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Gardening For Pleasure | by Peter Henderson



A guide to the amateur in the fruit, vegetable, and flower garden, with full directions for the greenhouse, conservatory, and window-garden.

TitleGardening For Pleasure
AuthorPeter Henderson
PublisherOrange Judd Company
Year1883
Copyright1883, Orange Judd Company
AmazonGardening For Pleasure

By Peter Henderson, Author Of "Gardening For Profit," And "Practical Floriculture," Jersey City Heights, N. J.

Orange Judd Company
-Introduction
I have endeavored in writing Gardening for Pleasure, to divest it, as far as I was competent to do so, of the technical terms and phrases which professional gardeners use in writing or talking on ma...
-Chapter I. Soil And Location
It is rare in determining the site for a residence, that the soil is taken into consideration, and in consequence, we sometimes find that the garden surrounding the house presents a barren appearance,...
-Chapter II. Drainage
As drainage will be in many instances indispensable to success, I will briefly state a few of the simplest methods that may be adopted, premising that it is utterly useless to expect to cultivate any ...
-Chapter III. Preparation Of The Ground
After draining, (if draining is necessary), comes the preparation of the soil. Presuming that the ground where the new garden is to be made is an open space, clear of trees or other obstructions, ther...
-Chapter IV. Walks
It is no unusual thing to see the owner of a neat cottage make himself perfectly ridiculous by the way in which he lays out the walk from the street to his front door. There is a prevailing opinion th...
-Chapter V. Manures
Whether one wishes to cultivate vegetables, fruits, or flowers, all soils, to give good results, sooner or later need manure; this is more particularly the case with what are known as vegetables, th...
-Chapter VI. How To Use Concentrated Fertilizers
Whatever kind of concentrated fertilizer may be used, I find it well repays the labor to prepare it in the following manner: to every bushel of fertilizer, add three bushels of either leaf-mold (from ...
-Chapter VII. Special Fertilizers For Particular Plants
A man called at my office a few years ago with some dozen bottles as samples of special manures, indispensable, he said, as fertilizers for certain kinds of plants. He had those with him that he claim...
-Chapter VIII. The Lawn
Since the introduction of the lawn-mowers, the keeping of the lawn has been so simplified that no suburban residence is complete without one, and there is now no more excuse for tall grass going to h...
-Chapter IX. Design For Garden
As this book is intended to comprehend all the wants of a cottage or suburban garden, including flowers, fruits, and vegetables, it would increase its size too much to give a great variety of designs ...
-Chapter X. Planting Of Lawns And Flower-Beds
The subject of lawn planting, including the proper setting and grouping of trees and shrubs, and their most effective disposal, is too extended for the scope of this book. These matters belong to work...
-The Carpet Style Of Flower-Beds
Planting, as practised at Battersea and other parks in London, is as yet but little seen with us; our public parks here have shown a lamentable want of taste in this matter, especially those of Now Yo...
-Chapter XI. Fall, Or Holland Bulbs
These bulbs are mainly such as are imported from Holland in the fall, and consist of Hyacinths, Tulips, Crocuses, Jonquils, Narcissuses, Snow-drops, and various other less known kinds. With few except...
-Hyacinths In Glasses
Although the Jonquils and Narcissuses can be grown in water in glasses as well as the Hyacinth, they are not often so treated, hyacinths being the only bulbs largely flowered in that way, some of whic...
-Chapter XII. Propagation Of Plants By Seeds
Nature provides abundantly for the reproduction of plants, and the difficulty of multiplying by one method is compensated by the ease with which it may be done in another. Whenever we find a plant tak...
-Chapter XIII. Propagation Of Plants By Cuttings
There is no more interesting operation to the amateur gardener than that of increasing his stock of plants by cuttings or slips. Heretofore, it was accounted a great mystery, and unless with some of t...
-The "Mud" Or "Saucer System Of Propagating
Take any common saucer or plate, into which put sand to the depth of an inch or so, then prepare the cuttings in the usual manner, and insert them in the sand close enough to touch each other as in Fi...
-Chapter XIV. Propagating By Layering
Although florists now rarely resort to propagation by layering, yet now and then it may be desirable for amateurs to increase the number of some favorite plant during the summer season, where no other...
-Chapter XV. About Grafting And Budding
It is often desirable to be able to bud or graft one variety of plant on another entirely different variety; and it is an interesting fact to know that the bud taken from one plant and inserted so tha...
-Chapter XVI. How Grafting And Budding Are Done
After this discussion of general principles, let us come to the practice of grafting and budding. In what has been said, they have been used as synonyms, and their object is precisely the same - to pr...
-Grafting
The various methods of grafting are too many to describe here; the simplest is the cleft graft; the stock is sawed off and the end cleft or split for a few inches down through the center, (Fig. 16); t...
-Budding
The shoot or stock to be budded upon must be in a thrifty growing state, so that the bark can be raised freely from the wood, and the bud to be inserted must be in such a state that it shows prominent...
-Chapter XVII. Treatment Of Tropical Bulbs, Seeds, Etc
Any information that can be given in an article short enough to be suitable for amateurs on a subject so extended as this must be confined to a few well known and leading plants most valued for genera...
-Chapter XVIII. The Potting Of Plants
This naturally follows the preceding chapter, and I will briefly state a few of the most important points; first of all is soil, or potting mold, often rather a troublesome thing to get by those who h...
-Chapter XIX. Winter Flowering Plants
The increase in the taste for winter-flowering plants, within the past five years, has been even more positive than that for the cultivation of plants out of doors, formerly it was rare for florists t...
-Chapter XX. Unhealthy Plants - The Remedy
Whenever plants begin to drop their leaves, it is certain that their health has been injured; this maybe due to over-potting, over-watering, over-heating, too much cold, or the application of such sti...
-Chapter XXI. Plants Suited Foe Summer Decoration
Quite a number of winter-blooming plants can also be used for flowering in the open borders in summer. Among these are Carnations, Heliotropes, Fuchsias, Geraniums, and particularly the monthly variet...
-Chapter XXII. Hanging Baskets
Baskets in which to grow plants are now made in a great variety of styles, and of different materials. What are known as rustic baskets, (Fig. 26), are made with the receptacle for the earth covered...
-Chapter XXIII. Window Gardening
Window gardening during the summer months is much more successful in England than with us, owing to a more temperate climate, and hence is there almost universally practised. In the cities especially,...
-Chapter XXIV. Parlor Gardening, Of The Cultivation Of Plants In Rooms
Parlor Gardening has to some extent been treated of under the head of winter flowering plants, but a few additional general directions for plants not specially designed for winter flowering, may be ac...
-Chapter XXV. Wabdian Cases, Ferneries, And Jardinieres
The forms of plant cases for the growth of such -plants as require a moist, still atmosphere, a condition impossible to obtain in a room in a dwelling-house, nor even in a greenhouse, unless it is spe...
-Chapter XXVI. Winter Forcing The Lilt Of The Valley
Within the past three years the fashion for the flowers of Lily of the Valley has increased to such an extent, that though the importation of roots has probably trebled each year, the price of the flo...
-Chapter XXVII. Greenhouses Attached To Dwellings
The taste engendered by growing plants in rooms often results in a desire to have more appropriate quarters for the plants, and a greenhouse follows. This always affords the most satisfaction when it ...
-Chapter XXVIII. A Detached Greenhouse Or Grapery
In cases where more extended glass structures are desired, they are better if detached from the dwelling. The structure now given in Figs. 40 and 41 is called a curvilinear span-roofed house, 100 feet...
-Chapter XXIX. Heating By Hot Water
Although we describe flues as a means of heating greenhouses or graperies, they should be used only on the score of economy; whenever one can afford to have the heating done in the best manner, by all...
-Chapter XXX. Greenhouses Or Pits, Without Artificial Heating
The directions given for heating greenhouses by hot water or by flues, apply of course only to sections of the country where the temperature during the winter months makes heating a necessity. In many...
-Chapter XXXI. Combined Cellar And Greenhouse
In connection with the description of the cold pit or greenhouse without fire heat, may be mentioned the combined cellar and greenhouse. Many years ago an accidental circumstance gave me an opportunit...
-Chapter XXXII. Hot-Beds
The sunken pit described on page 98 may be readily converted into a hot-bed; all that is necessary to do being to place hot manure or other heating material in the pit and tread it moderately firm wit...
-Chapter XXXIII. Shrubs, Climbers, And Trees
A place is seldom so small that a few choice shrubs cannot appropriately find room, and in which climbers are not desirable, while in the larger places these become important to its proper ornamentati...
-Chapter XXXIV. Hardy Herbaceous Perennials
Herbaceous perennials include those hardy plants, the stems of which die down at the approach of winter, or earlier if they have completed their growth; the roots being hardy, they remain in the same ...
-Chapter XXXV. Annual Flowering Plants
To make a selection from the bewildering number of varieties now offered in our seed catalogues, is an interesting, though it may be sometimes rather a perplexing operation. It is not very easy to giv...
-Chapter XXXVI. Flowers Which Will Grow In The Shade
There are few plants that will flower in places from which sunshine is entirely excluded. Some plants will grow well enough, developing shoots and leaves, but flowers of nearly all kinds must have som...
-Chapter XXXVII. Insects
When insects attack plants in the greenhouse, parlor, or anywhere under coyer, we can generally manage to get them under control, but when they attack plants in the open air, it is according to our ex...
-Green-Fly, Or Aphis
Green-Fly, or Aphis, is one of the most common, but fortunately most easily destroyed, of any insect that infests plants, either in-doors or out. In our greenhouses, as already stated, we fumigate twi...
-Ground Or Blue Aphis
Ground or Blue Aphis, is a close relative of the proceeding, but it gets its living from the roots down in the soil, while the Green Aphis feeds in the air on the leaves. The Blue Aphis attacks a grea...
-Ants
These are not usually troublesome unless in great numbers, yet when they appear in strong force they are often very destructive. About the simplest method we have found to get rid of them, is to lay f...
-The Red Spider
The Red Spider is one of the most insidious enemies of plants, both when under glass and in the open air in summer. It luxuriates in a hot and dry atmosphere, and the only remedy that I can safely rec...
-The Mealy Bug
The Mealy Bug, as it is generally called, is a white mealy or downy-looking insect, which is often very troublesome among hot-house plants, but rarely does any harm amongst those that can live in a co...
-Thrips
This is an insect varying in color from light yellow to dark brown, and much more active in its movements than the Green-Fly, and more difficult to destroy; when it once gets a foothold it is very des...
-The Angle Worm
This is the common worm seen in every soil in pots and in the open ground. It is harmless so far as feeding goes, for it seems never to touch plants as food, but it bores and crawls around in a way by...
-Chapter XXXVIII. Mildew
Mildew is a parasitical fungus, often seen on greenhouse and other plants, and is quickly destructive to their health. But as with all other plant troubles, it is best to prevent rather than cure. Car...
-Chapter XXXIX. Frozen Plants
When by any mishap the plants, whether in parlor or greenhouse, become frozen, either at once remove them, (taking care not to touch the leaves), to some place warm enough to be just above the point o...
-Chapter XL. Mulching
Litter of any kind placed around newly planted trees to prevent evaporation from the soil, was the original meaning of mulch, but it is at present extended to include a covering of the soil applied at...
-Chapter XLI. Are Plants In Rooms Injurious To Health?
The question whether plants may be safely grown in living rooms is now settled by scientific men, who show that whatever deleterious gases may be given out by plants at night they are so minute in qua...
-Chapter XLII. Shading
In mulching the object is to prevent evaporation from the soil, as well as to shield the roots from sudden changes of temperature; it is often necessary to protect the whole plant in this respect, and...
-Chapter XLIII. The Law Of Color In Flowers
I refer to this matter in the hope that it may be the means of saving some of my readers, not only from being duped and swindled, by a class of itinerant scamps that annually reap a rich harvest in di...
-Chapter XLIV. Pruning
Though the chapter on pruning is placed at the commencement of that division of the work which treats upon fruits, the fact must not be lost sight of that pruning is often quite as necessary upon tree...
-Chapter XLV. Hardy Grapes
Grapes can be grown in almost any soil, provided it is not a wet one, although the grape will take abundance of water when in a growing state, it must pass off quickly, else the growth will be impeded...
-The Varieties Of The Grape
Now number many hundred, and we will recommend only a very few of the most distinct sorts that have been grown long enough to allow us to be certain of their merits. Concord is perhaps more univers...
-Chapter XLVI. The Cold Grapery
I know of no addition to a country home from which such a large amount of satisfaction can be obtained at so small an outlay as from a grapery for growing the different varieties of foreign grapes. It...
-Chapter XLVII. The Hot-House Or Forcing Grapery
When grapes are forced by artificial heat, probably the best plan is that of the lean-to structure shown by the illustrations, Figs. 61, 62, and 63. Fig. 61 gives the plan, which, as in some former ...
-Chapter XLVIII. The Strawberry
Of all small fruits, none perhaps stand so high in general favor as the strawberry. Its culture is simple, and as it grows freely in almost any soil or location, no garden of any pretensions should be...
-Varieties of The Strawberry
Triomphe de Gand is one of the favorite varieties; it is of large size, fine flavor, and a fair bearer. It requires a heavy soil. Wilson's Seedling is a variety better known than any other sort; it...
-Forcing Strawberries
Those who have a greenhouse often wish to force strawberries into fruit several weeks in advance of the time that they will be ripe in the open air. It may be done in a frame or pit. The young runners...
-Raspberry
To have the Raspberry in perfection, the same preparation of soil is necessary as for the Strawberry. The canes or shoots of the Raspberry are biennial; that is, the cane or shoot that is formed one s...
-Black Caps
Black-caps or Black Raspberries have become very popular of late years, many persons being fond of their peculiar flavor. They belong to a distinct species from the ordinary Raspberries; the plants ma...
-Blackberry
The cultivation of the Blackberry is nearly similar to that of the Raspberry, except that it should be planted about one-third farther apart, and it being hardier, there is no need for covering it in ...
-Currants
The Currant is useful both for dessert and for preserving purposes. An immense weight of fruit is obtained for the space it occupies, and the ease of its culture makes it common in every garden. The r...
-Gooseberry
The Gooseberry is a fruit better suited for the climate of Britain than for ours, and it is never seen here in the perfection it attains there. It ripens just when our hottest weather occurs, forcing ...
-Figs
The Fig on account of it not being hardy in the northern states, is but little cultivated unless in tubs, which are placed in cellars or sheds to protect them during the winter months, or occasionally...
-Quince
A few Quince trees should be planted in every garden where there is any pretension to a collection of fruits. It is a tree requiring but little attention, and for that reason is often neglected, and v...
-Cherry
The Cherry-tree begins to bear usually in two or three years after planting trees of the size sold at the nurseries, and continues to annually enlarge in growth and productiveness until it often attai...
-Plum
The cultivation of the Plum is rendered nearly useless in most places by the attacks of the Curculio, or Plum Weevil. Every conceivable application to the trees has been tried without any satisfactory...
-Peach
The Peach prefers the light, dry, and warm soils, known as sandy loams. The tree is shortlived in most sections, and attains its best fruiting condition usually when from five to nine years old. The t...
-Nectarines
Nectarines are only smooth skinned peaches, requiring in all respects similar treatment to the peach. They are but little grown in this country, as they are equally liable to injury by the attacks of ...
-Apricot
The Apricot is closely related to the peach, but belongs to another species; it is less juicy, and has a flavor quite distinct from, and by some preferred to, that of the peach. The blighting Curculio...
-Apple
The apple can only be grown in gardens as a dwarf, either kept in a bush form or trained as a pyramid or other shape. The dwarf trees are made so by grafting on dwarfing stocks, while the varieties ar...
-Pears
Like apples, are grown as dwarfs and standards. The former being planted from eight to ten feet apart, the latter from ten to twelve feet. The dwarfs, budded on the quince stock, are mostly used for g...
-Chapter XLIX. Cottage Gardening - A Digression
Before taking up the subject of vegetable culture, I will relate an incident connected with cottage gardening that may interest if it doer not benefit some of those into whose hands this book may fall...
-Chapter L. The Vegetable Garden
It is perhaps best that the space allotted to vegetables should be at one side of the garden, and that for fruits at the other, at least in the beginning, though a rotation of crops or change of posit...
-Asparagus - (Asparagus Officinalis.)
Asparagus should be planted the first spring that the owner comes into possession of the land, and if the house is yet to be built, let the Asparagus-bed be planted at once, as it takes the roots two ...
-Artichoke-Globe - (Cynara Scolymus.)
The portion used of this plant is the undeveloped flower cluster, or the portion which is known as the scales of the involucre. They are boiled and served with drawn butter, but outside of France do n...
-Jerusalem Artichoke (Helianthus Tuberosus.)
This is an entirely different plant from the above, but as the two are sometimes confounded, we give engravings of both. The edible portion of this is the tuber, while that of the Globe Artichoke is t...
-Bush, Snap, Or Kidney Bean, (Phaseolus Vulgaris Var. Nanus.)
An indispensable vegetable, of easy cultivation, growing freely on almost any soil, though on well enriched land, it will be more prolific in quantity and more tender in quality. It is a plant of trop...
-Pole Bean Or Running Bean, (Phaselus Vulgaris), Lima Bean, (Phaseolus Lunatics)
Pole Beans are usually cultivated in hills three or four feet apart. The poles, (which are best made of young cedar trees), should be nine or ten feet high, and firmly fixed at least eighteen inches d...
-Beet, (Beta Vulgaris.)
Sow in shallow drills twelve to eighteen inches apart in April or May, dropping the seeds so that they will fall an inch or so apart When the plants have grown to the hight of about two inches, thin o...
-Borecole Or Kale, (Brassica Oleracea Var.)
The rather indefinite name of sprouts is given to this vegetable about New York. It is sown here in September, in rows one foot apart, treated in every way as spinach, and is ready for use in early ...
-Broccoli, (Brassica Oleracea Var.)
We persist in growing under the two distinct names of Broccoli and Cauliflower, plants which at best are nothing more than very nearly related varieties. The main difference between them is, that what...
-Brussels Sprouts, (Brassica Oleracea Var.)
This vegetable, as the engraving shows, is a variety of the cabbage which forms scarcely any terminal bud or head, but the buds along the stem, which in the ordinary cabbage remain email, are in this ...
-Cauliflower, (Brassica Oleracea Var.)
There is quite an ambition among amateur gardeners to raise early cauliflower, but as the conditions necessary to success with this are not quite bo easy to command as with most other vegetables, prob...
-Cabbage, (Brassicca Oleracea Var.)
The cabbage is so easily raised that but little space need be devoted to it here; like all of its tribe, it requires an abundance of manure for its full development. The early varieties should be eith...
-Carrot, (Daucus Carota.)
Carrots are sown any time from April to June, in rows one foot apart, covering the seed two inches deep. If the soil is light, they will be better flavored. When the plants are an inch or so high, thi...
-Celery, (Apium Graveolens.)
If I am fitted to instruct on the cultivation of any vegetable, it is this, as for many years I have cultivated nearly half a million roots annually, and this experience has resulted in greatly simpli...
-Celeriac, Or Turnip-Rooted Celery, (Apium Graveo-Lens Var.)
Is grown almost the same as the common celery, and as it requires but little earth-ing-up, the rows may be nearer together. Its turnip-like root is used as a salad, mostly by the French and Germans. I...
-Corn-Salad or Fetticus, (Fadia Allorio.)
This is sold to a considerable extent in spring in the city markets for use as an early salad. For mode of cultivation, etc., see Spinach, as it is grown in exactly the same manner. ...
-Chives, (Allium Schaeopnusum.)
An entirely hardy onion - like plant, of easy culture ; it will grow on almost any soil for years, without being transplanted. The leaves are the part used, and may be shorn off every two weeks during...
-Cress or Pepper Grass, (Lepidium Aalieam.)
A spring and summer salad plant; sow in early spring, and in succession, every week or so if desired, in rows one foot apart. The curled variety is the best, as it can be used for garnishing, as well ...
-Cress-Water, (Nasturtium Officinale.)
A hardy aquatic plant, which can only be properly cultivated where there are running streams. If there is a brook on the place, all that would be wanted for private use may be had by setting a few pla...
-Corn, (Zea Mays.)
The varieties known as Sweet, are the kinds cultivated to be used in the green state. Corn may either be planted in hills, dropping three or four seeds in a hill four feet apart each way, or in ro...
-Cucumber, (Cucumis Sativus.)
In most places where the Cucumber is grown out-doors, it is more or less troubled with the Striped Bug, but if only a few dozen hills are cultivated, it is not a very troublesome matter to pick them...
-Egg Plant, (Solanum Melongena.)
This is always an interesting vegetable to cultivate, being worthy of a place as an ornamental plant, as well as being much prized for culinary use. It is a native of the Tropics, and peculiarly tende...
-Endive, (Cichorium Endivia.)
A plant related to the lettuce. If sown in early spring, either in hot-bed or in the open ground, in April, it will be ready in May. Set out at distances of fifteen inches apart. It is mostly used tow...
-Sweet Herbs
Thyme, Sage, Basil, Sweet Marjoram, and Summer Savory are those in general use; the seeds of all except the last named, should be sown in shallow drills, one foot apart in May, and the plants will be ...
-Garlic, (Allium Sativum.)
Is used mostly by Europeans; it grows freely on any soil; the sets, obtained by breaking up the old bulbs, are planted in early spring in rows one foot apart, and five or six inches between the plants...
-Horseradish, (Nasturtium Armoracia.)
For family use a few roots of this should be planted in some out-of-the-way corner of the vegetable garden; a dozen roots, once- planted, will usually give enough for a life-time, as it increases and ...
-Kohlrabi, Or Turnip-Rooted Cabbage, (Brassica Oleracea-Var.)
This vegetable resembles a turnip, but is regarded as a plant, yet in order that it may be handy to get at in winter, it is better to put it in trenches, as advised for preserving celery, Fig. 87. ...
-Lettuce, (Lactuca Sativa.)
Lettuce should be sown in a hot-bed or greenhouse if wanted early; seeds sown there in February will give nice plants to set out in April, to mature in May, or if it is sown in the open ground in Apri...
-Martynia, (Martynia Proboscidea.)
The unripe pods taken when perfectly tender, are used for pickling. They must be gathered every day or two, or some will become hard and useless. Sow in open ground in May, and transplant to two feet ...
-Musk Melon, (Cucumis Melo.)
The cultivation of the Melon is almost identical with that of the cucumber, to which reference may be made. The varieties are numerous, those named below are the most popular. Green Citron Me...
-Water Melon (Citrullus Vulgaris.)
The cultivation of the Water Melon is in all respects similar to that of the Musk Melon, except that being a larger and stronger growing plant, it requires to be planted at greater distances. The hill...
-Mushroom, (Agaricus Campestris.)
Many who have a taste for horticultural pursuits grow mushrooms as much for the novelty of the thing as for the use, for it is certainly very gratifying for an amateur to find that he has succeeded wi...
-Indian Cress Nasturtium, (Tropceolum Majus.)
A highly ornamental plant, cultivated in flower-gardens as well as in the kitchen garden. The shoots and flowers are sometimes used in salads, but it is mainly grown for its fruit or seed pods, which ...
-Okra Or Gumbo, (Abelmoschus Esculentus.)
A vegetable of the easiest culture. Sow in drills in May, three feet apart for dwarf, and four feet for tall sorts, in drills two or three inches deep. The long pods when very young and tender, are us...
-Onion, (Allium Cepa.)
Onions are raised either by sets, which are small dry onions grown the previous year, or from seeds. When grown from the sets, they should be planted out as early in spring as the ground is dry enou...
-Parsley, (Carum Petroselinum.)
But a very small quantity of this is usually wanted in the family garden. Sow in shallow drills in April or May. A good plan is to sow in shallow boxes as much as may be needed; they can be placed whe...
-Parsnip, (Pustinaca Sativa.)
For mode of cultivation of parsnips, see carrot, as their culture is identical, except that this being hardy, can be left out in winter, while in this latitude carrots cannot. A portion of the crop ma...
-Pea, (Pisum Sativum.)
The pea is indispensable in the garden, and there is more satisfaction in growing it on one's own ground, than there is in raising any other vegetable. If too old when picked, or stale, which is too o...
-Pepper, Or Capsicum, (Capsicum Annuum.)
The Pepper is sown and cultivated in all respects the same as the Egg-Plant, which may be referred to. The varieties are the Bull-Nose, or Bell, and the Cayenne. ...
-Potato, (Solatium Tuberosum.)
Potatoes are grown by planting the tubers, either cut or whole, it makes but little difference which; if large, cut them; if small, leave them uncut. They are usually planted in drills three feet apar...
-Pumpkin, (Cucurbita Pepo.)
Pumpkins are still grown in many gardens with a tenacity that is astonishing, when it should long ago have been known that they have no business there, as their first cousins, the squashes, are eminen...
-Radish, (Raphanus Sativus.)
One of the first vegetables that we crave in spring is the Radish, and it is so easy of culture that every family can have it fresh, crisp, and in abundance. The smallest garden patch of a few feet sq...
-Rhubarb Or Pie Plant, (Rheum Rhaponticum.)
Rhubarb may be planted in either fall or spring, using either plants raised from the seed, or sets obtained by divisions of the old roots, taking care to have a bud to each. Set at distances of three ...
-Salsify, Or Oyster Plant, (Tragapogon Porrifolius.)
The culture of this vegetable is the same in all respects as for carrots, which see. Like the parsnip, it is hardy, and can he left out during winter in any district without injury from frost. It is r...
-Scorzonera - Black Salsify, (Scorzonera Hispanica.)
This is somewhat different in flavor from Salsify, and is preferred to it by many; it has much broader leaves, but it is cultivated and used in the same manner. ...
-Sea Kale, (Crambe Maritima.)
Sea Kale is a favorite vegetable in European gardens, but here, as yet, almost unknown. Anticipating that at no distant day it may bo as generally cultivated as it deserves to be, I briefly describe t...
-Shallots, (Allium Ascalonicum.)
A plant of the onion genus, which is cultivated by setting out the divided roots in September in rows a foot apart, allowing six inches between them. It is entirely hardy, and fit for use in early spr...
-Spinach, (Spinacia Oleracea.)
Spinach is a vegetable of easy culture. It may either be sown in spring or fall. If in fall, the proper time is from the 10th to the 25th of September, in rows one foot apart; sow rather thickly. Cove...
-New Zealand Spinach, (Tetragonia Expansa.)
This is a remarkable plant, of low branching habit, and grows with surprising luxriance during hot weather. Single plants often measure from five to eight feet in diameter. The leaves are need exactly...
-Squash, (Cucurbita Pepo And C Maxima.)
The summer varieties are, among others, the White and Yellow Bush and Summer Crookneck. As with all plants of this class, it is useless to sow these before warm weather in May, and the directions give...
-Sweet Potato, (Ipomcea Batatas.)
It is useless to attempt to grow the Sweet Potato on anything but a light and dry. soil. On clayey soils the plant not only grows poorly, but the potatoes raised upon such soil are watery, and poorly ...
-Tomato, (Lycopersicum Esculentum.)
If any vegetable is grown in a family garden, it is almost certain to be the Tomato. Hundreds of people who have only a few feet of ground at their disposal, manage to cultivate a dozen or two of toma...
-Turnip, (Brassica Campestris.)
The Turnip, if wanted for an early crop, is sown in early spring, as directed for beets. The best sorts are the varieties known as White and Purple-top Strap-leaved and Yellow Aberdeen. If for winter ...
-General Instructions
In concluding the section of this book devoted to vegetable growing, we will give a few general instructions that may have been omitted in the details already given. In sowing all kinds of seeds, more...
-Chapter LI. Garden Implements
The tool-shed is an important and necessary appendage to a well kept garden. The following list includes such implements as are generally needed in private gardens: The Wheelbarrow The wheelbarr...
-Garden Implements. Continued
The Grass Edging Knife The Grass Edging Knife, (Fig. 119), is used for cutting the grass edgings of flower-beds, its rounded edge fitting into curved lines, for which the spade would be unsuitable....
-Lawn Scythes
The lawn scythe is now but little used, the lawn mower taking its place, unless on hill-sides or among trees or shrubs, where the lawn mower cannot be worked. Lawn Mowers, (Fig. 115). - The great impr...
-Trellises
Trellises, or supports for plants, are needed in the flower and vegetable garden not only for climbers, but for keeping plants which have weak stems within proper bounds. Trellises for pots may be pur...
-Monthly Calendar Of Operations. January
Although I have endeavored throughout the foregoing pages to be particular in stating the season or date at which each gardening operation should be done, still it may save time to the novice, and be ...
-February
Greenhouse And Flower-Garden The directions for January will in the main apply to this month, except that now some of the hardier annuals may be sown, and also the propagation of plants by cuttings...
-March
Greenhouse And Flower-Garden Brighter sunshine and longer days will now begin to show their effects by a rapid growth of plants in the greenhouse, and also in those of the parlor or window garden; ...
-April
Greenhouse And Flower-Garden Plants whether grown in greenhouse or in windows, will require increased ventilation and water this month, and as they will now be growing rapidly, due attention must b...
-May
Greenhouse And Flower Garden The majority of plants in the greenhouse or window garden should now be in their finest bloom. Firing may now be entirely dispensed with in the greenhouse, though care ...
-June
Greeehouse And Flower-Garden The greenhouse may now be used for hot-house or tropical plants, if such are desired during the summer months. It should now be well shaded and fine specimens of fancy ...
-July
Greenhouse And Flower-Garden But little may be said of the greenhouse this month. Watering, ventilating, and fumigating, (or the use of tobacco in other forms for destruction of aphis), must be att...
-August
Greenhouse And Flower-Garden The instructions for July apply with but little variation in these departments this month. Fruit-Garden Strawberries that were planted in spring, and also those t...
-September
Greenhouse And Flower-Garden Towards the end of the month in many sections, the more tender plants will require to be put in the greenhouse, or housed in some way, but be careful to keep them as co...
-October
Greenhouse And Flower-Garden In almost all northern localities, all tender plants yet outside should be got under cover the early part of this month. Avoid the use of fire heat as long as possible;...
-November
Greenhouse And Flower-Garden All plants should now be \in-doors; a sharp look-out must be kept for cold snaps. These often come very unexpectedly in November, and as many plants are injured by fros...
-December
Greenhouse And Flower-Garden We are now fairly into winter, and close attention must be given to protecting all tender plants. It is one of the commonest complaints, especially from ladies, that th...
-Gardening For Profit: A Guide To The Successful Cultivation Of The Market And Family Garden
By Peter Henderson. Finely Illustrated This work has had a constant and remarkable sale ever since it was issued, and the later enlarged and revised edition is as well received as was the first ...
-Florists' Plants
By Peter Henderson, Bergen City, N. J., Author Of Gardening For Profit. MR. HENDENSON is known as the largest Commercial Florist m the country. In the present work he gives a toll account of his ...









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