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The Art Of Golf | by Bart W. G. Simpson



There is little doubt that many fair players have a scheme of approaching, in which topping and other kinds of missing off the wrist are depended on to supply the amount of drag requisite at the distance. Such a scheme is to be suspected, if occasionally an approach lofts as far past as it was short. This it does when the ball is hit clean, which is very rarely, because it is very difficult to do, and doubly difficult by reason of another fiction, viz., that over-clubbing is wise, and hard hitting a fault. How can the victim even learn to hit cleanly? By practice! What folly! Most players will recognise that they sometimes get into a way of foundering putts, which is difficult to get out of, because cleanly-putted balls go too far...

TitleThe Art Of Golf
AuthorBart W. G. Simpson
PublisherDavid Douglas
Year1892
Copyright1892, David Douglas
AmazonThe Art of Golf
The Art Of Golf 1

Second Edition, Revised

To The Honourable Company Of Edinburgh Golfers This Book Is Dedica Ted Humbly As A Golfer Proudly As Their Captain Gratefully For Merry Meetings And Cordially Without Permission By The Author.

Pleasures are more beneficial than duties, because, like the quality of mercy, they are not strained, and they are twice blest.'

R. L. S.

-Preface To The Second Edition
It is so long since the first edition was ex-hausted, that I may be suspected of having modestly supposed that there was nothing about the book which could be wanted, or thought desirable enough to ca...
-Preface To The First Edition
A Preface would be superfluous were it not necessary to say a word or two about the Illustrations. My aim was to show (for the first time, I believe), by means of instantaneous photography, the moveme...
-Part I. Preliminary, And Principally FoolishPart I. Preliminary, And Principally Foolish. Chapter I. The Praise Of Golf
There are so many good points about the royal and ancient game of golf that its comparative obscurity, rather than its increasing popularity, is matter for wonder. It is apparently yet unknown to the ...
-Chapter II. The Origin Of Golf
Golf, besides being a royal game, is also a very ancient one. Although it cannot be determined when it was first played, there seems little doubt that it had its origin in the present geological perio...
-Chapter III. The Nature Of The Game
Golf belongs to that large class of human games in which a ball plays the principal part. Balls of all sorts and sizes amuse men - hard ones, soft ones, large ones, small ones. These are treated in a ...
-Chapter IV. Of Sets Of Clubs And Other Golfing Appurtenances
A set of clubs may be defined as that assortment which the player's caddy carries in a cover on wet days. On fine days the player carries one club himself, either that which he has just used or the on...
-Chapter V. Of Caddies
Caddies are persons employed to carry golfers' clubs. Some people call them 'caudies,' others try to do without them; but experience teaches that a bad one is better than none. On the older greens, w...
-Part II. Of Playing The Game. Chapter I. Of Driving In General
It is a common complaint that, with so many things to be thought of at golf, accuracy is almost impossible. This is not the way to state the case. It should rather stand: If points of style are though...
-Part II. Of Playing The Game. Chapter I. Of Driving In General. Continued
Fig. i. It may seem that if the advice, instead of being, as it always is, 'Stand more behind,' were 'Change the position of one of your feet,' o the result would not be to produce the style of Fig...
-Chapter II. Of Style IX Driving
For the purpose of analysis the swing of the golfer may be divided into three parts: 1st. Position; 2d, Address; 3d, Swing proper. Position. - Some treatises on the game tell us in feet and inches t...
-Of Style IX Driving. Part 2
Address. - After taking their stance, most players are in the habit of making some preliminary motions with their club before proceeding to drive. In some cases these flourishes are slight, in others ...
-Of Style IX Driving. Part 3
FIG. 6. - Proper Grip, hands 'over' or 'above. during the swing?' is the real question, which the address ought to solve thus: - Having placed himself opposite the ball, let the player take hold of h...
-Of Style IX Driving. Part 4
The left elbow-joint, as a joint, has no part in a true swing. But it is a prevalent habit to close it a little after the club has circled back as far as it naturally should. This is not quite so sill...
-Of Style IX Driving. Part 5
Hitherto I have spoken chiefly of errors in swinging developed in the region between the shoulders and the point of the club. Those that can be made with the rest of the body are of a simpler nature, ...
-Chapter III. Advice To Beginners
The beginner who has read the foregoing chapters will be apt to re-read the first sentence, and to agree with those who complain that accuracy is almost impossible with so many things to remember; or,...
-Advice To Beginners. Continued
In the laudable endeavour to drive far (and no man should ever accept the position of a weak player), the beginner has to stumble through many errors before mastering the secret of where and how to ap...
-Chapter IV. Of Peculiarities And Faults
There is a general - I might say universal - tendency among golfers to exaggerate the importance of style. From the best to the worst, when off their driving, they begin at once to alter something, as...
-Of Peculiarities And Faults. Part 2
Some day we may have a great player who has fallen into the habit of cancelling his stoop by placing his right foot near the ball, his left back (why not?), and then there will be a revolution among t...
-Of Peculiarities And Faults. Part 3
If we consider the plausible and insidious means by which these tricks insinuate themselves into a golfer's affections, it is not so much to be wondered at that he is conquered. By their aid he finds ...
-Of Peculiarities And Faults. Part 4
High driving is the result of too upright a swing. I do not mean that the onlooker sees the club go over the player's head, or anything of that sort; but he may detect that the club reaches, and also ...
-Chapter V. Of Temporary Faults
A man's golf, like the rest of him, is subject to many temporary ailments. By simply living as usual, his body will recover; by golfing, his golf will. For colds, golf, and biliousness, the less docto...
-Of Temporary Faults. Part 2
Sensible golfers, either of experience, or who have devoutly accepted my previous remarks upon caddies' advice, know the folly of forcing themselves to do, or not to do, these things when told they ar...
-Of Temporary Faults. Part 3
This is sure to be true; but he still fails. During his spell of good play all the elements of driving, such as sweeping the ball away, placing the club behind it, etc., became second nature. During h...
-Chapter VI. Of Playing Through The Green
After an accurate tee shot, the second has usually (a grumbler would say, sometimes) to be played from a light lie on soft sward, and is but a repetition of the first. Some people, however, maintain t...
-Chapter VII. Of Bunker Play
Before leaving that part of the game in which sending the ball as far as possible is desirable, it is necessary to consider for a moment a very painful subject - Bunker Play. The mere appearance of a...
-Chapter VIII. Of Approaching
When the player's ball is within less than a driver shot of the hole, approaching commences, and new qualities - the sense of weight, how to weigh it, appreciation of distance, etc., - are called into...
-Of Approaching. Part 2
Without wishing to direct attention too emphatically to one point, it is nevertheless true that the left wrist joint has no part to play in good approaching, and must be rigidly restrained from taking...
-Of Approaching. Part 3
Plate XII. SIXTY YARDS FROM THE HOLE ( 1 ). Plate XIII. SIXTY YARDS FROM THE HOLE ( 2). It may seem unnecessary to insist so much upon anything so self-evident as the necessity of adhering to ...
-Of Approaching. Part 4
A style of approach often employed is running the ball with the iron, either along the ground, or very little above it. When this is attempted, it is customary to turn in the club face. By so doing, t...
-Chapter IX. Of Putting
To the beginner putting seems the least interesting part of the game. It feels mean to go dribbling and creeping up to a little hole, whilst a teeing-ground, from which you may drive the ball unknown ...
-Of Putting. Continued
Many players acquire faith enough to play for the back of the hole by using a cleek or an iron for short putts, and they then maintain that these clubs have the quality of keeping the ball true to its...
-Chapter X. Of Match And Medal Play
Having examined in detail the different kinds of shots which the golfer is called upon to make, a few remarks on combining them into a game may fittingly conclude this little treatise. There is no su...
-Of Match And Medal Play. Part 2
This contempt must, however, be largely seasoned with respect. It does not do lightly to lose the first two holes, or any hole. When one is down it is natural to hunger for holes, but even with five u...
-Of Match And Medal Play. Part 3
Flattery is still more dangerous than grumbling. Under its influence a level match for shillings maybe followed by a round for pounds, giving odds. Out of the hundred shots more or less you have made ...
-Books
HENRY VIII. I. I. - (Shakespeare on Golf.) EDINBURGH UNIVERSITY PRESS: T. & A. CONSTABLE Printers to Her Majesty. E. L. ANDERSON'S BOOK ON HORSEMANSHIP Lately Published. Fourth Edition. 8vo. 21s. ...







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