St. Pierre

Name often met with in foreign menus; it is a seafish, the John dory.

Sucre (Fr)

Sugar.

Sucres

Sweets.

Succotash

Indian name of a mixture of butter beans and corn cooked together, a common and popular American vegetable dish.

Suedoise

Swedish dish of fruits, compotes, placed upon rounds of fried bread, and built up in pyramidal form around a center-piece of fried bread.

Sugar Rock Work, Or Honey-Comb Candy

Used for building ornamental pieces. Having made a wooden frame about 12 or 16 inches square, and 4 inches deep, place it on a wet slab or wooden bench; take 7 lbs. loaf sugar(no lowering), boil to the caramel degree, previous to which, in a pound jar three parts filled with fine powdered sugar, mix the whites of two eggs, beat it well till stiff; when the sugar comes to the degree required, put in any color you like, take it off, pour icing in and immediately agitate the whole with the spatula; in two or three minutes it will rise to the edge of the pan, let it fall again and continue stirring, as soon as it begins to rise the second time, instantly pour it into the frame.

Many persons fail at this process from pouring out at the first rising, which on the slab becomes perfectly flat and heavy. When cool remove it by passing a fine string or Jong palate-knife underneath it.

Sunshine Cake

Yellow cake made of 1 1/4 lb. sugar, 3/4 lb. butter, 1 pint of yolks beaten with 1 pint of milk, 1 1/2 lbs. flour, 1/4 lb. rice flour, 2 teaspoons baking powder, lemon juice and rind.

Surprises

Culinary surprises, or dishes designated en surprise, are things which prove to be other than they purport to be, as when a cake filled with cream is made and colored to imitate a ham, or a baked potato is found to conceal a filling of minced meat or a bird.

Syllabub

Old English name of whipped cream flavored with wine and sweetened.

Syllabub With Jelly

Gelatine jelly of any flavor or color served in a border of whipped cream.

Syrups

Pure fruit syrups are extremely useful in hotel cooking, being always ready for sweet sauces, sherbets, ice creams, etc.

Raspberry Syrup

The juice of raspberries expressed either by twisting up tight in a strong towel or in a fruit-press made for such purposes. To 1 1/2 pints of juice 2 lbs. of sugar is added, melted over the fire, boiled a while, skimmed, filled into bottles and corked.

Red Currant Syrup

This and other fruits by the same general rule as for raspberry syrup. Ginger Syrup - 2 oz, bruised ginger boiled in 1 qt water, strained, and 2 lbs. sugar added, boiled down to syrup.

Soda Syrups

The foregoing with either dissolved gum arabic or white of egg added to form a head or froth on top.

Plain Syrup

For barkeepers' and general uses: 7 lbs. loaf sugar to- 1 quart water, boiled up, skimmed, strained.

Tamarind

The fruit of the tamarind tree which grows in the West Indies; it is in the form of a pod containing an acid pulp; the pods are packed iu casks filled up with syrup. Eaten as a sweetmeat and used to make a cooling drink.