Lenapes

See Delawares.

Lencas

Lencas, a tribe of Indians occupying the high plateaus of Otoro and Intibucat, S. W. of the city of Comayagua, Honduras. They speak dialects of a language which seems to have been widely diffused through the central portions of Honduras, and which the Spaniards, following the designation of their Mexican auxiliaries, vaguely denominated Chontal, a word which signifies simply foreign or barbarous. At present the Lencas occupy the mountain towns of Opoteca, Guajiquero, Lau-teroque, Intibucat, Yamalauguira, etc, and number from 35,000 to 40,000. They are industrious, frugal, and thrifty, peaceable but brave, devotedly attached to their mountain homes, and altogether good citizens of the state.

Lennep

Lennep, a town of Prussia, in the province of the Rhine, on the river Lennep, 22 m. E. of Dusseldorf; pop. in 1871, 7,722. It has manufactories of cashmere, woollens, hats, furniture, iron ware, and powder.

Lennox

See Dumbartonshire.

Lennox #1

Lennox, a N. E. county of Ontario, Canada, bordering on the N. W. shore of Lake Ontario, just above its entrance into the St. Lawrence, and drained by the Napanee and other rivers; area, 314 sq. m.; pop. in 1871, 16,396, of whom 5,244 were of Irish, 4,649 of German, 4,349 of English, and 1,478 of Scotch origin or descent. Its S. and S. W. coast is indented by numerous inlets. The surface is diversified, and the soil, resting on beds of limestone, is very fertile. Indian corn, wheat, oats, rye, buckwheat, potatoes, and peas are the chief productions. It is traversed by the Grand Trunk railway. Capital, Napanee.

Lenox

Lenox, a town of Berkshire co., Massachusetts, on the Housatonic river and railroad, 110 m. W. of Boston and 125 m. N. by E. of New York; pop. in 1870, 1,965. The principal village is situated on the summit of a range of hills, and has a number of elegant residences. In beauty of natural scenery Lenox is not surpassed by any town in western Massachusetts, and has become a favorite summer resort. It abounds in marble of excellent quality, which has been employed in the construction of public buildings in Washington and elsewhere, and also in iron ore, and contains extensive iron works, manufactories of window and plate glass, seven public schools, including a high school, and an incorporated academy. Lenox was settled in 1750, and incorporated in 1767, receiving the family name of the duke of Richmond.

Lentulus

Lentulus, the name of a patrician family, long prominent in ancient Roman history. Publius Lentulus Sura, the chief associate of Catiline, was quaestor in 81 B. C, praetor in 75, consul in 71, and in the following year was ejected from the senate for his infamous life. Joining the conspiracy of Catiline, he became praetor again in 63, was left in command of the conspirators in the city when Catiline departed for Etruria, was detected and proved guilty by Cicero through the Allo-broges, and was strangled in the Capitolino prison, Dec, 5, 63 B.C.