not be cure...
-Hygiene Not A Cure. Continued
Tilden tells us that he practiced medicine and surgery for 25 years, experimenting, after the first ten years, more or less, with all the systems and cults, and being more and more surprised with the...
-Chapter XXIV Conditions Of Recovery
Hygiene is based squarely upon the principle that health is intended to be, and therefore should be, the ruling condition of human life; biological laws are designed to operate as certainly within the...
-Conditions Of Recovery. Part 2
In order that a substance may be truly metabolized by the body it must be susceptible of being transformed into cell substance. Any substance, the relation of which to the living organism is a poison,...
-Conditions Of Recovery. Part 3
There is a vast difference between a plan of care based on removal of cause and one that is based on palliation of effects. As there can be no effect without a cause, it is essential that the cause be...
-Conditions Of Recovery. Part 4
Medical men do not inquire into the ways of life of their patients and do not rebuke them for their violations of the laws of life; they do not teach their patients how to live--instead, they seek to ...
-Conditions Of Recovery. Part 5
The accumulation of functioning power is a fact to be accomplished with the same certainty that pertains to the storage of electricity in a storage battery. Functioning power can be accumulated--store...
-Chapter XXV Hygienic Care Of The Sick
The Hygienic System grew directly out of the effort of men trained in physiological science to create a system of mind-body care, both in health and in sickness, that was founded on the principles of ...
-Hygienic Care Of The Sick. Part 2
Were a man sick with typhoid fever, during the last century, his physician would dose him with several kinds of drugs, all in 24 hours. What, after that, was the physician likely to know of the ordina...
-Hygienic Care Of The Sick. Part 3
We demand the employment of the normal means of preserving life and of unfolding the physiological capacities of man. The great question with the reader is simply this: will these means of Hygiene rec...
-Hygienic Care Of The Sick. Part 4
It is a significant fact that the hazard from the ignorant employment of Hygiene is small when contrasted with that which accompanies the most scientific employment of the most popular drugs. One may ...
-Chapter XXVI Application Of Hygiene
The patient has pneumonia and we seek to care for him Hygienically. We give him enough food to meet the normal demands of nutrition, provide as much water as thirst demands, give him plenty of air to ...
-Application Of Hygiene. Part 2
How are pathological conditions removed by hygienic remedies? asked Dr. Gorton. Replying to her own question, she stated: 1st. By a normal supply of those agents by which life is preserved and main...
-Application Of Hygiene. Part 3
When we fully understand that Hygienic means do not act on the system, but are used by the body in virtue of their fitness to serve its vital needs, then we will understand that the needs of two sick ...
-Chapter XXVII Acute Disease
Acute is a Latin word equivalent to our word sharp. An acute disease is a short, sharp illness. The symptoms are commonly severe and there is fever, but the disease does not last long. As a general t...
-Acute Disease. Part 2
I think it significant that no complications or unfavorable symptoms developed in these undrugged cases, although these were the rule under the drugging plan. It is true that physicians have tried t...
-Acute Disease. Part 3
Trall said of pneumonia: The pain in the lungs may be very severe, the cough extremely violent, the breathing exceedingly distressing, the fever intense and the patient utterly prostrated, with no da...
-Chapter XXVIII Fasting
Although fasting has been practiced by both man and animals since the origin of life on earth and there has never been a time within this period when it has not been employed, the professional use of ...
-Fasting. Part 2
The importance which Trall attached to fasting in fevers may be gleaned from his statement that: We can easily explain the seeming value of the article (Extractum Carnis was claimed to possess extrao...
-Fasting. Part 3
Total abstinence from all food was again enjoined . . . How terribly strange, he exclaims, that physicians generally will not make themselves acquainted with . . . abstinence! Writing in this...
-Fasting. Part 4
In the January 9, 1875 issue of The Science of Health, Trall reproduced a letter from a correspondent, who after thanking him for his letter of advice says: I immediately commenced a protracted fast,...
-Chapter XXIX The Suppression Of Disease
We have defined remedial action as the sum total of all those modifications of function (diminutions and dramatic exaggerations) and structure designed to resist and expel injurious substances and to ...
-Chapter XXX Convalescence
The advantages and superiority of Hygienic care over drug treatment are shown as much by the rapid convalescence as by the speed of recovery. Proper care of the invalid is Hygienic care and calls for ...
-Chapter XXXI Chronic Disease
In their very nature, acute diseases are evanescent. On the other hand, chronic diseases are of long standing. Chronic disease is of no speedy termination, but it is not nearly as devoid of remedial p...
-Chronic Disease. Continued
The symptoms of worms will differ a little according to the kind, and the locality they infect. Generally, we can enumerate a leaden countenance, bad breath, red lips, picking at the nose, tumid abdo...
-Chapter XXXII Crises
There are those who employ Hygienic care who have generally acquired the idea in some way that health is to be restored through some kind of experience that has received the technical appellation of c...
-Crises. Continued
Jennings and Graham did not discuss crises and must have thought very little of them. Alcott, also, ignores their supposed need. I once asked Dr. Tilden what he thought of this assumed need for crises...
-Chapter XXXIII Feeding In Disease
In an age when everybody is demanding a diet that will cure them of their various maladies, it may be idle to say that a fast, rest in bed and giving up enervating habits will enable the body to resto...
-Chapter XXXIV Recovery Of Vigor
The living body is organized for the performance of function. Function is its great purpose, the normal and vigorous performance of which constitutes health; it is only when abnormal action occurs, co...
-Chapter XXXV Palliation
Medically, things were never worse for the world. Discussing arthritis, a television commercial says: There is no cure, but there is anacin . . . It was then explained how anacin provides temporary...
-Palliation. Part 2
Just so long as our pleasure-crazed and self-indulgent people can be made to believe that disease is something apart from their daily life--germs or viruses or something over which they have no contro...
-Palliation. Part 3
He who demands a correction of the ways of life as the one and only means of securing a restoration of health will not be patronized by the millions who still believe that among the myriads of so-call...
-Chapter XXXVI The Time Factor In Recovery
One of the most trying problems of the Hygienist, in dealing with the sick, and this is particularly true of chronic sufferers, is the demand for speedy results. Everybody wants to get well in a hurry...
-Chapter XXXVII The Tragedy Of Irreversibility
Chronic sufferers are frequently told that their disease is incurable. For those of us who do not believe that any so-called disease is curable or that there is any such thing as a cure, the whole con...
-The Tragedy Of Irreversibility. Continued
Irreversibility is often due entirely to the fact that the original and sustaining causes of disease (to which drug poisoning is merely an addition) are not corrected or removed. No case of sickness s...
-Chapter XXXVIII The Prevention Of Disease
Health by healthful living, was the slogan of the early Hygienists. This slogan stressed the fact that the preservation of health and the prevention of disease are identical processes and involve th...
-The Prevention Of Disease. Continued
So far as the profession's present-day valid contribution to disease prevention is concerned, it consists in supervising the sanitary institutions of our cities and states. This is not enough. As impo...
-Chapter XXXIX The Prevention Of Epidemics
An epidemic is mass sickness. In all epidemics, the so-called epidemic disease is but one among several symptom complexes presented by the sick. For example, in the 1918-19 influenza-pneumonia pandemi...
-The Prevention Of Epidemics. Part 2
If we grant to Metchnikoff the truth of his premise, that extinct species have been killed off by parasites, we are faced with the need to determine why some species succumb to the attacks of parasite...
-The Prevention Of Epidemics. Part 3
Diptheria: benignant; malignant Scarlatina: simplex, anginose, or malignant Measles: benignant or common; malignant or black The condition of one's blood or of the system generally explains also mo...
-Chapter XL The New Human Redemption
Since the morning stars first sang together no single event has occurred in this earth of ours more significant in its nature and more instructive in its consequences than the rebirth of Hygiene. Hygi...
-The New Human Redemption. Continued
The more we compare the condition of the people of the present with that of the people of the past, the more we dwell on a reasonable hope of better conditions in the future, the more dissatisfied we ...
-Chapter XLI Medicine And Hygiene Contrasted
One of two things is true. The drug system is either right or wrong. If right, the Hygienic System is wrong. The issue is plain. There is no middle ground. The two systems are essentially antagonistic...
-Medicine And Hygiene Contrasted. Part 2
Although every school of so-called healing insists that it is working for the betterment of the health conditions of mankind, their works all demonstrate that, however successful they may claim to be ...
-Medicine And Hygiene Contrasted. Part 3
Hygiene has changed all this. In Hygiene, the first step towards restoring the body to health is enlightenment of the sick. The best foundation for a belief in Hygiene is a thorough knowledge of physi...
-Medicine And Hygiene Contrasted. Part 4
Worse than the foregoing, if this is possible, was the habit of charging Hygiene with responsibility for death if a patient, far gone under wrong living and worse treatment, was not brought back from ...
-Chapter XLII What Is A Poison?
What is a poison? What is a medicine? How do drugs act on the living organism? It is vitally important that we distinguish scientifically between food and poison, because they are confounded in the po...
-What Is A Poison? Part 2
It will now be readily seen that drugs interrupt the functional harmony of the body, first, by their chemical incompatibility, and second, by their non-usableness, which renders their immediate remova...
-What Is A Poison? Part 3
We are told that recent studies suggest that enzymes which metabolize drugs are not the usual enzymes of intermediary metabolism. Rather, it is speculated that they are the results of evolutionary dev...
-What Is A Poison? Part 4
Can a logical reason be provided why a person should swallow or permit to be sent into his blood and tissues by injection, a nauseous, noxious substance because he is sick? No such reason has ever bee...
-Chapter XLIII Drug Relations
Hygienists affirm that all medical systems, wherever and whenever practiced and by whatever names they are called, whose remedial agents are drugs, are false in conception, absurd in science, contrary...
-Drug Relations. Continued
Every substance in the earth has a definite relation to the living organism--either it may be used to build and maintain the organism and carry on its functions, or it may not. If it is usable, it is ...
-Chapter XLIV Biodynamics Vs. Pharmacodynamics
For generations it has been asserted that drugs, food, drink, etc., act upon the living organism and that disease is a something which seizes upon the organism and seeks its destruction; in a word, it...
-Biodynamics Vs. Pharmacodynamics. Part 2
During the more than one hundred and fourteen years that have slipped into the past since the foregoing quotation was published, chemistry and physics have undergone radical revolutions. Two whole new...
-Biodynamics Vs. Pharmacodynamics. Part 3
Trall's premise was simply that the alleged remedial agents of the medical system do not act upon the living system, but that those effects which were called remedial result wholly from the action of ...
-Biodynamics Vs. Pharmacodynamics. Part 4
Pharmacologists speak of the effects of drugs and the actions of drugs as one and the same thing and tell us that the duration of action of a drug depends in part on the extent to which it becomes loc...
-Biodynamics Vs. Pharmacodynamics. Part 5
If, as we contend, the body acts against drugs, as it acts against all injurious substances, all incompatibilities, all poisons, then the inevitable inference, that no sophistry can destroy, follows t...
-Biodynamics Vs. Pharmacodynamics. Part 6
The chemical combination of drugs with plasma constituents and with cell constituents cannot explain the alleged actions of drugs, for the reason that these combinations render action impossible. It w...
-Biodynamics Vs. Pharmacodynamics. Part 7
Suppose we apply drugs to a dead organism, which, as we know, is a bundle of useless inertia: will there be any action? No action whatever will be perceived, simply because the presence of the drug wi...
-Biodynamics Vs. Pharmacodynamics. Part 8
Emetics occasion inflammation of the stomach, a determination of blood and nerve supply to those structures involved in ejecting the emetic from the stomach, all to protect the membranes of the stomac...
-Biodynamics Vs. Pharmacodynamics. Part 9
This question would have more logic to it if it were asked concerning the drug rather than the body. If drugs exert their alleged remedial influences according to the known laws of chemistry, why do w...
-Chapter XLV Drug Indulgences
The prevalent habit of drug taking is a potent cause of disease. Not only do drugs cause disease, but their use causes a neglect of the primary causes of disease. Hygienists have, to use the words of ...
-Chapter XLVI The Evils Of Drug Medication
In an editorial in the July 1873 issue of The Science of Health, Trall said: Disease being an effort of the vital organism to restore the normal state, the causes which necessitate that effort should...
-The Evils Of Drug Medication. Part 2
When we read of the procedures and discoveries of modern scientific medicine, whether we read the news accounts or the accounts in the medical journals, reports and standard texts, one thing stands ou...
-The Evils Of Drug Medication. Part 3
Poisons kill; that is their nature. This is known to all. To say that a substance is poisonous is not to awaken a recognition that it has as one of its essential properties, one that preserves health ...
-The Evils Of Drug Medication. Part 4
Drugs simply produce a series of complications--drug diseases. Hence, the more a physician medicates a family, the more they demand to be drugged. After he has had the management of a case for a year ...
-The Evils Of Drug Medication. Part 5
Medical students, studying in their materia medica what are designated the properties of all the poisons of the three kingdoms of nature and firmly believing everything they read of the medicinal prop...
-The Evils Of Drug Medication. Part 6
It may be questioned whether all drugs are more or less cumulative, but it is certain that all strong ones are. It is well known to medical men that many drugs are expelled with great difficulty and o...
-Chapter XLVII Iatrogenic Diseases
It has been made abundantly clear in preceding pages that every drug is a poison and every dose of every drug produces disease. A new drug is simply a new poison and gives rise to a new disease. The p...
-Iatrogenic Diseases. Part 2
Due to their intrinsically toxic qualities, all drugs, even the least toxic of them, suppress symptoms, build complications, produce chronic disease and tend to kill. Most of the deaths in acute disea...
-Iatrogenic Diseases. Part 3
But a lack of cures is the minor part of the story. The great flood of side effects and iatrogenic diseases resulting from drugs has brought the profession to the point where they can say to the young...
-Chapter XLVIII Herbs
Medical men long held and many do yet seem to hold that nature has provided remedies for disease, that there is a law of cure. To provide remedies, instead of requiring obedience, would be to break ...
-Herbs. Part 2
People who believe in the curative power of herbs seem to think that they grow only to be steeped, compounded, desiccated, extracted, inspissated, concentrated and swallowed as medicine. Each herb is ...
-Herbs. Part 3
The vegetable alkaloid reserpine (which first came to the attention of the English speaking world as rauwolfia serpentine) was first used to reduce blood pressure. Then it became a wonder drug in th...
-Chapter XLIX A New Revolutionary Situation
A new revolutionary situation is rapidly building up to a climax. Within the past 70 years medicine has undergone a vast surface transformation. In America the physio-medical, eclectic and homeopathic...
-A New Revolutionary Situation. Part 2
Numerous surveys made by leading medical men themselves have revealed that there is a definite danger involved in entering a hospital. The mayhem in the hospitals is matched by the fact that 15 to 20 ...
-A New Revolutionary Situation. Part 3
What is not generally realized, even among Hygienists, is the rapidity with which the crisis in the drugging business is coming to a climax. To the flood of wonder drugs, their effects in causing a wh...
-Chapter L Opposition
What new truths, reforms and revolutions, though ever so beautiful and practical, have ever received public approval when first promulgated? Which of them has not been forced to contend with the combi...
-Opposition. Part 2
Oh! what a noble profession is this! Reared and nourished in a free country, where every institution is founded upon the broad basis of free thought, we have in our midst a noble profession that, to p...
-Opposition. Part 3
Opposition takes strange forms and resorts to devious means to achieve its end. But one hardly expects a respected member of the medical profession, who is also a professor in one of the world's leadi...
-Opposition. Part 4
To make it mean a pretender to knowledge and skill that one does not possess makes it cover the entire healing profession, regular and irregular, from Hippocrates to the present. However well meaning ...
-Chapter LI College
At the first convention of the American Hygienic and Hydropathic Association, held in 1850, the majority of the members present thought it wise that all future members of the society should have recei...
-Chapter LII Women And Hygiene
The practice of medicine was a male monopoly. Medical colleges would not admit female students. Practicing physicians rejected all applications from females who wished to serve an apprenticeship in me...
-Women And Hygiene. Continued
Hygienists espoused many causes, but the Hygienic movement was no mere loose collection of reform movements and measures such as vegetarianism, temperance, clothing reform, sex education of the yo...
-Chapter LIII Who Was A Hygienist?
With the exceptions of Sylvester Graham and Mary Gove, the earlier Hygienists were all medical men, coming from one or the other of the four medical schools (allopathy, homeopathy, physio-medicalism, ...
-Chapter LIV Hygienists
Writing in June 1861, Dr. M. Augusta Fairchild said: The Hygienic physician will labor in the cause, even if starvation stares him in the face. She says that when she left college, it was her deter...
-Hygienists. Continued
It is a common error that radical Hygienists cannot secure favor and patronage; hence, the unstable seek a refuge in therapeutics. Various modalities suit a weak-minded practitioner and, as a natural ...
-Eclecticism
Almost from its origin there have been eclectics in the medical profession. As the various schools of medicine arose and competed with each other for popular favor and acceptance, there were men who a...
-Compromise
All men and all philosophies find their level; for after their kind, things tend to flock together. Ours is an age of compromise, of half measures. We choose the lesser of two evils instead of seeki...
-Chapter LV Mistakes Of Hygienists
We have previously pointed out that a series of individuals, perhaps even of ages, are required for the full development and culmination of a great thought. Each individual and each age provides furth...
-Mistakes Of Hygienists. Part 2
There is not in nature, they said, any law of reversion. Results are produced only by appropriate means and effects always correspond to causes. Good cannot be accomplished by evil agencies, nor ev...
-Mistakes Of Hygienists. Part 3
To reduce this assumed danger, they sought to regulate the vital struggle so that the circulation was kept nearly balanced. It was thought to be necessary to maintain the balance of circulation in ord...
-Mistakes Of Hygienists. Part 4
Trall thought of electricity as a means of controlling and directing the remedial activities of the body. He said: It is capable of exciting motion or action in muscular fibers and of determining vit...
-Mistakes Of Hygienists. Part 5
Religion still had a strong hold upon the imagination of the people and we should not be surprised to learn that many Hygienists, including Dr. Jackson, who was a minister, Dr. Nichols and Mary Gove, ...
-Mistakes Of Hygienists. Part 6
This example will provide the reader with a faint idea of the absurdity of trying to express the principles of a great scientific method of mind-body care that is founded in nature and, therefore, int...
-Chapter LVI Future Of Hygiene
With a few bright passages of sunshine, the picture of the past of man has been a gloomy one. It is darkened all over with horrors. Poor, sick, ignorant, enslaved, crushed with bigotries, maddened wit...
-Future Of Hygiene. Continued
We cannot look to the leaders and practitioners of the newer schools of so-called healing to lead the people into truth and health--they do not know the truth themselves. They are opportunists, frauds...







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