Two years ago, some correspondents, with but a poor appreciation of the value of a free press, were gravely inquiring, in the columns of a useful and widely popular journal, whether the Horticulturist ought not to be tabooed by all pomologists; the gravamen of its offense being, that the editor was supposed to be friendly to a more general introduction of grapes, and had admitted to his pages the inquiry, whether pears on dwarfs could be profitably grown for the market. The evidences on that occasion were but in keeping with the common philosophy of life. Success is ever prone to hang its banner upon the outer walls, while failure is equally disposed to shield itself from public observation. It reminded me of an incident related by a friend who had been on a visit to New Orleans. "In driving about the city one day," said he, " my chaperone pointed out a very costly and imposing residence; that, he observed, is the residence of Mr. A., who came here from the North some twenty years ago, a poor young man; he had a good constitution, which withstood the yellow fever, and now he has amassed the princely fortune which his homestead would indicate.

But, continued he, of the twenty thousand poor young men who have come here from the North in the mean time, who did not make a fortune, who did not survive the yellow fever, and whose bones lie interred in our city churchyards, no outward sign remains, and nothing is said of them." I refer to that discussion simply to show that science never suffers from the ventilation of its facts, and that the Horticulturist, in sustaining as it should the independence of the press, has not inflicted any of the anticipated injury upon the public.

While vine culture has fortified itself vastly in popular estimation, there are probably three pear trees sold now for one at any former period of our history. A hundred thousand amateurs will every year be added to the list of those who grow dwarf pears, caring but little "if they are profitable for the market or not," if they can only grow them for themselves. Even the very difficulties and limitations of pear culture pointed out, with many minds became incentives for the experiment; for such is humanity, that " If the way be dangerous shown, The danger's self is lure alone".

Then that discussion led on to a world of practical information in pear culture well worth having, such as the proper conditions of soil and culture to insure success; the giving the trees a good start at first, and not hoping to coax them into thrift after a year or two of stint and starvation; the philosophy of deep and shallow planting, of high and low grafting, etc.; to say nothing of the hope and encouragement to those whose trees had been frozen and blighted, given by sundry fathers in pomology, who, in grave council assembled, resolved that summer's heat and winter's cold were but other terms for nonsense, ours being the best climate for pear growing in the world, the isothermal lines of our climate not being very clearly set forth on the black board of illustration.

I have heard of but two or three instances of blight, and that on a limited scale, and the present has been a very propitious year in pear growing in this region, almost all those who have trees having had fruit The leading varieties, such as the Seckel, Tyson, White Doyenne, and Genesee, fully sustained themselves, both in size and the character of their fruit; but many of the summer varieties were flavorless, probably owing to the unusual coldness of the season; even the Nelis, one of the best generally of all pears, hardly came up to its proper standard of excellence. The fruit of a Buffum tree with me (I suppose the tree to have received some injury by the water, from a spout during the winter,) cracked partially, early in the summer, but before the season was over the cracks healed up and the fruit became sound at maturity.

The blight shows itself on the pear tree in several different ways, or with different degrees of malignity; sometimes it is localized in a limb, for which the remedy is thorough amputation; sometimes the epidermis will become black, while the inner bark appears to be all right, and the tree can be saved by removing the discolored part, when a new and sound bark takes its place. The only standard tree I have left was affected in this way some years ago, and is now a sound tree, producing fruit. Another form of the blight appears to be a vitiated condition of the sap, for which I suppose there is no remedy. Persons who have trees that turn suddenly black in midsummer are apt to suppose the disease comes on at that time; but I apprehend a careful examination will always show an unsound condition of the tree several months beforehand.

It is no evidence that a tree is sound because it breaks into leaf, or even makes a reasonable growth; many a tree will do this after the bark is entirely winter-killed at the collar of the tree: pepperage or gum tree will continue to live for several years after being girdled. The solar heat at first only brings into action the sap in the body of the tree, without reference to a new supply from the root; a limb subjected to a reflected heat will often come into bloom before the rest of the tree has got fairly into bud; and this fact makes it questionable if it is practicable, as is sometimes suggested, to retard a tree so as to escape spring frosts, by the packing snow about the roots of it.

The injury which fruit trees sometimes receive from unseasonable reflected heat from the earth, suggests further experiments with our forest trees as foundations for the pear. Of the stocks on which it is known to grow, viz., the apple, crab, quince, thorn, mountain ash, and June or service berry, all but the last are more or less subject to the blight. The June berry is hardy, and if it will answer, as some correspondent says it will, it may be worthy of more extensive trial. No doubt, affinities with the pear are not all exhausted, and other trees from the forest might answer likewise. The budding a few limbs at the proper season would test the matter at a small outlay of trouble, and possibly show the truth of the old adage, that an ounce of practice is worth a pound of theory.

In 1853 I had a small vinery built, in size 20 by 22 feet, of which a report is made in the Horticulturist, in vol. iv., page 545. At the same time I devoted an equal amount of space to a dozen dwarf pear trees. The grounds have been about equally enriched since, with well-decomposed manures, and vines and trees have alike been protected in the winter with 6traw. The paid-for labor has been about the same with regard to both; therefore I make no note of it, or of the pruning the vines, thinning the fruit, and irrigation, which have throughout been a matter of personal recreation and amusement. No fire was introduced into the vinery until last year, since when some ten or fifteen times it has been used as a protection from frost. The ground between the pear trees has been annually planted with carrots and beets, and the soil kept clean, light, and in good condition.

Now, although the above is not a very good show for the pears, I would say in candor, that the trees have grown more during the last two years than they did in the preceding five; and if they had not been removed to make room for an enlargement of the grapery this fall, I have no doubt they would have told a better story for themselves hereafter. A neighbor of mine, whose orchard is on elevated ground, and whose soil is rich but rather wet, had this year a very respectable crop of pears on his trees, five years planted. If dwarf pears do not succeed m this region, it will not be for want of a fair and honest trial I will endeavor to send the editor of the Horticulturist a sample of wine made by a friend from the variety of grape described in last year's vol., page 365. It has the color and body of good port wine, and would no doubt have been a still better article if some sugar had not been used in the manufacture of it.

In my vinery I grew two good-sized canes this year horizontally on the ground, so as not to interfere at all with the fruit-bearing vines. The wood ripened well, and if the canes produce right, I will report again next year. We commenced cutting grapes in the middle of August, and are still (Dec. 17) enjoying our Muscats, crisp, fresh, and luscious as when first gathered; having thus had the fruit in eating over four months, or one third of the year. The result, then, of a seven years' experiment stands thus:

Cr.

Grapery - Fruit, bunches in 1854.......

150

Do. do. 1865.......

350

Do. do. 1856-7-8-9, 1860......

2,300

Total......................

2,800

Deduct 1/2 to reduce to pounds...........

700

At 60 cents, a low market price............

2,100

give

$1,260

Dr.

Original cost of grapery.............

$150

Add 2 years' interest till paid for by fruit...

18

For re-painting, fuel, etc., and vines.........

52

220

Apparent profit.........

$1,040

Dr.

1 dozen pear trees and freight.........

$15

Fruit in 6 years............

50

Do. in 1860............

150

Total, at 3 cents apiece..............

200

6

Loss..........

$9

[Very suggestive. The subject of "tabooing" is one for which we have little respect. An editor, above all men, ought to be independent, and his readers ought to appreciate that simple fact. It is always pleasant to have people agree with us, but then there are always two sides to a question, and a discussion is sometimes, if properly conducted, a short method of arriving at truth. You are all right on that question. You make but a poor show for the pear; we can do better than that; still, we arrive at the same conclusion, that the grape is the most profitable. We shall look for the wine expectantly. - Ed].