The proprietor of a hotel of small or medium capacity generally has no patience with the "red tape" methods of making requisitions, booking and checking and counter-checking, which he may hear are practiced in metropolitan establishments; he says: "if I didn't think my man was honest I would not have him in rriy house; if he is determined to steal from me he will steal anyhow, and blank forms to fill out would have no effect; my way is to hire none but those whose honesty I have confidence in, and then I trust them implicitly and let them know that I trust them." Those are the pleasant sort of men to deal with, and theirs are the houses where employer and employe's are like one family. The strict rules are not for them. But take the big city hotel where some 200 hands are employed and some among them leave every week and strange faces take their places, and the united family feature disappears and, instead, a system as hard and unsentimental prevails as any that governs a company of miners or mil! operatives.

No sympathy exists between the lowest grade of workers in the various hotel departments and employers, who each apper to be seeking to take advantage of the other whenever an opportunity occurs.

In such houses all the doors are guarded. One bears the notice "No admittance to see the help under any circumstances." Another says, "You are not allowed to remain in the store-room." Another, "You will be discharged if you come in here without permission." There the coffee-maker must count the number of cups he serves out and on no account give out a cup to any employe without express permission, the fruit room and pantry goods are all guarded with the same strictness and a watch is kept upon the hands employed in them, the same as upon the coffee-maker.

Even where a more cordial feeling exists the great number of employes makes a personal acquaintance impracticable, much less individual trust, and a strict and formal accounting in every department is adopted as a measure of the sternest necessity.

The genial hotel keeper who objects most strongly to those "red tape" measures and is slowest to buy the necessary blanks and books, after once becoming accustomed very seldom abandons them. As to how much of them should be adopted in any given size of house, must of course depend upon the disposition of the proprietor and the degree of personal attention he gives the business. The two different styles of hotel store room have been already described. Apart from the question of which is the better, many of the largest and best conducted houses have no room for a store room in connection with the kitchen, it must be in the basement because the plan of building did not allow for it upstairs. In such places the chief cook, the pastry cook, the head waiter, the housekeeper, the chief clerk and, perhaps, the barkeeper and other heads of departments write a requisition for the day's or half-day's supplies in a printed blank like this:

Hotel Belvidere, Nov. 24, 188.

Storekeeper Deliver To Bearer

Beef Loin,....

18 lbs.

" Roast...

18 "

" Butts...

21 "

Mutton..........

6 "

Veal........

16 "

Pork............

18 "

Fish....

10 "

Butter, table...

3 1/2 "

" kitchen__

2 "

Coffee....

3 1/2 "

Tea.............

. 4 oz.

Syrup...

1 quart.

Milk............

4 galls.

Lard...

2 lbs.

Oatmeal....

1 1/2 "

Grits...

4 "

Sugar cut loaf...

4 "

" powder...

4 "

" help's.....

2 1/2 "

Mackerel...

10 "

Eggs---------.....

. 6 doz.

John Smith, Chef.

The blank book from which this is torn has a duplicate form, which the chief cook, or other requisitionist, fills out with the prices and total, as follows, and keeps it:

Hotel Belvidere, Nov. 24, 188. Storekeeper Delivered To Bearer

Beef Loin...

18 lbs.@ 19c.

3

42

" Roast...

18 " 8c.

1

24

" Butts...

21 " 9c.

1

89

Mutton....

6 " 9c.

54

Veal.........

16 " 6 1/2c.

1

04

Pork........_

18 " 6 1/2c.

1

17

Fish.........

10 " 8c.

80

Butter, table..

3 1/2 " 30c.

1

05

" kitchen

2 " 20c.

40

Coffee...

3 1/2" 30c.

1

°5

Tea...

4 oz. @ 60c.

15

Syrup...

1 qt. @ 60c.

15

Milk.....

4gal@3oc.

1

20

Lard....

2 lbs.@11c.

22

Oatmeal....

1 1/2" 4c

6

Grits...

4 " 3c

12

Sugar cut loaf.

4 " 9C

36

" powder .

4 " 9c

36

" help's. -.

2 1/2" 6c.

15

Mackerel....

10 " 3c

3o

Eggs........

6doz@2oc.

1

20

$16

87

John Smith, Chef.

It may be asked: "What does the chief cook want with the duplicate, when the goods have been entered in the storekeeper's books before he receives them?" The answer is, it is a part of the unsentimental system of making one employe act as a restraint and a check upon another. The waters on watch cannot close up and leave the dining-room until the missing knife or spoon has been found or charged up to some delinquent; the chambermaid cannot get a clean towel from the linen-room until she brings the dirty one to be exchanged for it. It has been shown how the steward becomes a check upon the cook and the storekeeper upon the steward, and now the cook, and indeed each other one who makes requisitions, becomes a check upon the storekeeper.

The supposition acted upon is that the barkeeper might send for five pounds of sugar and the storekeeper might enter it in his book ten pounds; or the cook might draw twenty pounds of meat and the storekeeper might enter it thirty and might then throw five pounds of sugar and ten pounds of meat out of the window, without coming out short at the monthly stock-taking. Without looking as far as that, the cook keeps the duplicate accounts for self-protection, because the steward will come to him at night and say, "Your bill to-day was twenty dollars more than yesterday; the proprietor will expect an explanation, do you know what made the difference?" and the cook will want to know whether he has been subjected to an overcharge in the store-room and will look over his own account for that and the preceding day to See how it was, for it is to be observed that an unaccountable increase in the store-room bills fastens upon the cook the accusation of extravagance which he does not wish to incur. The pastry cook, baker, confectioner, pantryman and every other one who draws supplies is in the same position as regards their daily accounts, though none have such large amounts to answer for as the chief cook.