St John, the largest river of New Brunswick, rises in Maine, flows 450 miles NE. and SE. (the last 225 within British territory), and falls into the Bay of Fundy by an estuary 5 miles wide. Part of its course separates Maine from Canada.

St John

St John, commercial capital and largest city of New Brunswick, stands on the left bank of the estuary of the St John, 277 miles by rail NW. of Halifax and 481 from Montreal. The harbour is good, and accessible to the largest vessels at all seasons. Shipbuilding and the timber-trade are the chief industries, together with fishing and the West India trade; the manufactures include engines and locomotives, machinery and farming implements, nails, axes, leather, boots and shoes, paper, cotton and woollen goods, clothing, furniture, carriages, soap, etc. On June 21, 1877, a fire destroyed the greater part of the town; but a new St John speedily arose, with wide, * clean streets, and handsome buildings - custom-house, post-office, city building, lunatic asylum, hospital, and Roman Catholic cathedral. Adjoining St John, and practically forming with it one city, is the town of Portland. Pop. (1881)26,127; (1901)40,711.

St John

St John. See Antigua.