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Practical Cook Book | by Miss Suzanne Tracy



In presenting these pages to the public, I do so at the earnest solicitation of many of my pupils who would have in book form my recipes and suggestions. I therefore put into print this pamphlet of recipes where the formula is given, followed by the explicit directions of how to put together the ingredients: with such notes and hints as may be of value to the housewife. The directions are not theories, but the fruits of practical experience. The arrangement of the subject-matter is designed to make the book a household reference book that may be depended upon.

TitlePractical Cook Book
AuthorMiss Suzanne Tracy
PublisherPayot. Stratford & Kerr Print
Year1908
Copyright1908, Payot. Stratford & Kerr Print
AmazonPractical Cook Book
-Soups
There are two kinds of soup stock: what is known as clear stock and mixed stock. To make a clear soup we always use fresh meat and bone; the mixed stock being made from bones and pieces of meat left f...
-Soups. Continued
Vermicelli Soup Two quarts of beef stock, One teaspoonful of salt, Dash of cayenne pepper, One cupful of vermicelli, One-half saltspoonful of pepper. Cook the vermicelli in boiling water about fifte...
-Vegetable Soups
Tomato Soup One quart can of tomatoes, One tablespoonful of sugar, Four cloves, One tablespoonful of butter, One tablespoonful of minced onion, One tablespoonful of cornstarch, One tablespoonful of...
-Cream Soups
Cream Of Asparagus Save the water in which the asparagus has been cooked; make a cream sauce of two tablespoonfuls of butter; two tablespoonfuls of flour, two cupfuls of rich milk and one level tcasp...
-Fish
Fish should be perfectly fresh and thoroughly cooked. In buying, select only those which have firm flesh, clear eyes and the skin and scales bright. If the fish looks limp it is not fit to use. It sho...
-Fish. Continued
Codfish Balls One cupful raw codfish, Four medium-sized potatoes, One egg, One teaspoonful of butter, One-fourth saltspoonful of pepper. Wash, pare and cut the potatoes into quarters; let stand in ...
-Oysters
Oysters served on the half shell should be opened just before serving. Six, on a large plate, with half of a lime in the center, should be served to each person. Oyster Cocktail Two tablespoonfuls...
-Meats - Boiling
All fresh meats to be boiled should be plunged into boiling water and allowed to boil rapidly for ten or fifteen minutes, to coagulate the albumen and thus close the pores, keeping in the juices of th...
-Broiling Meat and Fish
Broiling is the most perfect way of cooking meat and fish. There are three ways of broiling, - what is known as broiling proper, pan broiling and oven broiling. Broiling proper is to broil directly o...
-Roasting
Roasting and baking are now synonymous terms. We speak of roasting meats and baking breads, yet we use the same oven for both. Roasting formerly meant to place the meat on a spit before the open fire,...
-Poultry And Game
To Draw Poultry All poultry should be dressed as soon as killed; the feathers come out more easily while the fowl is warm; strip them off toward the head; remove the pin-feathers with a knife; singe ...
-Frying
Prying is cooking in hot fat deep enough to entirely cover the articles to be cooked. When food is properly fried the fat is hot enough to instantly sear the outer surface and thus prevent it soaking ...
-Frying. Continued
Cheese Balls One and one-half cupfuls of grated cheese, One-fourth teaspoonfnl of salt, Dash of cayenne pepper, Whites of three eggs. Beat the eggs until stiff: add the salt, pepper and grated che...
-Croquettes
In making croquettes the material must be chopped fine, well mixed, and seasoned delicately. The shaping of croquettes can readily be acquired by a little practice and care. They are formed into cone,...
-Salads
Salads, to be palatable, should always be crisp and fresh and served icy cold. It is upon its crispness and the proper mingling and selection of ingredients that its success depends; when lettuce is t...
-Salads. Continued
Potato Salad Six medium-sized potatoes, Four tablespoonfuls of cooked mayonnaise, One tablespoonful of minced parsley, One tablespoonful of minced onion, One teaspoonful of dry mustard. Two teaspoon...
-Meat And Fish Sauces
White Sauce Cook together one tablespoonful of butter and one of flour; add one cupful of rich milk; stir until smooth; season with pepper and salt. Brown Sauce Cook one tablespoonful of butter u...
-Vegetables
All green vegetables must be cooked in freshly boiled salted water; allow one teaspoonful of salt for each quart of water. The younger the vegetable the more quickly it will cook. Boiled Rice Pick...
-Potatoes
Nearly every housekeeper fancies she can cook a potato, and yet we have so many soggy and poor-flavored potatoes brought to our tables. The potato is composed chiefly of starch and water. When subject...
-Bread
Vienna Bread Flour, One pint of wetting (half milk and water), One compressed yeast cake. One teaspoonful of salt. Dissolve the yeast in half a cupful of cold water; add the salt to the wetting, w...
-Bread. Continued
Shortcake One pint of flour, One-half teaspoonful of salt, One teaspoonful of baking powder. One egg, Two tablespoonfuls of butter. One-half cupful of milk. Sift the flour, salt and baking-powder...
-Bread Rolls
French Rolls Take a small piece of bread dough about four inches square; shape it into a ball; roll under the palms of the hands upon the bread board into a long roll about one inch in diameter; lay ...
-Eggs
Soft Boiled Eggs Put two eggs in a pint sauce pan; cover with boiling water; cover and let stand eight minutes. This method will cook both white and yolk. If you are cooking a large number of eggs, c...
-Pastry And Pies
Flaky Pastry One cupful of flour, One saltspoonful of salt, One-third cupful of shortening, One-fourth cupful of ice water. Have all the material cold; put the flour and salt into a chopping bowl; ...
-Puddings
English Plum Pudding One-half pound of stale bread crumbs, One cupful of hot milk. One-half cupful of sugar. Four eggs, One-half pound of raisins, One-half pound of currants. One-fourth pound of fi...
-Pudding Sauces
Golden Sauce One-third cupful of butter, One cupful of sugar (powdered). Yolks of two eggs, One-third cupful of milk. Grated rind of half an orange. Cream the butter; add the sugar and cream toge...
-Invalid Cookery
Beef Tea Buy the top of the round for beef tea; it contains the most nutriment and is the best flavored; remove every particle of fat; cut the meat into very fine pieces; add one pint of water to eac...
-Cake
Notes On Cake Making Have the bowl warm, the butter soft, sugar fine; use a wooden spoon for beating; never mix cake in tin; have pans perfectly clean; do not grease the pans; paper the bottom of the...
-Cake. Part 2
Fruit Cake One pound of butter, One dozen eggs, Five pounds of raisins, One cupful of molasses, One pint of brandy, One-half pint of wine, One pound of flour, One pound of sugar, One pound of citron...
-Cake. Part 3
Small Nut Cakes One pound of butter, One and one-half cupfuls of sugar. Four eggs, Wine glassful of brandy. Three cupfuls of flour, One and one-half teaspoonfuls of baking powder, English walnut...
-Delicate Desserts
Strawberry Pudding One-third of a box of gelatine, One-third of a cupful of cold water, One-third of a cupful of boiling water, One saltspoonful of salt. One and two-third cupfuls of strawberry juic...
-Sherberts And Ice Cream
Directions For Freezing Pour the mixture into the tin can; put the beater in and put on the cover; put the can into the tub and see that the point on the bottom of the can fits into the socket in the...
-Beverages
Coffee Mocha and Java coffee are supposed to make the best mixture. The best grade, however, should be bought. It should always be ground just before using and never bought ground, as it quickly lose...







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