1. Scutellaria Lateriflora, (Mad-Dog) Skullcap

Scutellaria Lateriflora, (Mad-Dog) Skullcap. The dried plant, official 1860-1910; N. America, United States, damp thickets, ditch banks. Perennial herb .3-.6 M. (1-2°) high; stem branched, smooth, quadrangular; leaves opposite, 5 Cm. (2') long, ovate-lanceolate, acuminate, coarsely serrate, rounded at base, petiolate; flowers 6 Mm. (1/4') long, 1-sided axillary leafy racemes, pale blue corolla and bilabiate calyx, closed in fruit, upper lip helmet-shaped, including 4 didynamous stamens (upper pair shorter); odor slight; taste bitter; solvents: diluted alcohol, boiling water; contains scutellarin, volatile oil, tannin, sugar. Tonic, nervine, antispasmodic; epilepsy, hysteria, nervous exhaustion, chorea, delirium tremens, tremors, spasms, muscular twitching, hyperaethesia, neuralgia, convulsions, intermittents, enuresis, hydrophobia. Dose, 3ss-l (2-4 Gm.); decoction, 5 p. c, ℥j-2 (30-60 Ml. (Cc.)); extract, gr. 5-10 (.3-.6 Gm.); fluidextract (diluted alcohol), 3ss-l (2-4 ML (Cc.)). S. integrifo'lia, hairy, racemes terminal, S. pilo'sa, hairy, racemes terminal, leaves in distant pairs, S. galericvla'ta, nearly smooth, flowers single, axillary; all used interchangeably.

Fig. 328.   A, Marrubium vulgare (Nat.); a, calyx (X 3). B, spurious marrubium

Fig. 328. - A, Marrubium vulgare (Nat.); a, calyx (X 3). B, spurious marrubium

(Nat.); b, calyx (X 3).

2. Marru'Bium Vulga'Re, (White, Common) Horehound

Marru'Bium Vulga'Re, (White, Common) Horehound. The dried leaves and flowering tops, official 1820-1910; Europe, C. Asia, N. America, cultivated in waste places, gardens, etc. Perennial herb .3-.6 M. (1-2°) high, with short rootstock; stems numerous, annual, branched below, quadrangular, tomentose, woolly; leaves 1.5-5 Cm. (3/5-2') long, opposite, petiolate, roundish-ovate, obtuse, coarsely crenate, strongly rugose-veined, white-hairy; flowers whitish, in dense, axillary whorls, calyx 10-toothed, divisions slightly unequal, erect-spreading, pungent; corolla small, bilabiate, 4 included stamens; fruit of 4 ovoid, obtuse, nearly smooth nutlets, 1.5 Mm. (1/16) long; odor distinct, agreeable; taste aromatic, bitter; solvents: diluted alcohol, boiling water; contains volatile oil, marrubiin (bitter amaroid), C21H28O4, .02-4 p. c, resin, tannin, gum, albumin, salts. Stimulant, tonic, bitter stomachic, resolvent, anthelmintic (large doses - diuretic, diaphoretic, laxative); dyspepsia, bronchitis, chronic hepatitis, jaundice, amenorrhoea, phthisis, cachexia, catarrh, chronic rheumatism, intermittents. Dose, 3ss-l (2-4 Gm.); extract, gr. 5-10 (.3-.6 Gm.); fluidextract, 5ss-l (2-4 Ml. (Cc.)); infusion (sweetened and flavored to liking), 5 p. c., ℥j-2 (30-60 Ml. (Cc))j juice (succus marrubii), 3j-2 (4-8 Ml. (Cc.)), in honey or milk; owing to bitterness, the lozenge (cough drop) is the most popular form for administration.

Fig. 329.   Salvia officinalis.

Fig. 329. - Salvia officinalis.

Thymus Thyme 683Fig. 330.   Salvia officinalis, flower: a, b, filaments; c, connective; d, fertile anthers; e, sterile anthers.

Fig. 330. - Salvia officinalis, flower: a, b, filaments; c, connective; d, fertile anthers; e, sterile anthers.