Henry , the name of ten counties in the United States. I. A S. county of Virginia, bordering on North Carolina, and drained by Smith's river, a tributary of the Dan; area, 358 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 12,303, of whom 5,581 were colored. It has a hilly surface. The chief productions in 1870 were 23,651 bushels of wheat, 154,794 of Indian corn, 75,-229 of oats, and 1,129,617 lbs. of tobacco. There were 865 horses, 536 mules and asses, 1,747 milch cows, 2,379 other cattle, 3,442 sheep, and 7,448 swine, and 4 tobacco factories. Capital, Martinsville. II. A N. W. central county of Georgia, bounded N. E. by South river, a branch of the Ocmulgee, and drained by several affluents of the latter stream; area, 594 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 10,102, of whom 3,833 were colored. The surface is diversified and well wooded, and the soil is of middling quality. Iron, quartz, and a small quantity of gold are found. The Macon and Western railroad passes through the W. part. The chief productions in 1870 were 45,488 bushels of wheat, 166,210 of Indian corn, 16,619 of oats, 22,714 of sweet potatoes, and 4,888 bales of cotton. There were 860 horses, 1,125 mules and asses, 1,897 milch cows, 2,903 other cattle, 3,525 sheep, and 7,648 swine.

Capital, McDonough. III. A S. E. county of Alabama, bounded S. by Florida, separated from Georgia on the E. by the Chattahoochee river, here navigable by steamboats, and drained by the east branch of the Choctawhatchee river; area, 975 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 14,191, of whom 4,657 were colored. It has a diversified surface, and a light, sandy, but very fertile soil, drained by many small streams, and in some parts overgrown with pine forests. The chief productions in 1870 were 248,470 bushels of Indian corn, 48,988 of sweet potatoes, and 7,127 bales of cotton. There were 1,240 horses, 1,061 mules and asses, 3,551 milch cows, 7,231 other cattle, 3,953 sheep, and 22,186 swine. Capital, Abbeville. IV. A N. W. county of Tennessee, bordering on Kentucky, bounded E. partly by Tennessee river and partly by the Big Sandy; area, 600 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 20,380, of whom 5,204 were colored. The surface is level and the soil rich. The Louisville and Nashville and Great Southern railroad traverses the county, and the Nashville and Northwestern line passes near the S. W. corner. The chief productions in 1870 were 98,435 bushels of wheat, 767,220 of Indian corn, 26,816 of oats, 31,882 of sweet potatoes, 1,715,001 lbs. of tobacco, 16,459 of wool, 174,000 of butter, and 2,385 bales of cotton.

There were 3,658 horses, 2,722 mules and asses, 3,600 milch cows, 4,631 other cattle, 10,878 sheep, and 34,384 swine; 8 manufactories of carriages, 2 of cotton goods, 6 of tobacco, 6 wool-carding and cloth-dressing establishments, and 7 saw mills. Capital, Paris. V. A N. county of Kentucky, bounded N. E. by the Kentucky river, which is here navigable by steamboats; area, 260 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 11,066, of whom 2,438 were colored. It has an undulating surface, partly covered with forests, and a fertile soil of limestone formation. The Louisville, Cincinnati, and Lexington railroad passes through it. Drennon Springs, on the Kentucky river, is noted as a fashionable resort. The chief productions in 1870 were 57,123 bushels of wheat, 25,516 of rye, 591,528 of Indian corn, 63,913 of oats, 1,375,-364 lbs. of tobacco, 26,501 of wool, 114,160 of butter, and 2,879 tons of hay. There were 3,595 horses, 2,376 milch cows, 4,203 other cattle, 6,389 sheep, and 19,080 swine; 2 flour mills, 2 saw mills, and 1 woollen factory. Capital, Newcastle. VI. A N. W. county of Ohio, traversed by Maumee river and drained by several of its branches; area, 410 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 14,028. It has a level surface and a rich soil.

The Wabash and Erie canal, and the Toledo, Wabash, and Western, and the Dayton and Michigan railroads pass through it. The chief productions in 1870 were 175,-151 bushels of wheat, 145,522 of Indian corn, 78,190 of oats, 67,347 of potatoes, 80,482 lbs. of wool, 297,973 of butter, and 11,311 tons of •ha)'. There were 3,764 horses, 3,958 milch cows, 4,735 other cattle, 14,692 sheep, and 9,359 swine; 4 manufactories of carriages, 4 of tin, copper, and sheet-iron ware, 1 of woollen goods, 2 flour mills, and 25 saw mills. Capital, Napoleon. VII. An E. county of Indiana, having a level or rolling surface, originally covered with dense forests; area, 385 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 22,986. The soil is fertile and watered by several small streams. The Pittsburgh, Cincinnati, and St. Louis, and the Fort Wayne, Muncie, and Cincinnati railroads traverse it. The chief productions in 1870 were 610,721 bushels of wheat, 1,152,164 of Indian corn, 98,677 of oats, 52,599 of potatoes, 64,953 lbs. of wool, 384,481 of butter, and 10,000 tons of hay.

There were 6,894 horses, 4,985 milch cows, 9,385 other cattle, 17,089 sheep, and 33,847 swine; 18 manufactories of carriages, 6 of barrels and casks, 4 of bricks, 12 of saddlery and harness, 2 of sash, doors, and blinds, 5 of tin, copper, and sheet-iron ware, 4 of woollen goods, 11 flour mills, and 17 saw mills. Capital, Newcastle. VIII. A N. W. county of Illinois, bounded N. W. by Rock river, and drained also by its affluents, Green and Edwards rivers; area, 830 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 35,413. It has an undulating surface, diversified with forests and fertile prairies, and contains good building stone and coal. The Chicago, Burlington, and Quincy railroad and the Galva and Keithsburg branch, the Chicago, Rock Island, and Pacific, and the Peoria and Rock Island railroads traverse it. The chief productions in 1870 were 462,824 bushels of wheat, 35,766 of rve, 2,541,683 of Indian corn, 668,367 of oats, 65,760 of barley, 156,734 of potatoes, 40,991 lbs. of wool, 644,494 of butter, and 37,229 tons of hay.

There were 11,-960 horses, 8,872 milch cows, 15,780 other cattle, 6,266 sheep, and 34,843 swine; 11 manufactories of carriages, 2 of barrels and casks, 5 of furniture, 13 of saddlery and harness, 1 of sash, doors, and blinds, 2 of soap and candles, 6 of tin, copper, and sheet-iron ware, 1 brewery, and 5 flour mills. Capital, Cambridge. IX. A S. E. county of Iowa, traversed by Skunk river, an affluent of the Mississippi; area, 432 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 21,463. The surface is undulating and diversified by prairies and timber land. Coal and limestone are abundant, and the soil is of excellent quality. The Burlington and Missouri River railroad passes through it. The chief productions in 1870 were 219,474 bushels of wheat, 1,095,846 of Indian corn, 231,631 of oats, 99,459 of potatoes, 129,187 lbs. of wool, 490,181 of butter, and 27,991 tons of hay. There were 9,400 horses, 7,003 milch cows, 11,214 other cattle, 30,805 sheep, and 30.855 swine; 2 manufactories of agricultural implements, 2 of boots and shoes, 19 of carriages, 4 of furniture, 7 of saddlery and harness, 6 of tin, copper, and sheet-iron ware, 1 of woollen goods, 1 tannery, 8 flour mills, and 6 saw mills.

Capital, Mount Pleasant. X. A W. central county of Missouri, drained by Grand river, an affluent of the Osage; area, 750 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 17,401, of whom 642 were colored. It has a diversified surface, abounds in coal, timber, and water power, is mostly fertile, and is well adapted to stock raising. The chief productions in 1870 were 239,828 bushels of wheat, 1,167,590 of Indian corn, 298,581 of oats, 34,-117 of potatoes, 181,945 lbs. of butter, and 5,167 tons of hay. There were 7,066 horses, 1,256 mules and asses, 5,262 milch cows, 12,-157 other cattle, 12,162 sheep, and 27,252 swine; 2 manufactories of bricks, 6 of carriages, 5 of saddlery and harness, 2 of tin, copper, and sheet-iron ware, 2 of woollen goods, and 9 flour mills. Capital, Clinton.

Henry #1

Henry , the name of several sovereigns of England, France, and Germany.