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The New Book Of Golf | by Horace G. Hutchinson



Mr. Croome, as a professional instructor of youth, was allowed a free hand to tell people how to learn, how to use the teachers' lessons, but all the other writers were first given Mr. Darwin's MS. for their study and their text on which to say their own say as a commentary, yet without prohibiting them all liberty to give their private views expression.

TitleThe New Book Of Golf
AuthorHorace G. Hutchinson
PublisherLongmans, Green, And Co.
Year1912
Copyright1912, Longmans, Green, And Co.
AmazonThe new book on golf

Edited By Horace G. Hutchinson

With Contributions From Mrs. Ross (Nee Miss May Hezlet), Bernard Darwin, James Sherlock, A. C. M. Croome, And C. K. Hutchison

Illustrated By Photographs

The New Book Of Golf
-Editor's Foreword
There is no need of foreword from me to appraise the team that has done the work of this book. The names tell their good tale. All I want to say is a word about the manner in which the work was done. ...
-Prologue. How To Learn
By A. C. M. Croome There are many who hold that Golf, being an Art and not a Science, cannot be learnt from books. These never tire of narrating the fable of the Open Champion and the Casual Strange...
-Prologue. How To Learn. Part 2
JOHN BALL, Junr. (Eight times Amateur Champion, once Open Champion). [Frontispiece The educational value of Sir Walter's recommendation lies in the fact that it is in some sort an appeal to Nature...
-Prologue. How To Learn. Part 3
Having arrived at a definition of 'hit,' we may with propriety try to discover the exact meaning of the term swing. In the last paragraph it was said that, so far as either hand produces swing, the le...
-Prologue. How To Learn. Part 4
I once started a beginner at golf in the way which I here recommend, and I think I shall best serve the purpose which I have in view by describing our procedure in detail. Our first object was to lear...
-Prologue. How To Learn. Part 5
Here I permit myself to digress, because the ludicrously wrong ideas about ' Vardon's Push-shot' held by many persons aptly illustrate an important point in this chapter, videlicet that the general ac...
-Part I. Elementary Instruction
By Bernard Darwin Preliminary Note A numbeb of educational works have been written on golf, many of them by highly distinguished persons. On certain points these authorities have differed considerab...
-Chapter I. Driving. (A) First Principles Of The Swing
There are two rather different systems on which instruction may be imparted in the art of driving. In one the victim is first of all carefully placed in position by means of a foot-rule, while an exha...
-Driving. (A) First Principles Of The Swing. Part 2
Now, it may turn out that he finds that in both instances he is doing the right and not the wrong thing; if that is so, he is very lucky, and has avoided one considerable difficulty by the light of na...
-Driving. (A) First Principles Of The Swing. Part 3
DRIVING: TOP OF SWING.. [To face p. 37. If the head and the imaginary axis behave themselves, there is nothing desperately difficult about the body movement; nothing, indeed, comparable in difficu...
-(B) The Stance
When dealing with the elementary principles of the driving swing, the position of the feet was dismissed in rather cavalier fashion. It must, however, be faced, and with it the golfer is confronted wi...
-(B) The Stance. Part 2
And now, having poured a broadside of abuse into the old stance, let us attack the new or open stance. The gravamen of the charge against it is that it causes the club to be taken up too vertically, ...
-(B) The Stance. Part 3
Since so much must depend on the lie of the club head and also on the length of the shaft, it would be futile to lay down any rule in feet and inches, and no better guide - though it is of course only...
-(C) The Follow-Through
In the dim future perhaps some post-impressionist golfer may arise and declare that the follow-through is not only unnecessary, but actually harmful. At present, however, no one, so far as I am aware,...
-(D) Some Further Points In Driving
In trying to deal with the elements of driving I treated the turning movement of the left wrist as the foundation of a true swing, which I believe it to be. The player was vehemently exhorted to acqui...
-(D) Some Further Points In Driving. Continued
There are, of course, some very fine golfers who do let the club slide, but to do so must, as one would think, add to the difficulty of their task. The chances of losing control over the club must be ...
-Chapter II. Through The Green With Wooden Clubs
Wooden club play through the green is not, it must be sorrowfully admitted, what it once was. The glory has in a measure departed from it, not because golfers are less skilful, but because they have f...
-Chapter III. The Spoon
No review of wooden club play would to-day be complete without some mention of the spoon, which, after being buried for a while in comparative oblivion, has now become exceedingly fashionable and popu...
-Chapter IV. With Iron Clubs
Most of us, if we practise at all, go in for what may be called the two extremes of golf, driving and putting, and leave our iron play to take care of itself. This it does, as a rule, in a highly inef...
-With Iron Clubs. Continued
They will be played, for the most part, with the cleek, or alternatively the driving-mashie, or also occasionally with the driving-iron. Whether a man plays with a cleek or a driving-mashie is, one ma...
-(A) The Half-Shot
We have been talking about the half-shot as if it were played purely with the iron, but the shot can, of course, be played with various other clubs. It can be played very profitably with a cleek, alth...
-(B) The Mashie
We now leave the iron and come to the mashie, with which the shorter and more delicate part of approaching is to be done. It may be well to begin with a general word of caution, and that is, there sho...
-(C) The Run-Up
So much for getting the ball into the air. There remains the task, which at first sight would appear to be a great deal easier, of making it run along the ground. I am inclined to think it is in fact ...
-Chapter V. In Hazards
Of any beginner in golf, however eminent he may be in other walks of life, it may be assumed, and that without insulting him, that he will sooner or later get into a bunker. Even if he never make a ba...
-In Hazards. Continued
I have used the word chop, but I recognise that herein lurks some danger of a misunderstanding, because the art of chopping rather implies that the chopper should stand well over the choppee, as the e...
-Chapter VI. Putting
' What mighty ills have not been done by putting? Destructive, damnable, deceitful putting?' So might the golfer exclaim, adapting the words of Otway, who was, I regret to say, ungallant enough to ap...
-Putting. Part 2
So much for the grip, and now as to the club, which may be made of wood, aluminium, or iron. Clubs of wood and aluminium I propose to class together, an action blasphemous and indecent in the eyes of ...
-Putting. Part 3
For some mysterious reason it appears that, whatever may be done in theory, in practice the work cannot be equally apportioned between the two wrists. If their owner craves advice as to which should d...
-(A) The Putting Stance
Having said a good deal about the actual way of putting, I may now deal more briefly with the attitude in which that hitting is to be done. On the main question, which is that of stance, there may alm...
-(B) On Taking The Line
So much for the stroke itself. Perhaps it is a great deal too much, and yet the subject is so difficult and mysterious that there are doubtless enormous tracts both of knowledge and speculation that I...
-(C) Of Stymies
The excessive violence of those who advocate the abolition of the stymie sometimes drives those who defend it into the use of language that is likewise excessive. The abolitionists talk as if no stymi...
-Chapter VII. On Faults In General
Every golfer is at times out of form, either generally or particularly, as regards some one club or stroke. Even the rawest beginner will fall at times perceptibly below his necessarily humble standar...
-On Faults In General. Continued
'I knew I should get you out,' said a famous and insidious old slow bowler to a young batsman. 'Yes,' said the batsman, ' but I got eighty runs first.' So here, too, it is a question of counting the...
-(A) Particular Faults
I have dealt with faults in general, and I now come to particular faults, and first of all to those which beset the driver. Of these the first and most elementary is doubtless that of topping; to the ...
-(A) Particular Faults. Part 2
The slicer proper does not dunt his ball into the ground; rather does he sky it too high into the air. This he achieves by cutting more or less outrageously across the ball and finishing with his hand...
-(A) Particular Faults. Part 3
As regards the fault of hurrying, it is perhaps more fatally easy to fall into it while playing a half-shot than in any other stroke. When the player is taking a full swing, the fact of his taking the...
-Part II. From The Professional's Point Of View. Chapter I. Educational
By J. Sherlock There must be no confusion on one point. This article is written from the point of view of a professional golfer, who quite expects that a considerable number of his brethren will emph...
-(A) Coaching
Certainly the most important duty a professional has to perform for the club that employs him is that of 'giving instruction ' to the members, and as this is so important I ask no pardon for giving an...
-(A) Coaching. Part 2
In that illustration is to be found the secret of all successful coaching, and if any reader sees in this only the system of laisser-faire, he is wrong. It is meant to convey a very different idea. I...
-(A) Coaching. Part 3
(1) There are many points of style which are essential to effective play. (2) There is practical unanimity among golfers on recognising the effect of the presence or absence of most of these. The th...
-Chapter II. My Own Game
The editor expressed a desire that I should write something about my own game - the way I play the different shots, and my reason for so doing, that is if I can discover any special reason. It will be...
-(A) The Swing
Imagine that you have gripped the club comfortably, taken up your stance and feel quite satisfied, and that the ball is teed ready for you to drive. Now comes the serious business of swinging or hitti...
-(B) Iron Clubs
The cleek I play with a full swing, only because I cannot get the distance required without. With the rest of the iron clubs I find my grip and stance slightly altered. I stand with the ball much near...
-(C) Wrist Action
I feel that I ought here to state concisely and as clearly as I can my opinion about wrist action. No part of the golf stroke seems to me to be less understood or to cause so much confusion; no doubt ...
-(D) Putting
Putting, writes Vardon, is a 'game within a game,' and he might have added that the game within is greater than the game without. He also says that you cannot teach a man to putt, which I hold to be p...
-Chapter III. Clubs - Their Selection And Purchase
It goes without saying that something must be written about the implements of the game - the selection and purchase of clubs, etc., and although the professional's point of view may be justly consider...
-Clubs - Their Selection And Purchase. Continued
It is an all too common sight to find keen golfers assiduously practising with a club that is built for an entirely different style from their own. Think of the years some people spend before they hav...
-Chapter IV. Temperament And Other Matters
When the last word has been written about the right and the wrong club to play with, and the wisest way to select them, and when the pupil has been carefully and well informed as to the best and most ...
-Temperament And Other Matters. Continued
I could fill many pages with curious and startling examples. Of course, the man who is clearly lacking gets found out in the first trial or so, and gives little trouble, except that he invariably beco...
-Part III. Men Of Genius
By C. K. Hutchison Men Of Genius Genius has been defined as 'the infinite capacity for taking pains,' and the definition is certainly a happy one when applied to golf, for no one can hope to excel a...
-Part III. Men Of Genius. Part 2
When Arnaud Massy won the championship at Hoylake in 1907, he only fulfilled the prophecies of those best qualified to judge his qualities. The severe weather conditions which prevailed on that occasi...
-Part III. Men Of Genius. Part 3
R. Thompson is another player who, like Sayers, learnt his golf at North Berwick. He is a steady, consistent player, who only lacks that little extra power which seems necessary to the winning of cham...
-Part III. Men Of Genius. Part 4
Scotland has certainly never produced a finer all-round athlete than Mr. Leslie Balfour Melville. An international football player, the best bat in Scotland, he also won the Scottish lawn-tennis champ...
-Part III. Men Of Genius. Part 5
The late Dr. A. J. T. Allan was almost unknown as a golfer when he won the amateur championship at Muirfield in 1897. His sad death from pneumonia, a few months later, prevented confirmation of the gr...
-Part III. Men Of Genius. Part 6
If Mr. Lassen gained a surprise victory in 1908, it was nothing as compared with Mr. Gordon Barry's win at Prestwick in 1905, as he was practically unknown away from St. Andrews. That is not to be won...
-Part III. Men Of Genius. Part 7
Mr. J. B. Pease is another example of the square stance and ball opposite left foot style. He relies on a pull for his length, but is straighter, though not quite as long, as Mr. de Zoete, the result ...
-Part III. Men Of Genius. Part 8
Mr. L. B. Stevens leapt into sudden prominence at Prestwick in 1911 by reaching the semi-final, and, but for an unfortunate misunderstanding with respect to a local rule, might have attained even high...
-Part IV. From The Ladies' Point Of View. From The Ladies' Point of View
The growth of women's golf has been extraordinary. As a recent writer put it, 'Even twenty years ago a woman walking in a London street, attired in short tweed coat and skirt, thick boots and carrying...
-Chapter I. Driving
In no department of women's golf has there been more progress of late years than in the length of distance attained with wooden clubs. In iron play there is still much improvement to be desired, on th...
-Driving. Part 2
1. That the hands should be held as near together as possible. 2. That the knuckles of the left hand should be turned perceptibly upward, though not to an extent that will cramp the player. 3. That ...
-Driving. Part 3
MEDIUM STANCE FOR DRIVE. Mrs. Ross [To face. p. 277. We now come to the question of stance. There are three main stances, the open, the square, and the one wherein the right foot is withdrawn beh...
-Chapter II. Iron Play
The second essential club for a beginner to possess is an iron. The word iron embraces a multitude of clubs of all shapes and sizes, but the particular iron that we are now about to speak of is a modi...
-Iron Play. Continued
MISS STELLA TEMPLE Runner-up Open Ladies' Championship, 1912. [To face p. 287. Mrs. Cuthell and the Misses Whigham used to be remarkably good iron players. Of the leading lights of to-day Miss Dor...
-Chapter III. Putting
We have come to the consideration of the third essential club for a beginner, namely, the putter. Reams upon reams have been written about putting: it is wellnigh impossible to say anything new on the...
-Putting #2. Part 2
Before we come to the actual hitting of the ball in putting, it may be as well to say a few words as to the taking of the line. The success of a putt depends very much upon whether the line has been s...
-Putting #2. Part 3
Having adjusted grip and stance on sound lines, the player is now ready for the actual hitting of the ball. At this point the use of the wrists becomes a very important feature. Nearly all good putter...
-Chapter IV. Through The Green
Although out of a doubtful or bad lie the swing with a brassey varies slightly from that used with a driver, there is practically no difference between a driver and a brassey shot when the ball is lyi...
-Through The Green. Continued
When a ball is lying in a cupped lie, it is better to hit it with the heel of the club and to swing more uprightly. Turf should be taken, and the shot is played with almost a little jerk, caused by ge...
-Chapter V. Approach Play
A mashie is either the joy or the bane of a golfer's existence. A good mashie player loves her club and uses it on every possible occasion, a bad mashie player is always in dread of committing some fe...
-Approach Play. Continued
When the ball is behind a bank, or when for any reason it is wanted to rise suddenly to a fair height and pull up abruptly on touching the ground, the cut stroke is the one for the player to use. This...
-Chapter VI. In Hazards
Most women are at a disadvantage, as compared with men, in bunker play owing to their lack of strength. I do not mean that all women are feeble creatures, but that the average woman in comparison with...
-In Hazards. Part 2
A modicum of common-sense will be of more assistance to a player in a bunker, provided that she has grasped the two great elementary facts that it is the sand behind the ball, and not the ball itself,...
-In Hazards. Part 3
On inland links trees, ditches, and hedges are the commonest hazards. Trees possess a horrible fascination for many golfers, and they are most disastrous obstacles to contend with, as if a ball catche...
-Chapter VII. Many Inventions
We have discussed the uses of the ordinary clubs - driver, brassey, spoon, cleek, iron, mashie, niblick, and putter - and the methods of play that should be adopted with them. We now turn to the consi...
-Many Inventions. Part 2
To screw round a stymie is slightly more difficult than a straightforward jump, because so much depends on the nature of the green. The slightest amount of favourable fall in the ground will make a gr...
-Many Inventions. Part 3
It is a mere commonplace to say that golf is largely a matter of temperament, as every one has long recognised the fact. It has been pointed out over and over again. The stolid unemotional player has ...
-Many Inventions. Part 4
Some people play in gloves, others do not. The latter maintain they can get a better grip of the club. So many people, however, do use gloves, that it is very evident quite a good enough grip can be o...
-Chapter VIII. The Little Things That Matter
Despite the disparaging remarks that appear from time to time about women's golf from the pens of men writers, mixed foursomes are universally popular. The foursome game is very different from the sin...
-The Badminton Library
GOLF By HORACE G. HUTCHINSON With Contributions by Lord Monoreiff, The late Sir Walter Simpson, Bart., The Right Hon. A. J. Balfour, M.P., Andrew Lang, H. S. C. Everard, and others. With 90 Illu...







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previous page: The Happy Golfer | by Henry Leach
  
page up: Golf Books
  
next page: Present-Day Golf | by George Duncan, Bernard Darwin