Polk, the name of 12 counties in the United States. L A S. W. county of North Carolina, bordering on South Carolina, and drained by affluents of Broad river; area, about 250 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 4,349, of whom 978 were colored. The surface is hilly and the soil good, especially along the watercourses. The Blue Ridge mountains are on the W. border. The chief productions in 1870 were 3,808 bushels of wheat, 3,696 of rye, 117,060 of Indian corn, and 5,937 of oats. There were 358 horses, 2,400 cattle, 1,851 sheep, and 4,975 swine. Capital, Columbus.

II. A N. W. County Of Georgia

A N. W. County Of Georgia, bordering on Alabama and drained by the Tallapoosa and other streams; area, about 500 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 7,822, of whom 2,578 were colored. It has an undulating surface and a light sandy soil. The Selma, Rome, and Dalton railroad crosses the ST. W. corner. The chief productions in 1870 were 45,497 bushels of wheat, 126,750 of Indian corn, 23,410 of oats, 36,320 lbs. of butter, and 2,001 bales of cotton. There were 463 horses, 788 milch cows, 1,302 other cattle, 1,916 sheep, and 4,407 swine. Capital, Cedartown.

III. A Central County Of The Peninsula Of Florida

A Central County Of The Peninsula Of Florida, bounded S. E. by Kissimee river and lake, and drained by Pease creek; area, 1,944 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 3,169, of whom 482 were colored. It contains numerous small lakes. The surface is low and the soil moderately productive. The chief productions in 1870 were 97,225 bushels of Indian corn, 87,470 of sweet potatoes, 346 bales of cotton, and 14,200 lbs. of rice. There were 417 horses, 525 mules and asses, 21,648 cattle, and 8,460 swine. Capital, Pease Creek.

IV. A S. E. County Of Texas

A S. E. County Of Texas, intersected by Trinity river; area, 1,188 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 8,707, of whom 4,298 were colored. Its surface is nearly level, and the soil along the Trinity very fertile. The chief productions in 1870 were 206,328 bushels of wheat, 45,151 of sweet potatoes, 4,548 bales of cotton, 33,865 lbs. of butter, and 17,869 gallons of molasses. There were 1,856 horses, 644 mules and asses, 3,492 milch cows, 1,234 working oxen, 8,721 other cattle, 1,900 sheep, and 15,154 swine. Capital, Livingston.

V. A W. County Of Arkansas

A W. County Of Arkansas, bordering on Indian territory, watered by the Washita and several branches of Red river; area, about 1,000 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 3,376, of whom 45 were colored. It has a hilly surface and a generally fertile soil. The chief productions in 1870 were 75,883 bushels of Indian corn, 5,349 of oats, 7,713 of sweet potatoes, and 259 bales of cotton. There were 611 horses, 747 milch cows, 1,665 other cattle, 1,267 sheep, and 5,849 swine. Capital, Dallas.

VI. A S. E. County Of Tennessee

A S. E. County Of Tennessee, bordered E. by North Carolina and S. by Georgia, and drained by the Hiawassee river and one of its branches, the Tocoa or Ococe; area, about 300 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 7,369, of whom 313 were colored. It has a mountainous surface and a moderately fertile soil, and contains copper mines. The chief productions in 1870 were 35,726 bushels of wheat, 152,425 of Indian corn, 17,192 of oats, 5,244 lbs. of tobacco, 10,429 of wool, 45,659 of butter, and 10,-173 gallons of sorghum molasses. There were 715 horses, 1,057 milch cows, 1,814 other cattle, 4,642 sheep, and 5,537 swine. Capital, Benton.

VII. A N. W. County Of Wisconsin

A N. W. County Of Wisconsin, separated from Minnesota on the west by the St. Croix river, and drained by several streams; area, about 900 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 3,422. The chief productions in 1870 were 41,029 bushels of wheat, 10,839 of Indian corn, 52,564 of oats, 3,097 tons of hay, and 68,203 lbs. of butter. There were 976 horses, 834 milch cows, 1,267 other cattle, 745 sheep, and 914 swine. Capital, Osceola Mills.

VIII. A N. W. County Of Minnesota

A N. W. County Of Minnesota, separated from Dakota by the Red river; area, about 4,500 sq. m.; returned as having no population in 1870. It is drained by Red Lake and Wild Rice rivers and other affluents of the Red. The valleys contain good farming lands.

IX. A Central County Of Iowa

A Central County Of Iowa, intersected from N. W. to S. E. by the Des Moines river, and across the N. E. by the Skunk river, and watered also by the Raccoon and other branches of the Des Moines; area, 720 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 27,857. It has a rolling surface and fertile soil. The Chicago, Rock Island, and Pacific and the Des Moines Valley railroads pass through the county. The chief productions in 1870 were 366,423 bushels of wheat, 1,779,875 of Indian corn, 176,399 of oats, 17,253 of barley, 132,172 of potatoes, 382,606 of butter, 15,992 of wool, and 25,533 tons of hay. There were 6,726 horses, 5,818 milch cows, 5,695 other cattle, 9,032 sheep, and 28,626 swine; 3 manufactories of agricultural implements, 12 of carriages and wagons, 3 of iron castings, 5 of machinery, 11 of saddlery and harness, 2 of woollens, 1 pork-packing establishment, 2 bookbinderies, and 6 flour mills. Capital, Des Moines, which is also the capital of the state.

X. A S. W. County Of Missouri

A S. W. County Of Missouri, watered by affluents of the Osage river; area, 750 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 12,445, of whom 259 were colored. The surface is undulating or level, and the soil fertile. The chief productions in 1870 were 117,999 bushels of wheat, 552,612 of Indian corn, 155,661 of oats, 26,925 of potatoes, 3,406 tons of hay, 11,610 lbs. of tobacco, 32,957 of wool, 150,221 of butter, and 21,631 gallons of sorghum molasses. There were 5,433 horses, 1,092 mules and asses, 4,055 milch cows, 875 working oxen, 6,170 other cattle, 16,681 sheep, and 22,411 swine. Capital, Bolivar.

XI. An E. Central County Of Nebraska

An E. Central County Of Nebraska, bounded N. W. by the Platte river, and intersected by the N. fork of the- Big Blue; area, about 400 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 136. The surface consists mostly of rolling and productive prairies. The chief productions in 1870 were 1,509 bushels of wheat, 1,540 of Indian corn, 450 of oats, 530 of potatoes, and 75 tons of hay; value of live stock, $11,315. Capital, Osceola.

XII. A W. County Of Oregon

A W. County Of Oregon, bounded E. by the Willamette river and W. by the Coast mountains, and watered by La Creole and other rivers; area, 900 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 4,701. The surface is diversified and the soil generally fertile. The chief productions in 1870 were 303,338 bushels of wheat, 199,405 of oats, 22,953 of potatoes, 55,203 lbs. of wool, 142,778 of butter, and 6,128 tons of hay. There were 3,863 horses, 3,092 milch cows, 4,411 other cattle, 16,046 sheep, and 12,380 swine; 5 manufactories of saddlery and harness, 1 of woollens, 1 flour mill, and 4 saw mills. Capital, Dallas.