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The New Golf | by P. A. Vaile



There are always many people who say that golf cannot be learned from a book. Neither can arithmetic, unless one assiduously practises the actual work. Yet no intelligent person would try to argue that the arithmetic book is superfluous. The fact is that the American has in the past played most games by imitating other people. It is a fine way to learn, but it is not always the quickest, and it certainly is not the most scientific or intellectual.

TitleThe New Golf
AuthorP. A. Vaile
PublisherE. P. Dutton & Company
Year1916
Copyright1916, E. P. Dutton & Company
AmazonThe New Golf

By P. A. Vaile, Author of "Modern Golf," "The Soul of Golf," etc.

Containing Forty Illustrations From Photographs

The New Golf 2
-Preface
There are always many people who say that golf cannot be learned from a book. Neither can arithmetic, unless one assiduously practises the actual work. Yet no intelligent person would try to argue tha...
-Chapter I. The Eight Way To Learn Golf
If one employs a professional to teach one golf the first thing he does is to hand one a driver. Then he tells one a good deal about the mystery and difficulty of golf and proceeds to try to teach one...
-Chapter II. Gripping And Soling The Club
There are quite a number of different grips that may be advantageously used for playing golf-by different people. I have very little doubt that of the grips commonly used that which is generally calle...
-Chaptee III. Prevalent Misconceptions About The Golf Stroke
There is so much misconception about the stroke in golf that it is expedient to dispose of as much of it as possible before dealing with the strokes in the usual course. It will be noticed that I say...
-"Slow Back."
Of all the parrot cries of the links Slow back is perhaps the most insistent and also one of the most unnecessary. When once one has got one's swing under control, to insist on one's going back slow...
-Swinging Back
A very misleading idea of the beginning of the golf stroke is generally given by books and instructors. The pupil is told to swing the club back. In the address the club is practically at the bottom o...
-"As You Go Up So You Come Down."
This is one of the most revered of golf's hoary old traditions, most of which are extremely unsound, as indeed is this. One has undoubtedly a great tendency to come back to the ball by the same route ...
-Distribution Of Weight
Practically all books and all professional golfers teach the distribution of weight in the golf swing incorrectly. This is a very broad and sweeping statement but it is a fact. The distribution of wei...
-Regulation Of Stroke During Impact
The player must forget everything that he has ever read or been told as to what he can do to the ball while it is on the club, that is, during adhesion. The club and the ball are in actual contact and...
-Importance Of The Follow-Through
The player, especially the beginner, must get rid of the idea of the importance of the follow-through in golf. A totally disproportionate place is given to this part of the stroke in the minds of most...
-Foot-Work
Good foot-work is important in golf, but a vast number of people have very little idea of what good foot-work means. Most of them think good foot-work means much foot-work. It would improve the game o...
-The Power Of The Left Hand And Arm
In attacking the idea that the left arm is the dominant factor in the stroke at golf one is assailing a tradition as old, almost, and as carefully nourished as golf itself. The bare idea of such heres...
-The Wrists
More trouble than enough is caused by players being told how to get their wrists into their drive. They are given a totally erroneous idea of the function of the wrists. This is another of the many fa...
-Chapter IV. Putting
Putting is the foundation of the game of golf. It is extremely simple and easy to learn. I could take an old lady, who could not by any possibility ever make even a fair golfer, and convert her into a...
-Putting. Part 2
I am of course speaking generally now. There are special puts that require certain treatment peculiar to themselves, one in fifty perhaps. For all general use there is one put, the king-put, the put t...
-Putting. Part 3
I have given the reformation of Braid and Var-don as a useful lesson in putting. These anecdotes should be enough to prevent anyone's trying to put with drag, or backspin, which was practically what t...
-Putting. Part 4
We must be patient, however, and see what James Braid has to say. On page 119 of How to Play Golf we read: It happens, unfortunately, that concerning one department of the game that will cause the go...
-Mother Nature's Plans For Your Style On The Green
Remember that the first thing in putting is not any question of your style, your individuality, or how you look while you are doing it. Cease to think of yourself at all; or, if you cannot avoid this ...
-Mother Nature's Plans For Your Style On The Green. Part 2
Let me pause here, ye despondent ones, to repeat the words who need fear nobody on any putting green. This, now, is going almost further than I do. Braid proceeds: I may suggest that I have proved...
-Mother Nature's Plans For Your Style On The Green. Part 3
If, however, the result of your stroke is not what it should have been, I have no objection to your holding an inquiry into it provided you do not go into it on the course and delay and annoy people w...
-Chapter V. The Mashie
We have now finished with the putter for the present. Naturally we look for the next stroke. It is the shortest stroke that we have to play with a mashie. That is a stymie near the hole. Quite freque...
-The Mashie. Continued
There is a marked peculiarity about this stroke which should have been enough to show any one that it was very different from the regulation stymie stroke. On account of the blow not being an arc the ...
-Comparison Of Putters
I have shortly referred to the merits of this particular stymie shot. I have I think dwelt sufficiently on its remarkably quick rise which is so often of the very essence of the contract, as the law...
-Chaptee VI. The Iron
The iron is used when the shot is beyond the range of the mashie. About eighty yards is all that one should, generally speaking, ask the mashie to do. Above that one should use the iron until somethin...
-Chaptee VII. The Cleek
There is not much difference in the swing for the cleek and that in the drive. The main difference is perhaps that it is more curtailed. The grip is also practically the same. In using this club, inde...
-Chapter VIII. Driving
The drive in golf as played by the most finished players, really is a somewhat complex stroke. Without in any way joining the ranks of those who seem to see something mysterious in everything associat...
-Stance And Address
Stance means in golf the way in which one stands in relation to the ball as one puts one's club down near the ball preparatory to hitting it. In addressing the ball one usually rests the club on th...
-The Waggle
If some journalist writing a book for a great golfer had made him say that Mother Nature had allotted to each golfer a special kind of waggle, and that herein lay the greatest display of individuality...
-The Left Foot
We have finished with the waggle and we are now back to the ball firmly and comfortably settled in the address. In the ordinary course I should now take you through the upward swing, but I have so muc...
-The Left Leg
The next portion of the body that we must consider is the left leg. Directly the left heel leaves the ground the left leg bends inwards at the knee in the direction of the ball. All books tell one tha...
-The Right Leg
While all this has been happening, the right leg has not moved except torsionally. Here, I am afraid, I must allow some other portions of the anatomy to intrude on my sectional analysis, but I shall o...
-The Weight At The Top Of The Swing
We have now to consider a position of the very greatest importance in the golf swing. Certainly our player has arrived at it without arms or hands or a club. This in the ordinary way would no doubt be...
-The Weight At The Top Of The Swing. Continued
There is no possible doubt of the rooted nature of this false idea. The greatest writers and players emphasize it over and over again. James Braid is particularly emphatic about it. In How to Play Gol...
-The Arms In The Upward Swing
There is no mystery about what the arms and wrists do in the upward swing. I have spoken of the press forward. This is not an essential, but I do believe that it is useful. The hands are advanced so t...
-The Downward Swing
I purposely brought my readers up to the top of the swing by sections. Going down I may not retain that plan in its entirety. It is not so necessary. I am of opinion that arriving at the correct posit...
-The Right Leg And Hip-Action
So far the right leg has not had much attention. We left it at the top of the swing, firmly planted on the right foot, which had not moved in the upward swing, and full of that torsional strain, which...
-The Impact
This is the momentous part of the stroke. What happens during the fraction of an inch that the club and ball travel together in adhesion means as much to the golf ball as the direction of the barrel a...
-The Head
I have not had much to say about the head. The fact is that there is not much to say about the head that cannot better be said when dealing with the function of the eyes. The paramount duty of the hea...
-Summing Up
I have given all the main features of the drive in sections, and in a way not hitherto done. It must be learned thoroughly in sections unless one is lucky enough to be able to get it thoroughly from s...
-Chapter IX. The Niblick
A famous Frenchman was once talking to me about golf. He is a great swordsman and occupies an important position in one of the greatest firms in France. The nature of his work brings him constantly fa...
-Chapter X. The Master Stroke
When Harry Vardon published The Complete Golfer, he said that in bis opinion the master stroke of the game was: . . . the ball struck by any club to which a big pull or slice is intentionally applied...
-The Master Stroke. Part 2
I may explain in the first place how Vardon plays the shot in so far as regards those portions of it that are not the subject of controversy. According to one of his regular chroniclers he uses a clee...
-The Master Stroke. Part 3
I do not think that it is necessary for me to add anything to my explanation of the push shot. I have referred to Vardon's explanation of it in How to Play Golf. I speak now from memory, but there was...
-Chapter XI. The Slice
The slice is a very useful shot when one can control it. Unfortunately very few players can control it, although a vast number can produce it - when they do not want to do so. Vardon is a great belie...
-It-And Desire It Not-To Shed It
The slice primarily is a cut stroke. It is caused by the club engaging the ball as it crosses the intended line of flight to the hole. In driving for an intentional slice the stance is much more open...
-It-And Desire It Not-To Shed It. Continued
The real demand of golf is for extreme mechanical accuracy. There are many reasons for this. The striking face of the golf club is the smallest surface used for such a purpose in any field sport, the ...
-Chapter XII. The Pull
The pull is looked upon by golfers in an entirely different light from that in which they regard its humble relative the slice. There is hardly the player traveling the links to-day who does not feel ...
-The Pull. Part 2
He would thus discover when he had plenty of room for a straight drive; and he could verify his conclusions by driving another straight ball or two. This done, he was to count the number of matches or...
-The Pull. Part 3
Both in the drive with top-spin in tennis and in the pull in golf the turnover of the right wrist has nothing whatever to do with the production of the stroke. That comes in the follow-through, after ...
-Chapter XIII. The Eyes
There is some advice that is given to every golfer or player about his eyes and the ball. Every book loudly insists on it, and if anything goes wrong with any part of the swing any one who can think o...
-Chapter XIV. The Short Swing
Why is it that they like to swing so much and waste so much power, unmindful of the fact that the shorter the swing the greater the accuracy? This is a question that is well worth while pondering. ...
-Chapter XV. The Power Of The Left
The hoariest old tradition that ever fastened on to golf was the power of the left. It was more than a tradition. It was a fetich. Authors and journalists worshiped at its shrine. Golfers and would-be...
-The Power Of The Left. Continued
Brown Bros., N. Y. FRANCIS OUIMET Top of Swing in the Drive for the obvious reason that one is practically sure to go into the tightening up process at an inconvenient moment. If I were not...
-The Left Hand's Lament
(Picked up on the links at St. Andrews) Since first by Heaven's august decree The Royal Ancient game was planned I always was allowed to be The Master Hand. To me did textbooks all allot The part of...
-Chapter XVI. The Golf Club
Golf is so well played nowadays that it is scarcely exaggeration to call it an exact science. Certainly those who excel at it require to play it with almost mathematical precision. For this reason, if...
-Form And Make Of Golf Clubs
The United States Golf Association will not sanction any substantial departure from the traditional and accepted form and make of golf clubs, which, in its opinion, consists of a plain head shaft and ...
-Chapter XVII. The Golf Ball
I do not intend to inflict on my readers a history of the evolution of the golf ball. There is really comparatively little to tell that is not generally known of the outstanding characteristics of the...
-The Golf Ball. Part 2
The old round bullet was not remarkable for the length of its carry nor for its direction until we gave it a tail, by providing it with extra length and putting a hole in one end wherein we inserted a...
-The Golf Ball. Part 3
It certainly was not too much like it. It was the same marking. There never was a better marking for a golf ball and I doubt if there ever will be. I was the first to put it on the rubber-cored ball, ...
-The Golf Ball. Part 4
It is easy to test the rubber-cored balls as regards their center of gravity. Sir Ralph did this by placing the ball he desired to test in a basin of water until it came to rest, when he marked the ce...
-The Golf Ball. Part 5
This surely is a sufficient vindication of the soundness of my claim for less marking. Sir Ralph, moreover, says that on his return home he shot this ball from his small catapult and that it then sev...
-Chapter XVIII. The Flight Op The Golf Ball
The flight of the golf ball has occupied the attention of some very eminent men. Golf was not so popular in Newton's time as it is now. If it had been we should no doubt have had the benefit of his kn...
-The Flight Op The Golf Ball. Part 2
This is one of the most remarkable instances in the history of science of the investigator finding the thing he was looking for instead of starting out to ascertain the truth. In fact, he went so far ...
-The Flight Op The Golf Ball. Part 3
The truth is that Professor Thomson's explanation tends at the outset to confuse. The swerve of the ball has nothing whatever to do with the turning of the nose, or the millions of noses in any part...
-The Flight Op The Golf Ball. Part 4
It is strange that although Newton thoroughly understood the theory of swerve he was in the same error as that of Professors Tait and Thomson, namely that it was the oblique racket, in other words t...
-The Flight Op The Golf Ball. Part 5
Loft is not necessary for backspin. One could drive a ball with a club having a vertical face and obtain much backspin and a good carry, provided the tee were high enough to allow the cut down across ...
-Afterword
And now, those who have followed me so far, will see that The New Golf is not so much new golf as it is old golf newly interpreted. It is in effect, golf as it has been played since golf was golf...







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previous page: The Art Of Golf | by Bart W. G. Simpson
  
page up: Golf Books
  
next page: Hints To Golfers | by O. K. Niblick