Chocolate

Five parts of burnt sienna and one part of carmine or lake give a rich chocolate. A less expensive color is obtained by mixing Indian red and lamp black with a little yellow ochre. A touch of vermilion will clear and brighten this mixture. Another way to produce chocolate is to mix twenty, parts of black with three parts of red, but this gives a more or less muddy shade.

Cinnamon

Six parts white lead, two parts burnt sienna. and one part of golden ochre make a good cinnamon, or French ochre, English Indian red and a little lamp black will produce the same color. Another way is to mix Italian sienna and burnt umber.

Clay Drab

Mix equal parts of white lead, raw umber and raw sienna, and add a little chrome if desired. Some painters prefer to add a little medium chrome yellow.

Cocoanut Brown

This shade may be obtained by mixing one part of white lead with double the quantity of burnt umber.

Coffee

To produce this color mix together five parts of burnt umber, two parts of yellow ochre and one part of burnt sienna.

Copper

Tint zinc white with French ochre, Italian sienna and lamp black. A very good copper shade is obtained by mixing two parts of medium chrome yellow, one part of Venetian red, and one part of drop black or two parts of lamp black, three parts of medium chrome yellow and six parts of Venetian red.

Cork Color

Tint white lead with French ochre, Indian red and a little lamp black, or with raw Italian sienna and burnt umber.

Dark Drab

French gray, Indian red and lamp black added to white lead give this color.

Dark Lava

Mix French ochre, Indian red and lamp black, and lighten with white lead.

Dark Oak

Add French ochre and Venetian red to white lead as a base.

Doe Color

This may be produced by mixing raw Italian sienna and burnt umber with white lead, or French ochre and mineral brown with a little lamp black.

Dove Color

White lead, with a little Prussian blue and a touch of ivory black will produce an excellent dove color, but French ochre, Indian red, and lamp black may be employed, or a mixture of raw and burnt Turkey umber and Italian sienna.

Drab

A good drab is made by using burnt umber and white lead in the proportion of one of the former to ten of the latter, but raw umber and a little Venetian red may be used instead.

Red Sable Brushes.

Fig. 25. Red Sable Brushes.

Fawn

This might also be called deep drab. It is produced by tinting white lead with a mixture of French ochre, Indian red and lamp black, or raw Italian sienna and raw Turkey umber. Another shade of fawn is obtained by using eight parts of white lead, one part of chrome yellow, one part of Indian red, and one part of burnt umber, or eight parts of white lead, two parts of medium chrome yellow, one part Venetian red, and one part of burnt umber.