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Our Workshop



Being A Practical Guide To The Amateur In The Art Of Carpentry And Joinery

TitleOur Workshop
AuthorAnonymous
PublisherThomas O'Kane
Year1873
Copyright1873, Thomas O'Kane
AmazonOur Workshop

Profusely Illustrated.

-Carpentry And Joinery
WE are sorry to be obliged to admit, that to enter into a scientific investigation of the mechanical principles on which the art of Carpentry depends, would be worse than useless. By so doing, we shou...
-Chapter I. The Bench
It is our intention to notice many things, however trivial, that may in any way serve to enlighten our readers respecting the joiner's art. Many of the most extensive works are produced by the proper ...
-Chapter II. How To Use The Tools
CARPENTRY, like every other important art, demands much attentive practice, before even a moderate degree of proficiency can be acquired. Any one accustomed to mechanical manipulation can tell whether...
-How To Use The Tools. Part 2
The toothed edge of the saw should be held nearly vertically in the thrust, or cutting strokes. If it be allowed to become much inclined to the work, the depth to be sawn is practically increased, and...
-How To Use The Tools. Part 3
Fig. 8. Fig. 9. Fig. 10. Planes having single irons are much less laborious to handle, but the work executed by them is neither so smooth nor so truthful as that of the double-ironed descript...
-How To Use The Tools. Part 4
The oilstone, like the grindstone, requires uniform wear to keep it in good order. Next to the Turkey oilstone, the Charnley Forest is esteemed by joiners and others as the best for giving a fine...
-How To Use The Tools. Part 5
The planes being in good order, the wood to be planed must be laid on the bench, the stop, S, fig. 1, being adjusted so as to stand about one-eighth of an inch below the general level of the plank. If...
-How To Use The Tools. Part 6
Fig. 15. Fig. 16. - The Square. The square (fig. 16) is the tool by which the truth of all right-angled surfaces is. ascertained. The joiner's square consists of a steel blade, which is made qui...
-How To Use The Tools. Part 7
The result of this treatment will be to leave the far corner too high, but this can be rectified by turning the board and bringing the front edge towards the workman. The plane is again used as before...
-Chapter III. Remarks On The Seasoning And Choice Of The Woods
IT is impossible to construct sound and durable work, if the material employed be green or unseasoned: the firmest joints that can be made will part, and the entire fabric become distorted and worthle...
-Remarks On The Seasoning And Choice Of The Woods. Part 2
Oak is a very hard and durable wood, easily distinguishable by its yellowish-brown colour. The English oak is esteemed the best, and is very extensively employed for ship-building, carpentry, substant...
-Remarks On The Seasoning And Choice Of The Woods. Part 3
Pear-tree is a brown wood, much used by the Tunbridge turner. In many of its properties it is similar to lime-tree, but harder and tougher. It is largely employed for carved works, and the engraved bl...
-Chapter IV. Various Methods Op Joining Timber
THE practical carpenter displays his skill by the judicious choice of that form of connection which will, with the least waste of material, insure the firmest junction of the pieces to be united. He h...
-Chapter V. Simple Works In Wood
WHEN a young fellow enters a carpenter's shop as an apprentice his master will give him plenty of hard initiatory work, which may seem useless and irksome. He will be required to rip long pieces of sc...
-Simple Works In Wood. Part 2
The sides, A, B, and C, are now supposed to be finished; it therefore only remains to operate on D to complete the work. The edge or fourth side, D, might be planed at right angles to the first side, ...
-Simple Works In Wood. Part 3
It will be found that the cross-grain of the end pieces quickly absorbs the glue, therefore its application must be repeated several times before the usual quantity will remain on the surface. Glue wi...
-Simple Works In Wood. Part 4
When a truly flat board of considerable width is required it would be unwise to employ one plank, even supposing we could find a piece of sufficiently large growth suitable for our purpose. We have al...
-Simple Works In Wood. Part 5
This clamp is frequently employed for strengthening and retaining in shape the light covers of boxes, office writing-desks, etc. The board, W, will not be required of large dimensions for the purposes...
-Simple Works In Wood. Part 6
4. The clout is used for nailing iron and other metal work to wood. The head is flat and circular, and the shank round, terminating in a sharp point. 5. Counterclout nails have countersinks, or con...
-Simple Works In Wood. Part 7
Occasionally the pincers (fig. 38) must be used to extract a nail which has become hopelessly crippled. If the nail be very fast, as it often is in hard wood, one of the bows of the pincers must be al...
-Simple Works In Wood. Part 8
Fig. 40. Fig. 41. A hole must be made for the screw, but not larger than is absolutely necessary, as any excess of size will rob the screw of a part of its hold. There is, however, danger of split...
-Simple Works In Wood. Part 9
Fig. 34 represents the tenon, sash, carcase, and clove-tail saws, which may be spoken of collectively as back-saws. The tenon saw is the largest, and the dove-tail the smallest of the group. These saw...
-Simple Works In Wood. Part 10
The bevil, however, can be employed for any angle by simply altering the position of the blade, which is attached to the stock by a pin that affords the requisite freedom. This tool is very useful for...
-Chapter VI. Grooving Planes, Etc
THERE are many joinery works which cannot be conveniently united by nails and screws, and even glue in some situations would be of little service. The strength and neatness of many works depend on the...
-Grooving Planes, Etc. Part 2
Fig. 66. Fig. 67. It is evident that the distance of the groove from the edge of the work against which the fence rubs, is limited to the length of the transverse stems, s, s, fig. 66. Frequentl...
-Grooving Planes, Etc. Part 3
The tongue on the sash-bar is generally worked by a sash-plane, which is expressly qualified for the purpose; a fillister may, however, be employed in its absence. The moulding now in general favour f...
-Chapter VII. Mortising And Tenoning
THE ordinary and simplest form of mortise and tenon is shown in fig. 79. We have already observed that the tenon must not be less than one-third the thickness of the scantling, or it will be weaker th...
-Mortising And Tenoning. Part 2
The tenon is not necessarily cut back from the inside, unless a groove for a panel is made in the inner edges of the styles and rails. In this case the inner edge of the tenon is made level with the b...
-Mortising And Tenoning. Part 3
The necessity for true and careful workmanship will be fully admitted when the four members of the frame are attached. If either a tenon or a mortise be, even in the slightest degree, out of square, t...
-Chapter VIII. Dovetailing
A BOX which is either simply glued or nailed together, can be considered only as a very rough specimen of joinery. If however, the sides be dovetailed together, and the work be neatly executed, it wil...
-Dovetailing. Continued
If the spaces between the dovetails be carefully removed without entirely obliterating the marks which were made by the scriber, the pins and dovetails will be a little too large, and by slightly comp...
-Chapter IX. Veneering
OUR readers already know that veneering is the art of glueing a very thin sheet of valuable wood upon a thick piece of a cheaper description. Veneer is laid either with a caul or the veneering hammer...
-Chapter X. Varnishing And French Polishing
THE beauty of the handsomely-figured woods is greatly enhanced by polishing, and the surface of the work is also less likely to be affected by moisture. Pine and other soft woods which are frequently ...
-Varnishing And French Polishing. Continued
If the work is required to be very highly finished, the varnish may be polished when the last coat has become thoroughly hard. It is presumed that the surface is free from brush-marks, or other blemis...







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