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Entrees | by S. Beaty-Pownall



Little, if any, originality is claimed for the following recipes, most of which have appeared in the Cookery columns of the Queen during the last eight or nine years, from whence they have been collected at the request of many readers of the Queen, to save reference to back numbers not always within reach. Additional recipes have, however, been given, to bring this little work as much up to date as possible; but all these, like the previous ones, have been carefully tested, and are all (as I know from practical experience) well within the capacity of any ordinary "good plain cook," gifted with fair intelligence and a little good will. I desire also to take this opportunity of acknowledging my indebtedness to the various authors of standard foreign cookery books, and also to offer my grateful thanks to Mrs. A. B. Marshall, and several other well-known chefs, whose kindness has so materially helped and rendered possible my work in these last years.

TitleEntrees
AuthorS. Beaty-Pownall
PublisherHorace Cox
Year1901
Copyright1901, Horace Cox
AmazonEntrées

The "Queen" Cookery Books: No. 4.

Collected And Described By S. Beaty-Pownall, Departmental Editor "Housewife and Cuisine," Queen Newspaper, and Author of "A Book of Sauces."

Second Edition.

-Chapter I. Entrees And Rechauffes
Originally entrees were often, and indeed at first almost always, called hors d'oeuvre, or, as one might paraphrase it, by the way dishes; not included in the actual menu, but simply trifles brought...
-Entrees And Rechauffes. Part 2
The stock added to this should have had a slice of ham or smoked lean bacon, some green onions, a little sherry, and a good bouquet boiled with it to flavour or perfume it, and the whole is boiled t...
-Entrees And Rechauffes. Part 3
Before concluding this chapter a few words or so must be said regarding garnishes. It cannot be denied that of late these have been fearfully overdone, with the result that in many cases it is absolut...
-Chapter II. Cutlets, Fillets, Etc
Few better tests of a cook's capacity exists than the appearance of her cutlets. To start with she must study the meat from which she cuts them. Small well-fed mutton should always be chosen for this ...
-Cutlets, Fillets, Etc. Part 2
When ready to serve, the cutlets will be a dainty brown, with darker stripes showing the mark of the grid bars, and when cut they will be a nice pinky-red inside and full of juice. To saute them, have...
-Cutlets, Fillets, Etc. Part 3
Usually a little savoury butter is spread on the dish, the fillets laid on this, and then a tiny ball of the same butter is placed on each fillet as it is to be served, after it has been garnished wit...
-Cutlets, Fillets, Etc. Part 4
Veal can be filleted like both beef or mutton, i.e. you can have cutlets of veal cut from the best end of the neck exactly as with mutton, and excellent these are! Or, again, you can use the filet or ...
-Cutlets, Fillets, Etc. Part 5
For venison you use what is called a cooked marinade, prepared thus: fry together for five minutes four ounces of sliced carrot, double that of sliced onion, a good spoonful of minced mixed herbs, and...
-Cutlets, Fillets, Etc. Part 6
If preferred instead of broiling them the cutlets may be sautes, i.e., placed when trimmed in a well buttered saute-pan, sprinkled with a little wine and glaze, covered with a buttered paper, and cook...
-Fillets Of Beef
Fillets of beef, however served, can be dressed by many of the recipes given for cutlets, savoury butters of all kinds being especially suitable and appetising. As a general rule it may be broadly sta...
-Fillets Of Beef. Part 2
Filets De Boeuf A La Chasseur Sautez the fillets (or use grenadins or fillets as you please, varying the name accordingly) which should have been larded and marinaded in the venison marinade for a...
-Fillets Of Beef. Part 3
Fillet A La Viennoise Take ¾lb. of good well trimmed fillet steak, and mince it finely, seasoning it as you do so with salt, paprica (or coralline pepper answers capitally), and very finely minced ...
-Supreme De Volaille
For this the two sides of the breast of the fowl are lifted off in a piece and split in half (instead of being thinly sliced down), each being then cut in two, these fillets being placed in a well but...
-Cotelettes De Pigeon A La D'Uxelles
Prepare the pigeons as described in chapter 2, boning them and leaving just enough of the leg to form the bone of the cutlet; bat and trim this neatly into shape, then cover or mask each pretty thic...
-Filets De Sanglier A La Frederic Le Grand
Trim a fillet of wild boar neatly, and place it in a pan lined with sliced bacon, a slice of lean ham, two carrots, two onions stuck with cloves, two bayleaves, a good bouquet, salt, pepper, peppercor...
-Rabbit Fillets
Rabbit Fillets A La Friande Prepare the fillets of a rabbit as described before, and toss them in a little butter till firm; then strain off the butter and leave the fillets till cold, when they mu...
-Fillets Of Calves' Liver. Foie De Veau
Finally there are the fillets of calves' liver, so frequently seen and appreciated abroad. Foie De Veau A L'Italienne Cut a nice calves' liver into thickish slices as for liver and bacon, and pl...
-Chapter IV. Souffles, Mousses, Etc
Few dishes betray inexperience more than a souffle, which is held by the average cook as the ne plus ultra of high class cookery, and the cordon bleu capable of turning out what she is pretty certai...
-Souffles, Mousses, Etc. Continued
In this latter case the best plan is, about ten minutes after the mould has been set in the bain-marie or pan, to lift the lid of the latter very slowly and gently, and inspect it carefully. If it is ...
-Souffles, Mousses, Etc. Part 2
Boudins A La Czarina Take about half a pound of chicken farce, as prepared for chicken creams, and fill with it a small baking in about 8in. by 12in., lay over this a sheet of buttered paper and po...
-Souffles, Mousses, Etc. Part 3
Creme Francillon Have ready about a pound of chicken farce prepared as for creams; well butter some pretty little plain moulds (egg moulds are perhaps the prettiest) and garnish them to taste with ...
-Souffles, Mousses, Etc. Part 4
Crepinettes A La D'Estine Take a pound of partridge quenelle farce and add to it about 6oz. of par-boiled fat bacon and 4oz. of truffles, both cut into small dice (or use tiny cubes of pate de foie...
-Souffles, Mousses, Etc. Part 5
Souffle Of Pheasant Cut all the flesh from the breast of a raw pheasant, mince, pound, and sieve it, then mix the puree with half a pint of very stiffly whipped cream, seasoning it to taste...
-Bread Entrees
Pains These delicate entrees are best moulded either in plain charlotte moulds or in border moulds, the latter especially taking less time to poach (a great consideration, on account of their delic...
-Quenelles
Quenelles Of Grouse A La Windsor Take the flesh from two good grouse or blackcock, and make with them a delicate quenelle mixture; meanwhile, prepare a strong game stock with the carcases, covered ...
-Chapter V. Timbales, Vol-Au-Vent, Patties, Etc
Like souffles, mousses, etc., the entrees treated of in this chapter have been pretty generally relegated to the haute cuisine, and as such considered entirely outside the sphere of the ordinary cook....
-Timbales, Vol-Au-Vent, Patties, Etc. Part 2
Croustade A La Champenoise Prepare a bread croustade as described above, and keep it hot. Meantime prepare a ragout as follows; Three-parts cook a good slice of ham, then take it up and cut it into...
-Vol-Au-Vent Financiere
Prepare the pastry case as described above, then have ready a ragout of tiny quenelles made of any raw. white meat, any remains of cooked brains or sweetbread, cut up small, little fillets of cooked c...
-Timbales
Timbale Milanaise Line a mould with the short crust as described above, and have ready some just boiled macaroni, enough to about quarter fill the pie; now put it back into a pan with some good mea...
-Timbales. Part 2
Timbale De Macaroni A La Romaine Line a well buttered mould which has been rather thickly sprinkled with vermicelli, with good lard paste, pressing this well home into the shape of the mould; have ...
-Petites Timbales De Macaroni Aux Huitres
Well butter some small plain moulds, placing at the bottom a round of either cooked tongue (see that this is a good colour) or truffle, stamped out with a plain round cutter; then line the mould neatl...
-Chapter VI. Unclassed Entrees
However systematically one may try to class entrees, there are always some that appear to escape one, and it is for this reason I include in this chapter a variety of odds and ends that I should be so...
-Unclassed Entrees. Part 2
Beignets De Foie Gras Make a good batter with two heaped tablespoonfuls of dried and sifted flour, the yolk of one egg, a tablespoonful of oil (or 1 oz. of liquefied butter), with coralline pepper ...
-Unclassed Entrees. Part 3
Caneton A L'Indecis Three parts roast a fine young wild duck (or an ordinary duck), then cut it into joints, and lay it in a stewpan with salt, pepper, two tablespoonfuls of best olive oil, half a ...
-Unclassed Entrees. Part 4
Langue A L'Italienne Slice a tongue cooked as before, have ready a veil-buttered fireproof dish sprinkled with grated cheese, lay on this a layer of peeled and thinly sliced tomatoes, then more che...
-How To Cook Ox Palates
Blanch three or four ox palates for ten minutes in boiling salted water, then drain, and when cool, scrape off all the white skin, trim them neatly, and place them in a pan with a quart of stock, a go...
-How To Prepare Oxtails
Oxtails, and equally, of course, calf's tails, may be made into very nice dishes, thus: Cut the tail into neat pieces and soak it for two hours, then blanch it in boiling water for fifteen minutes; ri...
-Beef Olives
For these cut slices of beef ¼in. thick by l½in. to 2in. wide, and from Sin. to 3½in. long; spread each of these neatly on one side with a nice veal stuffing, to which you have added either a boned an...
-Bis De Veau A La Financiere
Well wash, blanch, and rinse a couple of good sweetbreads, then place them between two plates and press them till perfectly cold, when they are larded neatly, trimming the lardoons nicely. Wrap the sw...
-Breast Of Mutton A La Marseillaise
Braise the whole of a breast of mutton with vegetables, etc., in the usual way, with a good bouquet, some cloves and peppercorns, and half a bottle of light French white wine. (The pan should properly...
-Larks A La Taverney
Singe and empty twenty-four larks, removing the necks and the claws; eight or ten minutes before they are wanted melt 3oz. or 4oz. of fat bacon finely minced, in a saute-pan; lay in the larks, and tos...
-Mauviettes
Mauviettes A La Favre Bone the larks, put a large oyster into each bird, truss the latter into shape for roasting, skewering a slitted slice of fat bacon over each little breast, and place each bir...
-Chapter VII. Rechauffes
Many hints with regard to rechauffes were given in the first chapter, but it may be as well to risk repetition in the attempt to enforce on the British cook the fact that a rechauffe is not a twice-co...
-Rechauffes. Part 2
Now put into a pan a nice piece of butter, according to the amount of meat you have, and, as soon as this melts, lay in a finely chopped shallot or a small onion, and let it brown delicately, keeping ...
-Rechauffes. Part 3
Jewish cooks often use pure cotton seed oil, which is much cheaper than good olive oil, but this, unless very refined, has a distinctly objectionable smell when cooking, which renders its use in parti...
-Rechauffes. Part 4
It is the sauce and the parsley that transforms the ordinary fritter into an orlie, but brown meat cannot properly be treated thus, though it often is, and if not absolutely correct makes a particular...
-Rechauffes. Part 5
Attelets, Or Atteraux (As They Are Sometimes Called) Of Veal And Ham Cut some nice cooked veal and some ham into neat squares about 1½in. square and ¼in. thick, and thread these on tiny wooden, ste...
-Rechauffes. Part 6
Cannelons Mince down 2lb. of underdone roast beef freed from skin, sinew, etc., and mix it with a pound of cooked and minced, or pounded ham, half the rind of a lemon grated, and some parsle...
-Rechauffes. Part 7
Fricassee A La Villeroi Slice down some cold cooked chicken and some tongue neatly, and lay these alternately in a well buttered dish sprinkled with salt, pepper, and finely grated Parmesan cheese,...
-Chicken Dishes
Poulet A La Chipolata Peel and stew some nice chestnuts till tender but not broken, slice down some cooked carrots and some small silver onions previously blanched, having about twelve or eighteen ...
-Tomates A La Reyniere
Split the tomatoes at the side, and with a teaspoon remove the seeds and the pulp. Mince the latter with fine herbs (parsley, chives, etc.), a suspicion of shallot, and any fine mincemeat at hand (suc...
-Cutlets
Cutlets In Cases Prepare a farce by mixing together half a teacupful of finely grated breadcrumbs, a large tablespoonful of very finely minced fat bacon a chopped shalot, a little minced parsley, s...
-Miroton
Miroton De Boeuf Cut an onion into thin slices and fry this in plenty of butter or clarified beef dripping till it begins to colour, then dust in a little flour, add a wineglassful of white wine, h...
-Chapter IX. Chaufroix, And Other Cold Dishes
During the last few years, in which the general Culinary taste has been more and more cultivated, and in consequence a more delicate style of cookery has become popular, cold dishes have grown in gene...
-Chaufroix, And Other Cold Dishes. Part 2
As a matter of fact the strong taste of vinegar, flavoured or plain, which is such a marked characteristic of aspic jelly, is absolutely destructive of the delicacy of any sauce of which acidit...
-Chaufroix, And Other Cold Dishes. Part 3
The recipes given in the next chapter will serve to show how these various addenda may be utilised, and an intelligent cook will very soon learn to vary her entrees almost indefinitely. Lastly come...
-Chaufroix, And Other Cold Dishes. Part 4
Petites Causes A La Whitstdble, Or Aux Marennes Have ready some nice crisp patty cases, and place in each a spoonful of white mayonnaise, then some cold cooked sweetbread cut into dice, and a beard...
-Aspic Dishes
Aspic En Belle Vue For this decorate some small timbale moulds in this way: Slice down a hard-boiled egg one-eighth of an inch thick, and with a plain round cutter, about the size of a threepenny p...
-Cailles En Delice
Bone the quails and with a forcing bag and plain pipe farce them with sieved foie gras, then tie them into shape again with a band of buttered paper, place a slice of slitted bacon over the breast of ...
-Escalopes De Cailles En Chaufroix
For this prepare a farce by first mincing and then pounding till smooth ½lb. of any raw white meat such as chicken, rabbit, or veal, and 2oz. of cooked tongue, moistening this as you pound it with a g...
-Caneton En Mayonnaise
For this the ducklings should properly have been roasted the previous day, and left to get cold uncut, this, however, is a counsel of perfection. Cut the cold bird up into neat joints and marinade the...
-Cold Dishes. Chaufroix
Chaufroix De Cailles A La Castilienne For this the birds are boned, stuffed with forced meat, and cooked as before; they are then either sliced or halved, with a hot wet knife, as you prefer, maske...
-Cold Dishes. Chaufroix. Continued
Chaufroix De Lapereau A L'Indienne For this a cooked rabbit, or more as required, is cut up into neat joints, and these are then coated with a delicate Indienne (a white curry sauce), and served on...
-Chaufroix De Volaille
This may vary from the cold roast fowl cut up into neat joints and masked with mayonnaise of various kinds, or with more or less rich white sauce, to the delicate supreme de volatile en chaufroix, whe...
-Cotelettes A La Connaught
For these braise a nice neck of lamb carefully, with vegetables, Ac., and when pressed and cold, cut out the cutlets and trim them neatly, masking them pretty thickly with mint aspic (i.e., three tabl...
-Epigrammes De Mouton En Chaufroix
Remove the skin, bones, gristle, and superfluous fat from a nice breast of mutton and flatten it out; then spread it first with a delicate sausage meat farce, and then with a layer of the following fa...
-Creme De Lapereau Aux Tornates
Pulp a pound of cooked tomatoes through a sieve and mix this puree with three tablespoonfuls of just liquid aspic; line twelve cutlet moulds with this, then fill them with a mixture as follows: take s...
-Filets De Lievre Glaces Aux Cerises
Prepare a puree of hare by mincing and then pounding the fillets of a nice roast hare, moistening them as you do so with two good tablespoonfuls each of Richelieu sauce (Espagnole sauce made from the ...
-Tomates A L'Algerienne
For these, properly speaking, yon require tomato moulds, but, really, any pretty little shapes will do. Line whichever mould you choose with well-coloured tomato aspic, and fill with the following min...
-Turban De Foie Gras A La D'Uxelles
Prepare a d'Uxelles mixture thus: Into a delicately clean pan put ½lb. of well washed and minced fresh mushrooms with an ounce of butter, salt and pepper, a teaspoon-ful of freshly minced parsley, and...
-Chapter XI. Sauces
The question of sauces is always a puzzle, both to the average cook and to her mistress, and it cannot unfortunately be asserted that either can answer it satisfactorily. Even plain melted butter, sim...
-Sauces. Part 2
Bechamel on the contrary requires the addition of milk, the butter and flour being prepared as before, and diluted with half colourless stock, half new milk, its excellence when served alone depending...
-Sauces. Part 3
The difference between this and poulette is its superior delicacy and the snowy white tint which differentiates it from the more substantial and cream coloured poulette. Sauce a la creme is another...
-Sauces. Part 4
Sauce Aux Champignons Boil 4oz. or so of nicely wiped and broken up mushrooms in half a pint of good brown sauce for a few minutes; stirring it well, and serve as it is, plain or sieved, seasoning ...
-Sauces. Part 5
Sauce Poivrade This is a sauce frequently used as a foundation for others, and in this case is made by frying together, till lightly coloured, two shallots with 4oz. minced lean ham, a bay leaf, an...
-Sauces. Part 6
Sauce Bigarade Peel thinly a Seville or bitter orange (bigarade), shred it into julienne strips, and blanch it for three or four minutes in boiling water; stir together half a pint of good espagnol...
-Sauces. Part 7
Sauce Italienne (Brume) Boil down a gill of any light white wine (French for choice) to half, then stir it into half a pint of rich reduced espagnole, with half an ounce of glaze, and a good spoonf...
-Sauces. Part 8
Sauce Robert Cut two medium sized onions into dice, and fry in butter till of a golden brown, then drain off the butter, and cook them in a little stock with a tiny pinch of sugar, till melted; mea...
-Sauces. Part 9
Mousseline Sauce Stir together a gill of aspic whipped till stiff and frothy, a gill of mayonnaise sauce, and a gill of stiffly whipped cream, with a dust of coralline pepper and of caster sugar, a...
-Sauce Bretonne
This, again, is also sometimes mixed with well-made tomato puree in the proportion of two parts onion to one part tomato, and is an excellent accompaniment to either beef or mutton. Of Sauce Suprem...
-Sauce Francaise
To the quantity of Bearnaise sauce given above add half a gill of good tomato puree, with an ounce of very strong chicken stock; add a small teaspoonful of finely minced parsley and a teaspoonful of c...
-Mayonnaise
Crush in a bowl with a wooden spoon about a teaspoonful of mustard flour, half an average saltspoonful each of salt and white pepper, then work into it the yolk of a raw egg (see that a special wooden...
-Chapter XII. Odds And Ends
Caul, Or Crepine Pieces of pig's caul (called in French crepine, whence the name of crepinettes applied to small entrees wrapped and cooked in pieces of the caul), used for wrapping little balls of...
-Garnishes
This is a word roughly applied to any addenda served with a dish, and includes vegetables, sauce, etc. It is, however, more particularly applied to small ragouts, or mixtures of various kinds of meat,...
-Aspic Jelly
The nature of this savoury jelly depends a good deal on what it is to be used for. Formerly it was almost invariably made by boiling down calves feet with various addenda of spices, vegetables, etc., ...
-Bain-Marie
This utensil is a most useful one, and of almost universal use abroad, where few save chefs have kitchen maids; though in England it is looked on as a luxury only required in very large kitchens. This...
-Blanching Vegetables, Etc
This is very simply done by putting the object to be blanched, after cleaning and trimming it, into plenty of cold water with a pinch of salt, then bringing it to the boil, straining it off directly i...
-Batter
Of this there are several kinds. One has already been given; another is made by putting into a basin say 4oz. of fine sifted flour; make a hollow in this and drop into it the yolks of two fresh eggs, ...
-Borders
These are made of many things, but the principal ones are farce, rice, or potato for hot borders, and savoury cream, rice, or aspic for cold ones. The directions for farce borders have been given in t...
-Breadcrumbs (Savoury)
Any odds and ends of stale bread should be put into the oven (carefully sorting the crumb from the crust), and thoroughly dried, without, however, letting it colour; it is then crushed to a powder, si...
-Butters
Savoury butters are much used in foreign kitchens, either as garnish, or to put the finishing touches to any delicate sauce. Hot Butter: For this purpose rub up a teaspoonful of either cayenne, corall...
-Driessauces
These most valuable additions to one's store-cupboard are the invention of M. C. Driessens, a well-known French chef, who discovered the method of solidifying various white and brown sauces, so that t...
-How To Prepare Dripping
Pour the dripping, if hot, into a saucepanful of boiling water; (if cold, break it up in small pieces and put these in the boiling water;) let it boil up, and then boil for fifteen minutes, stirring i...
-D'Uxelles Mixture
This is prepared by frying together equal parts of mushrooms and parsley, a third of shallot or chives, and a little truffle (all minced separately), in fresh butter, seasoning it with salt, pepper, a...
-Farce, Or Stuffing
Farces are of various kinds: For instance, beef farce; pound 5oz. of panade, add to it 5oz. of minced and pounded beef, and pound the two well together, adding in 1 oz. of fresh butter, two or three r...
-Gelatine
When this is used, only the best quality should be chosen, as only in this way can the disagreeable gluey flavour, so noticeable in inferior gelatines, be avoided. All the recipes in this book have be...
-How To Boil Macaroni
The great thing to remember about this is that macaroni must be put on in plenty of boiling water and kept at the boil all the time it is cooking, adding sufficient salt with the macaroni. Directly th...
-Rice
Almost every cook has his or her own way of boiling this; the two following methods are given from long and successful use. The first is Indian. Pick over and well wash the rice, then put it into a pa...
-Sauces To Tammy
Tammy cloth is a loosely woven woollen material used for straining the sauce or liquid required. The word 1a said to be derived from the French tamis, a very fine sieve. There are two methods of tammy...
-How To Cook Truffles
Put a dozen fine fresh and well cleansed truffles in a pan with sufficient sherry or madeira to cover them, with a pinch each of salt and pepper, and cook them gently till tender; now stir in half an ...







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