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The Art Of Interior Decoration | by Grace Wood, Emily Burbank



If you would have your rooms interesting as well as beautiful, make them say something, give them a spinal column by keeping all ornamentation subservient to line. Before you buy anything, try to imagine how you want each room to look when completed; get the picture well in your mind, as a painter would; think out the main features, for the details all depend upon these and will quickly suggest themselves. This is, in the long run, the quickest and the most economical method of furnishing...

TitleThe Art Of Interior Decoration
AuthorGrace Wood, Emily Burbank
PublisherDodd, Mead And Company
Year1919
Copyright1916, Dodd, Mead And Company
AmazonThe Art of Interior Decoration

Illustrated

Dedicated To A. M. M. At the age of eighty, an inspiration to all who meet her, because she is the embodiment of what this book stands for; namely, fidelity to the principles of Clastic Art and watchfulness for the vital new note struck in the cause of the Beautiful.

-Foreword
If you would have your rooms interesting as well as beautiful, make them say something, give them a spinal column by keeping all ornamentation subservient to line. Before you buy anything, try to ima...
-Illustrations
There is something unusually exquisite about this composition. You will discover at a glance perfect balance, repose-line, everywhere, yet with it infinite grace and a winning charm. One can imagine a...
-Chapter I. How To Rearrange A Room
LUCKY is the man or woman of taste who has no inherited eye-sores which, because of association, must not be banished! When these exist in large numbers one thing only remains to be done: look them ov...
-How To Rearrange A Room. Continued
If it is necessary to economise and your brass bedstead must be used even though you dislike it, you can have it painted the colour of your walls* It requires a number of coats. A soft pearl grey is g...
-Chapter II. How To Create A Room
ONE so often hears the complaint, I could not possibly set out alone to furnish a room! I don't know anything about periods. Why, a Louis XVI chair and an Empire chair are quite the same to me. Then ...
-How To Create A Room. Part 2
Having settled upon a type of furniture, turn your attention to the walls. Always let the location of your room decide the colour of its walls. The room with a sunny exposure may have any colour you l...
-How To Create A Room. Part 3
A beautiful sitting-room, not to be forgotten, had light violet walls, dull-gold frames on the furniture which was covered in deep-cream brocades, bits of old purple velvets and violet silks on the ta...
-Chapter III. How To Determine Character Of Hangings And Furniture-Covering For A Given Room
IN a measure, the materials for hangings and furniture-coverings are determined more or less by the amount one wishes to spend in this direction. For choice, one would say silk or velvet for formal ro...
-Chapter IV. The Story Of Textiles
THE story of the evolution of textiles (any woven material) is fascinating, and like the history of every art, runs parallel with the history of culture and progress in the art of living, - physical, ...
-Chapter V. Candlesticks, Lamps, Fixtures For Gas And Electricity, And Shades
CANDLESTICKS, lamps, and fixtures for gas and electricity must accord with the lines of your architecture and furniture. The mantelpiece is the connecting link between the architecture and the furnish...
-Chapter VI. Window Shades And Awnings
THE first thing to consider in selecting window shades when furnishing a house, is whether their colour harmonises with the exterior. Keeping this point in mind, further limit your selection to those ...
-Chapter VII. Treatment Of Pictures And Picture Frames
STRIVE to have the subject of your pictures appropriate to the room in which they are to be hung. It is impossible to state a rule for this, however, because while there are many styles of pictures wh...
-Chapter IX. Treatment Of Dining-Room Buffets And Dressing-Tables
A DINING-ROOM buffet requires the same dignity of treatment demanded by a mantelpiece, whether the silver articles kept on it be of great or small intrinsic value. Here, as in every case, appropriaten...
-Chapter X. Treatment Of Work Tables, Bird Cages, Dog Baskets And Fish Globes
EVERY bedroom planned for a woman, young or old, calls for a work table, work basket or work bag, or all three, and these furnish opportunities for additional flowers in your room; for we insist upo...
-Chapter XII. Treatment Of Bathrooms
SUMPTUOUS bathrooms are not modern inventions, on the contrary the bath was a religion with the ancient Greeks, and a luxury to the early Italians, What we have to say here is in regard to the bath as...
-Chapter XIII. Period Rooms
WE use the term period rooms with full knowledge of the difficulties involved, in defining Louis XIV, Louis XV, Louis XVI, Directoire, Jacobean, Empire, Georgian, Victorian and Colonial decorations....
-Chapter XIV. Periods In Furniture
PERIODS in furniture are amazingly interesting if one plunges into the story, not with tense nerves, but gaily, for mere amusement, and then floats gently, in a drifting mood. One gathers in this way ...
-Chapter XVI. The Gothic Period
THE Gothic Period is the pointed period, and dominated the art of Europe from about the tenth to the fifteenth century. Its origin was Teutonic, its development and perfection French. At first, the h...
-Chapter XVII. The Renaissance
FOLLOWING the Gothic Period came the Renaissance of Greek art which began in Italy under the leadership of Leonardo Da Vinci and Raphael, who, rejecting the existing types of degraded decorative art, ...
-Chapter XVIII. French Furniture
THE classic periods in French furniture were those known as Francis I, Henry II and the three Louis, - XIV, XV, and XVI. One can get an idea of all French periods in furnishing by visiting the collect...
-Chapter XIX. The Periods Of The Three Louis
THE only way to learn how to distinguish the three Louis is to study these periods in collections of furniture and objects of art, or, where this is impossible, to go through books showing interiors o...
-Chapter XX. Charts Showing Historical Evolution Of Furniture
Louis XIV, 1643 to 1715-Key-note The Grand Audience Rooms Compressed regularity giving way in reaction to a pon- -derous ugliness. Straight square grooved and very squat cabriole legs...
-Chapter XXI. The Mahogany Period
IT is interesting to note that the Grea Fire of London started the importa tion of foreign woods from across the Baltic, as great quantities were needed at once for the purpose of rebuilding. These so...
-The Period Of William III And Queen
MARY AND EARLY GEORGIAN are characterised by turned work, giving way to flattened forms, and the disappearance of the elaborate front stretcher on Charles II chairs. The coming of mahogany into Engla...
-The Period Of William III And Queen. Continued
The American Revolutionary War stopped the exportation of furniture to America, with the result that cabinet-makers in the United States copied Chippendale and neglected all other later artists. When ...
-Chapter XXII. The Colonial Period
THE furniture made in America during the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries was reproduced from English models and shows the influence of Chippendale, Sheraton, Heppelwhite and the Adam brother...
-Chapter XXIII. The Revival Of Directoire And Empire Furniture
THE revival of Directoire and Empire furniture within the past few years, is attributed by some, to that highly artistic, and altogether illuminating publication, the Gazette du Bon Ton - Arts, Modes ...
-Chapter XXIV. The Victorian Period
GRADUALLY architecture and interior decoration drew apart, becoming two distinct professions, until during the Victorian era the two were unrelated with the result that the period of Victorian furnitu...
-Chapter XXV. Painted Furniture
PAINTED furniture is, at present, the vogue, so if you own a piece made by the Adam brothers of England, decorated by the hand of Angelica Kauffman, or Pergolesi, from Greek designs, now is the moment...
-Chapter XXVI. Treatment Of An Inexpensive Bedroom
THE experience of the author is that the most attractive, inexpensive furniture is that made by the Leavens factory in Boston. This furniture is so popular with all interior decorators that it needs n...
-Chapter XXVII. Treatment Of A Guest Room (Where Economy Is Not An Item Of Importance)
HERE we can indulge our tastes for beautiful quality of materials and fine workmanship, as well as good line and colour, so we describe a room which has elegant distinction and atmosphere, yet is not ...
-Chapter XXVIII. A Modern House In Which Genuine Jacobean Furniture Is Appropriately Set
IN original scheme for a dining-room was recently carried out in a country house in England by a woman whose hobby is illuminating. It will appeal to experts in the advance guard of interior decoratio...
-Chapter XXIX. Unconventional Breakfast-Rooms And Sports Balconies
SUN-rooms are now a feature of country and some town houses. One of the first we remember was in Madrid, at the home of Canovas del Castillo, Prime Minister during the Regency. Dejeuner used to be s...
-Chapter XXX. Sun-Rooms
THERE are countless fascinating schemes for arranging sun-rooms. One which we have recently seen near Philadelphia, was the result of enclosing a large piazza, projecting from an immense house situate...
-Chapter XXXI. Treatment Of A Woman's Dressing-Room
EVERY house, or flat, which is at all pretentious, should arrange a Vanity Room for the use of guests, in which there are full-length mirrors, a completely equipped dressing-table with every conceivab...
-Chapter XXXII. The Treatment Of Closets
THE modern architect turns out his closets so complete as to comfort and convenience, that he leaves but little to be done by the professional or amateur decorator. Each perfectly equipped bedroom sui...
-Chapter XXXIII. Treatment Of A Narrow Hall
A LONG, narrow hall in a house, or apartment, is difficult to arrange, but there are methods of treating them which partially corrects their defects. One method is shown on Plate XIV. The best furnis...
-Chapter XXXIV. Treatment Of A Very Shaded Living-Room
BY introducing plenty of yellow and orange you can bring sunshine into a dark living-room. If your house is in a part of the country where the heat is great, a dark living-room in summer is sometimes ...
-Chapter XXXV. Servants' Rooms
WHETHER you expect to arrange for one servant or a dozen, keep in mind the fact that efficiency is dependent upon the conditions under which your manor maid-servant rests as well as works, and that it...
-Chapter XXXVI. Table Decoration
FOR the young and inexperienced we state a few rules for table decoration. If you have furnished your dining-room to accord not only with your taste, but the scale upon which you intend living, be car...
-Chapter XXXVII. What To Avoid In Interior Decoration: Rules For Beginners
WE all know the saying that it is only those who have mastered the steps in dancing who can afford to forget them. It is the same in every art Therefore let us state at once, that all rules may be bro...
-Chapter XXXVIII. Fads In Collecting
IN a New York home one room is devoted to a so-called panier fleuri collection which in this case means that each article shows the design of a basket holding flowers or fruit. The collection is today...
-Chapter XXXIX. Wedgwood Pottery, Old And Modern
MANY of our museums have interesting collections of old Wedgwood. Altogether the most complete collection we have ever seen is in the museum adjoining the Wedgwood factories in Staffordshire, England....
-Chapter XL. Italian Pottery
ABOUT nine years ago, an American connoisseur, automobiling from Paris to Vienna, the route which lies through Northern Italy, quite by chance, happened to see some statuettes in the window of a hopef...
-Chapter XLI. Venetian Glass, Old And Modern
IF you have been in Venice then you know the Murano Museum and its beguiling collection of Venetian glass, that old glass so vastly more beautiful in line and decoration than the modern type of, say, ...
-In Conclusion
IN bringing our book to an end we would reiterate four fundamental principles of Interior Decoration (and all decoration) : Good lines. Correct proportions. Harmonious colour scheme (which includes...







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previous page: The Art Of Decoration | by H. R. Haweis
  
page up: Decoration Making Books
  
next page: Historic Ornament - Treatise On Decorative Art And Architectural Ornament | by James Ward