Pike, the name of counties in ten of the United States.

I. A N. E. County Of Pennsylvania

A N. E. County Of Pennsylvania, separated from New York and New Jersey, which there form an angle, by the Delaware river, and drained by Lackawaxen and Shohola creeks; area, about 600 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 8,436. It has a rough, hilly surface and indifferent soil, with forests that yield large quantities of timber. The N. part is traversed by the Delaware and Hudson canal, and the Erie railway and Honesdale branch. The chief productions in 1870 were 6,064 bushels of wheat, 22,369 of rye, 56,815 of Indian corn, 28,654 of oats, 29,522 of buckwheat, 71,910 of potatoes, 8,974 tons of hay, and 161,179 lbs. of butter. There were 832 horses, 2,142 milch cows, 2,066 other cattle, 1,237 sheep, and 1,560 swine; 1 manufactory of jewelry, 5 tanneries, 2 currying establishments, 1 flour mill, and 11 saw mills. Capital, Milf ord.

II. A W. County Of Georgia

A W. County Of Georgia, bordered W. by Flint river and drained by Big Potato, Elkins, and other creeks; area, about 400 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 10,905, of whom 4,906 were colored. It has an uneven surface and moderately fertile soil. It is intersected by the Macon and Western railroad. The chief productions in 1870 were 30,135 bushels of wheat, 182,045 of Indian corn, 18,868 of oats, 24,745 of sweet potatoes, 51,116 lbs. of butter, and 5,676 bales of cotton. There were 701 horses, 1,113 mules and asses, 1,652 milch cows, 3,240 other cattle, 1,817 sheep, and 6,253 swine. Capital, Zebulon.

III. A S. E. County Of Alabama

A S. E. County Of Alabama, bordered E. by Pea river and drained by the Conecuh river and its branches; area, about 700 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 17,413, of whom 4,625 were colored. Its surface is undulating, much of it covered with pine; the soil is not very fertile. The Mobile and Girard railroad terminates at the county seat. The chief productions in 1870 were 309,965 bushels of wheat, 64,451 of sweet potatoes, and 7,192 bales of cotton. There were 1,615 horses, 1,323 mules and asses, 3,521 milch cows, 1,879 working oxen, 6,814 other cattle, 2,878 sheep, and 24,433 swine. Capital, Troy.

IV. A S. County Of Mississippi

A S. County Of Mississippi, bordering on Louisiana and drained by Bogue Chitto river and its branches; area, about 850 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 11,303, of whom 5,312 were colored. It is intersected by the New Orleans, Jackson, and Great Northern railroad. The chief productions in 1870 were 151,891 bushels of Indian corn, 28,546 of sweet potatoes, 10,662 of peas and beans, and 4,133 bales of cotton. There were 1,162 horses, 1,777 milch cows, 4,454 other cattle, 4,145 sheep, and 7,560 swine. Capital, Holmesville.

V. A S. W. County Of Arkansas

A S. W. County Of Arkansas, drained by the Little Missouri river and its branches; area, about 600 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 3,788, of whom 421 were colored. It has a hilly surface and fertile soil. The chief productions in 1870 were 122,358 bushels of Indian corn, 10,842 of sweet potatoes, and 1,109 bales of cotton. There were 798 horses, 1,390 milch cows, 2,303 other cattle, 2,068 sheep, and 9,861 swine. Capital, Murfreesborough.

VI. A County Of Kentucky

A County Of Kentucky, in the extreme E. corner of the state, bordering on Virginia and "West Virginia, drained by the W. fork of Big Sandy river; area, 400 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 9,562, of whom 102 were colored. It has a hilly surface, the Cumberland mountains extending along the S. E. border and a spur partly along the S. W. There are extensive beds of bituminous coal. The chief productions in 1870 were 13,401 bushels of wheat, 332,802 of Indian corn, 25,035 of oats, 23,244 of Irish potatoes, 14,607 of sweet potatoes, 81,966 lbs. of butter, 16,811 of wool, and 17,157 of tobacco. There were 1,445 horses, 3,087 milch cows, 1,943 working oxen, 3,185 other cattle, 7,670 sheep, and 15,509 swine. Capital, Piketon.

VII. A S. County Of Ohio

A S. County Of Ohio, intersected by the Scioto river and drained by several branches; area, about 425 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 15,447. It has a diversified surface and fertile soil. It is intersected by the Ohio canal. The chief productions in 1870 were 62,815 bushels of wheat, 740,557 of Indian corn, 108,178 of oats, 59,129 of potatoes, 6,446 tons of hay, 20,105 lbs. of tobacco, 36,852 of wool, 215,631 of butter, and 35,836 gallons of sorghum molasses. There were 4,174 horses, 3,080 milch cows, 6,088 other cattle, 14,261 sheep, and 13,102 swine; 5 flour mills, 15 tanneries, 11 saw mills, and 1 woollen mill. Capital, Waverley.

VIII. A S. W. County Of Indiana

A S. W. County Of Indiana, bordered N. by White river and drained by Patoka and S. Patoka creeks; area, 837 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 13,779. It has a gently undulating surface and a generally fertile soil. It is intersected by the Wabash and Erie canal. The chief productions in 1870 were 167,262 bushels of wheat, 566,709 of Indian corn, 53,-084 of oats, 21,624 of potatoes, 121,671 lbs. of butter, 40,112 of wool, 1,119,356 of tobacco, and 4,067 tons of hay. There were 4,311 horses, 3,041 milch cows, 5,101 other cattle, 17, 331 sheep, and 26,413 swine. Capital, Peters-burgh. IX A W. county of Illinois, separated from Missouri on the southwest by the Mississippi river, bounded E. by the Illinois*, and drained by McKee's, Bay, and Little Muddy creeks; area, about 750 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 30,768. A lateral channel of the Mississippi, called Snycartee slough, traverses the county. It has a rolling surface, about equally divided between forest and prairie, and the soil is very fertile. It contains large quantities of coal. The Hannibal division and the Pittsfield branch of the Toledo, Wabash, and Western railroad pass through it.

The chief productions in 1870 were 1,057,627 bushels of wheat, 1,399,188 of Indian corn, 161,419 of oats, 54,736 of potatoes, 385,672 lbs. of butter, 71,638 of wool, and 17,216 tons of hay. There were 11,047 horses, 1,880 mules and asses, 7,657 milch cows, 12,315 other cattle, 18,688 sheep, and 51,433 swine; 18 manufactories of carriages and wagons, 15 of cooperage, 9 of saddlery and harness, 5 of tobacco, 3 of woollen goods, 14 flour mills, and 6 saw mills. Capital, Pittsfield.

X. An E. County Of Missouri

An E. County Of Missouri, separated from Illinois by the Mississippi river, intersected by Salt river, and drained by several creeks; area, about 700 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 23,076, of whom 4,195 were colored. It is intersected by the Chicago and Alton railroad. The chief productions in 1870 were 438,009 bushels of wheat, 699,-522 of Indian corn, 232,828 of oats, 28,357 of potatoes, 12,489 tons of hay, 632,552 lbs. of tobacco, 69,791 of wool, 253,545 of butter, 31,015 of honey,.and 11,418 gallons of sorghum molasses. There were 8,091 horses, 3,079 mules and asses, 5,760 milch cows, 11,224 other cattle, 22,608 sheep, and 30,062 swine; 12 manufactories of carriages and wagons, 3 of tobacco, 3 of woollen goods, 1 distillery, 1 iron foun-dery, 6 flour mills, 7 saw mills, and 3 planing mills. Capital, Bowling Green.