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How To Play Golf | by Harry Vardon



Amongst games, golf has a nature peculiarly its own, and in no respect is its distinctiveness more marked than in the circumstance that it allows its devotees practically a free hand in the choice of the implements, the ball, and the extent and general characteristics of the playing ground. Golf, then, is apt to alter considerably as the seasons come and go. It is a game in which the sentiment of liberty holds sway. In point of fact, it has changed a great deal during recent years, and for that reason I offer no apology for appearing a second time as the author of a book of instruction on a subject which I have made my life-study. My first was "The Complete Golfer," which is still popular. The present work does not replace that, but supplements it in the light of recent developments.

TitleHow To Play Golf
AuthorHarry Vardon
PublisherGeorge W. Jacobs & Co
Year1912
Copyright1912, George W. Jacobs & Co
AmazonHow To Play Golf

With Forty-Eight Illustrations

-Preface
Amongst games, golf has a nature peculiarly its own, and in no respect is its distinctiveness more marked than in the circumstance that it allows its devotees practically a free hand in the choice of ...
-List Of Illustrations
Harry Vardon .... Frontispiece A Good Test for the Tee Shot in Modern Golf . . . . . .29 Grips Right and Wrong . . . .82 The ordinary grip - A frequently seen but unquestionably wrong grip. The O...
-Chapter I. The Trend Of The Game
FOR the modern beginner at golf to attain a fair degree of proficiency is, if he pursue his object in the proper way, an immeasurably easier matter than it was for any of us who started to play in the...
-The Trend Of The Game. Part 2
The confusion in the matter of arranging matches would be indescribable. As an instance, let me relate a little experience. At one time I played many games with an amateur who had the shortest swing I...
-The Trend Of The Game. Part 3
Whenever in the old days I took an iron club in my hand, I could tell to within two or three yards not only where the ball would pitch, but where it would stop. That was possible for any player who pr...
-Chapter II. Golf Course Architecture
IT is certain that, if you are going to play golf, you must have a course on which to play it, and before proceeding to consider any other phases of the game, we may reasonably devote some attention t...
-Golf Course Architecture. Part 2
A good test for the tee shot in modem golf. The player has a choice as to the length of carry which he will attempt. If he takes the straight line to the hole, and accomplishes the carry to A, he ...
-Golf Course Architecture. Part 3
We have now fixed upon fourteen holes, and the remaining four might measure anything from 420 to 580 yards. I do not think that any hole need run to 600 yards; as a rule, the very long hole affords no...
-Chapter III. Equipment: Some Trifles That Amount To Much
GOLF is a strange game: it enchants and aggravates, it flatters and disappoints, it rears up the player to believe in his efficiency and then lets him down with a crash. It is a kind of kaleidoscope i...
-Equipment: Some Trifles That Amount To Much. Part 2
It is always as well to carry two drivers - one fairly stiff and the other moderately supple. There are times when you are convinced that you can hit anything - from an ant to a golf ball. Your spirit...
-Equipment: Some Trifles That Amount To Much. Part 3
Very few caddies make good tees. The ball should be just perched on the sand so that none of the latter can be seen; the ball should seem to be sitting up clear of the ground, supported by nothing. Th...
-Chapter IV. Two Essentials Of Success
EARLY in this book the statement is made that, under present-day conditions, it is comparatively easy to enjoy a fair measure of success on the links. In the abstract, the declaration is perhaps more ...
-Two Essentials Of Success. Part 2
There was another player who, in order to overcome his inclination to spread his arms too far apart, introduced a thick india-rubber band, which he fixed from elbow to elbow. Those troublesome members...
-Two Essentials Of Success. Part 3
I have given foremost position to this matter of keeping the head still, because the. neglect of it is the cause of so much bad golf, but, as mentioned earlier in this chapter, it is absolutely necess...
-Chapter V. How To Drive
THE easiest strokes in golf are, I think, shots from the tee with a brassie and from the fairway with an iron. Therefore I would suggest to the beginner, or to the person who is almost resigned to med...
-How To Drive. Part 2
For the moment let us consider the swing. As I have previously remarked, little can go wrong if the grip be correct and the head be kept still. The latter form of restraint is, for the ordinary golfer...
-How To Drive. Part 3
Up to the present I have not attempted to describe seriatim the actions which produce the perfect swing. I have endeavoured to emphasize a fact which is unknown to or unhonoured by thousands of player...
-How To Drive. Part 4
COMING DOWN. The wrong downward swing: The body has turned too soon and the club has therefore been pushed forward. As the club should comedown, i.e., behind the flayer. Yet it is certain that th...
-Chapter VI. Cleek And Iron Shots
WHEN the iron-headed clubs come up for discussion, the golfer's first thoughts turn instinctively to the cleek. It is not an easy implement with which to obtain good results, but once the player feels...
-Cleek And Iron Shots. Continued
Stance. The player is distinctly nearer to the ball than for the drives. THE CLEEK SHOT. Top of the swing. Finish. The nearer the player is to the ball, the more upright will be the swing. T...
-Chapter VII. Mashie Shots
WE make our bow to the mashie. Let it be a friendly yet respectful salutation, born of a determination to render the introduction mutually pleasant. For the production of its best points, the mashie n...
-Mashie Shots. Part 2
Now as to the method of winding up and unwinding the body; that is to say, the method of making the swing. As I have already said, the knees are all-important. There should be no rigidity about any pa...
-Mashie Shots. Part 3
Here, then, we have the formula for the ordinary pitch-and-run stroke with the mashie - a formula which has the approval in practice of all the good players I have ever seen, and the principles of whi...
-Mashie Shots. Part 4
THE MASHIE SHOT WITH CUT. Finish for a stroke of medium length. Finish for a longer shot (say, 30 to 70 yards). Personally, I have come to like the club very well for approaching. It was with a ...
-Chapter VIII. On The Green
PUTTING is a delicate matter, and I, of all people, ought to write about it in a delicate way. The reader of this book who has honoured me by noticing my doings on the links during recent years, and h...
-On The Green. Continued
PUTTING. I cannot believe that my new friend is going to play me false. Such is the effect of confidence; the quality which, I know full well, has a way of coming and going without giving any reaso...
-Chapter IX. Recovering From Difficulties
LET us be bunkered. For a very long while we have delayed the evil happening. We have played many shots with a variety of clubs; even have we putted. We may, indeed, have arrived at the conclusion tha...
-Recovering From Difficulties. Part 2
In the chapter concerning the mashie, I have mentioned the danger of endeavouring to lift the ball into the air on the face of the club. The same warning may be proclaimed in regard to bunker shots. F...
-Recovering From Difficulties. Part 3
In this connection, the peculiarities of the seventeenth - the famous Road hole - at St Andrews at once occur to the mind. When the ground is hard, the ordinary game is to put the second shot at t...
-Chapter X. The "Push" Shot
THERE comes a period when our golf shows unmistakable evidence of improvement; a soul-satisfying time when we entertain no serious doubt as to our ability to execute a plain shot in the correct way. T...
-The "Push" Shot. Continued
I have emphasized the fact that the push-shot can be accomplished with any club in the bag, inasmuch as there seems to be a common impression that it should never be attempted with anything but a clee...
-Chapter XI. Golf In A Wind
IT is a great advantage to have learnt your golf (or to go and learn it) by the sea. Students of the game's history will not need to be informed that nearly all the leading players secured their early...
-Golf In A Wind. Part 2
The above remarks contradict, I know, my old views on the subject; but the game has altered a lot in a few years. I used to recommend the policy (which is even now an easy favourite) of striking into ...
-Golf In A Wind. Part 3
I never in my life felt less like doing those things. We duly reached the teeing ground. The first hole was a short one. The green could be reached with a cleek. Far away to the left (it looked too fa...
-Chapter XII. Some Common Faults
NUMEROUS and varied are the ills to which the golfing flesh is heir. Fortunately it is nearly always possible for an experienced player to diagnose with accuracy the disease of stance or swing which i...
-Some Common Faults. Part 2
The right stance comes readily to the golfer once he knows the game, but it does not present itself without being sought. It is seldom a gift, and it can rarely be left to look entirely after itself. ...
-Some Common Faults. Part 3
Another provocation of the pull is the fault of holding tighter with one hand than the other, and a third is turning the right hand over at the moment of impact. The first and last of these causes are...
-Chapter XIII. Prominent Players And Their Methods
NEXT to the joy of playing a round there is no more engaging occupation for the keen habitue of the links than that of studying the methods of acknowledged masters of the game. Golf can be learnt by e...
-Prominent Players And Their Methods. Continued
If you want to see the push-shot played to perfection, there is nobody better to watch than Braid. Addressing the ball with his hands a little in front of it, he takes the club back in a more upright ...
-Chapter XIV. Summer Golf And Winter Golf
CLAY is, I daresay, essential to the stability of the land - as land - and we have enough of it in all conscience in this country. There are more clayey golf courses than of any other denomination of ...
-Chapter XV. The Game Abroad
GOLF has done wonders since it found its way out of Scotland, and, in connexion with its development, nothing has been more remarkable than its progress abroad. When, just over twenty years ago, I lef...
-The Game Abroad. Continued
It was at St Augustine, in Florida, that I first saw land-crabs scuttling about a golf course. To the man who has grown tired of condemning worms for their malpractices, and allowing grudging approval...







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previous page: Hints To Golfers | by O. K. Niblick
  
page up: Golf Books
  
next page: The Game Of Golf | by William Park, Jun.