Among the best of fruits to serve for breakfast and always welcome at dinner. TheCon-cord grape is the staple variety available in this country, and taking it altogether it is the best, for while there are others more delicate in flavor and more attractive in color, there are none so evenly ripe, so juicy, so sweet, so good to last through several months, so rcliable-and unfailing.

Muscadine

A Southern native grape of high musky flavor.

Scuppernong

A large, coarse Southern native grape, good for wine; comes to market without stems, like baskets of plums; is dull-yellow or olive-colored.

Malaga Grapes

Imported in kegs, packed in sawdust; cost about twice as much as native grapes; firm, green, sweet; the kind to buy for party suppers and for dessert in winter and spring.

Grape Ice Cream

White California grapes, Muscats, Tokays,' are suitable to mix in ice cream whole, uncooked, after the frezing is nearly completed.

Grape Water Ice

Any kind of grapes pressed and the juice strained, sweetened, frozen.

Grape Jelly

Stewed grapes, the juice strained off and boiled down thick with sugar.

Grape Table Jeely

White grape juice strained, sweetened, wine added, and 1 1/2 oz. gelatine in each quart, boiled; cooled in moulds with layers of raw grapes. Grape Pies, tarts, jams, marmalade, preserves, etc., same as other fruit.

Pickled Grapes

Ripe grapes pickled in vinegar, though their merits are well known in Southern Russia, have never received due recognition in England. But these are delicacies rather than food.

Grapes For Dessert

At lunches, buffets, and five-o'clocks in France, strawberries, and indeed most berries, are eaten with champagne. Muscatel grapes powdered with crushed ices and anointed with sparkling wine are a favorite dessert-dish. Grapes are invariably eaten with wine in France, the bunch being dipped into the wine. Red grapes are eaten with red wine, and white grapes with-white wine.