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A Bachelor's Cupboard | by John W. Luce



Being a bachelor is easy. Staying a bachelor - ah! there's the hitch! But that's another story. Yes, it's easy to be a bachelor, but to be a thoroughbred, unless it is inbred and the single man is " to the manner born," is more difficult. It requires unlimited time, patience and education as well as a store of myriad bits of information on a multitude of subjects.

TitleA Bachelor's Cupboard
AuthorJohn W. Luce
PublisherC. H. Simonds & Co. Boston, U. S. A.
Year1906
Copyright1906 By John W. Luce
A-Bachelor-s-Cupboard-1

Copyright, 1906 By John W. Luce & Co.

Entered at Stationers' Hall

(Colonial Press

Electrotyped and Printed by C. H. Simonds & Co. Boston, U. S. A.

A-Bachelor-s-Cupboard-2

To the sale survivor of "The Five Bachelors Of " The Shack," I affectionately dedicate this Book.

-Preface
Alh! drink if you will to the handsome man, Or the proud athlete undaunted. And toast him, too, the husband true, Whose faith has long been vaunted. And drink to the strong and h...
-Chapter I. On Being a Bachelor
The correct bachelor must not only know how, but he must know why. He must be a woman's man and a man's man, an all-round good fellow. He must ''fit everywhere and adap...
-Chapter II. The Impecunious Bachelor
Possibly it may be the invasion of woman into all the trades and professions of men that accounts for this dollarless portion of many young men. Where once they reigned supreme, they are ...
-Chapter III. Stocking the Cupboard
The Fate of Nations Depends upon How They Are Fed. - Brillat-Savarin. In stocking the cupboard there is much to be considered: whether the bachelor sports his own menage w...
-The Service
For ordinary use, he may follow his own taste in china; but it is well to expend a trifle more in getting something that is artistic, and will always be in good taste. Willow ware is always in perfect...
-Cooking
FOR THE utensils and articles de cuisine, the following list will be found to embrace all the things needed for a very small menage: I covered agate kettle ...
-The Supplies
Now for the supplies which he must keep on hand. This list includes, beside the necessities in one column, the luxuries in the other. These bought, he may bargain for his milk and cream to be left at ...
-Chapter IV. Bachelor Etiquette
Manners are of more importance than laws. - Burke. What is a gentleman? a young debutante naively asked of her uncle, a club man and gentleman...
-Chapter V. Around the Camp Fire
Life in camp, from the Atlantic to the Pacific, in the mountains and by the sea or inland lakes and rivers, has a peculiar charm, not the least of which is found in the camp cooker...
-Broiled Birds
BROILED birds are split and cleaned, wiped dry, and broiled either on a wire broiler or forked stick over the clear coals, from a wood fire. Ten or fifteen minutes is genera...
-Chapter VI. Carving and Game
A man hath often more trouble to get food than to digest it. Who has said that the carving knife is mightier than the sword? But in spite of that ...
-Chapter VII. Snacks of Sea Food
With such cooking, a monkey might eat his own father. ESCABECHE Don't ask me what that means - I won't tell. But try it for your fish course some time, when the mer...
-Lobsters With Mushrooms
It was a benedict from New Orleans who first told me about lobster with mushrooms. He was a hopeless bachelor when a girl who initiated him into the mysteries of this luscious bonne bouchée promised t...
-An Oyster Specialty
A young pathologist, whose name is equally well known in Boston and Berlin, is quite as devoted to his chafing dish as he is to his laboratory, and he has generally something quite recherche to offer ...
-OYSTER TOAST a la Sir John Bayley
Bruise one small anchovy fine and take two dozen oysters and cast off their beards. Chop the oysters fine with a silver knife and put with the anchovy in the chafing dish. Mix both together with su...
-Chapter VIII. A Chat on Cheese
Cheese is but a peevish elf It digests all except itself. Cheese is one of the most valuable of foods, and contains, in one pound, as much nutriment as is containe...
-Fromage A La Florian Robert.
A Gruyère cheese appetizer is a favorite with the students of Geneva and Lausanne. Florian Robert brought the recipe into his coterie at the Sorbonne, and in the little apartment on the Boul' Miche...
-Fondue Au Fromage.
A delicate fondue au fromage may be quickly made - of the sort that one serves with ginger ale or Apollinaris lemonade. Melt with a piece of butter the size of two chestnuts (I'm tired of saying "...
-Queen Victoria's Toasted Cheese
Would not a recipe from Victoria the Good be acceptable to the loyal John Bull? Then let it be toasted cheese from the Royal Lodge at Windsor, which is done in this fashion: ...
-Onion Rabbit
I have no time to waste in the idle discussion of whether it's Rarebit or Rabbit. If you must know, consult the Encyclopaedia Brittanica while two large Spanish onions are boiling in the hot water pan...
-Fried Onions With Cheese
These odorous but wholesome vegetables take on a new savor when friend in this fashion : Fry a quarter-pound or salt pork until quite brown, then remove from the pan. Slice a quart of onions into the ...
-Oyster Rabbit
A deviation from the time-worn rabbit is an Oyster Rabbit a la Frank Harris, which cannot fail to tickle some palates. Clean and remove the hard muscles from half a pint of oysters and let them hea...
-A Bedspread For Two
Herman Oelrichs occasionally created a bonne bouchée and this, which he called his bedspread for two, is another oyster concoction that is worthy of the name. Stir six eggs to...
-Sardine Rabbit.
Will you brave insomnia and indigestion? Then listen: Have some sardines broiled and placed on squares of buttered toast, then make in the chafer a thin rabbit, using milk in lieu of ale, and a dash...
-Chilely
A gay bachelor from 'Frisco who is too modest to give his name taught me this trick with cheese - New York Dairy. Break in pieces a quarter-pound of it and rub to a paste with a tablespoonful of butte...
-Chapter IX. Devils and Grills
One Devil Drives out Another Deviling is a particular form of cookery that was doubtless devised by some inventive bachelor; at all events, devils ' are ...
-Chapter X. Mexican and Creole Cooking
New dishes beget new appetites. San Francisco was a city of restaurants - the most wonderful restaurants in all America. With the passing of the old city one shudders t...
-Potatoes O'Brien
A half cup of lard is put in the frying pan with some sliced onion and a strip of bacon to give the proper flavor. Then some raw potatoes are sliced and cut across very thin, and three or four pieces ...
-Salade De Pimientos Morrones
This shall be the salad. With the heady Mexican wine - be sure you do not drink too much - and the clear strong coffee to come after, you will have a feast that should live in your recollection man...
-Chapter XI. Bachelor Bonnes Bouchées
Every animal but one keeps to one dish.The Spectator. Every bachelor is an epicure - or thinks he is. According to time and season and environment, the single ...
-The Omelette Espanol
The Omelette Espanol is built as follows: from a tablespoonful of butter and a tablespoonful or brown flour braided in a frying-pan or blazer, make a sauce by stirring in a cup of canned tomato, half...
-Scrambled Eggs And Cheese.
Raymond Hitchcock transforms himself in the twinkling of an eye from a Yankee Consul into a maître d'hôtel, and his scrambled eggs and cheese deserve a place in the galaxy of stars recipe...
-Pommes Castellane.
It is possible that Counte Boni de Castellane invented the potato which bears his name; if he did, he ought to have proper credit, for it is a mouthful that is certainly deserving of more than mild pr...
-Quails A La Marquis De Massa
The Marquis de Massa really does invent dishes. Recently he gave to the world a delicious morsel in a piquant dish of quails that he has wished to bear the name of a Capus. The quails are poach...
-Sambayon A La Milanaise
Although sweets have not a large place on bachelor menus, there is one - a Milanaise delicacy which raises the entire meal from the dead level of the usual Italian table d'hote, and, as prepared by Ca...
-Norwegian Buttered Eggs
Superintending the building of an irrigation ditch in the Big Horn Basin of Wyoming has been a young Norwegian civil engineer, one O. J. Midthun by name, and Mid for short. Mid...
-A Sublime Sandwich
Out in the Canadian Rockies, not many miles from Banff the Beautiful, there is a member of the Northwestern Mounted Police force, the scion of a titled English family, with a house in Belgravia and a ...
-Salade A La Dumas.
Salad is the one thing on the menu that should be considered a penal offence if improperly served. This salad was devised by Alexandre Dumas, and it has become famous throughout two continents: ...
-Kidneys And Mushrooms
How would kidneys and mushrooms go with a bottle of Dog's Head for a little snack after the play? Have ready six lamb's kidneys, halved and skinned. Half a can of French button mushrooms will also ...
-Chapter XII. Concerning Condiments
Good living is due to that action of the judgment by which things that please our taste are preferable to all others.' - SavaRIN. In the Bachelor's Cupboard there are many c...
-Concerning Condiments: A-B
ANCHOVY ESSENCE. A British firm practically controls the world's market in the manufacture of anchovy essence, which is made from a little sea fish caught in the Mediterranean. It can be bought for us...
-Concerning Condiments: C-E
CAPERS Pickled green berries from a shrub, an old-time relish to eat with mutton. Caper sauce is made from butter sauce mixed with capers and the caper vinegar. Capers are used as well in certain sala...
-Concerning Condiments: F-H
FINANCIERE GARNISH consists of brown sauce with sherry, cocks' combs, livers, pieces of sweetbreads, etc. FRENCH DRESSING is an indefinite name for a variety of salad dressings, but...
-Concerning Condiments: M-N
MACÉDOINE VEGETABLES A French product used for soups, salads, and garnishing planked steaks. They come in glass, with carrots, turnips, string beans, peas, and green beans, a delightful melange...
-Concerning Condiments: O-P
OIL is one of the most important of condiments, and used by the Latin races in their cookery in preference to butter. Olive oil is obtained by crushing and pressing the olives in sacks, a...
-Concerning Condiments: S-W
SAGE is the best herb flavoring for pork, sausage, goose, and tame duck. Can be bought in pressed packages or ground in tins. SAVORY is another soup herb that comes in two varieties - sum...
-Chapter XIII. Variations with Vegetables
He that waits upon fortune is never sure of a dinner. At times there seems to be a craving for vegetables that is irresistible. Possibly the hungry bachelor may h...
-Broiled Tomatoes.
Does it seem possible that the luscious tomato was ever considered poisonous and that sure death awaited the eater? A fact it is, though, but most of us would prefer to think of this vegetable as the ...
-Peas A La Boudet.
This shall be the name for a dish of peas, for at the little Cafe Boudet on the corner of the Boulevard Raspail and the Rue Leopold Robert, in Paris, is a quaint little cafe with a cuisine bour...
-Creamed Mushrooms.
A small can of French mushrooms, which may be bought for fifteen or twenty cents, makes from four to six portions of creamed mushrooms. Happy be the bachelor who is an authority on Mycology; he may go...
-Mashed Brown Potatoes.
Shall these accompany the grilled steak? Put then in the blazer two tablespoonfuls of butter and one of flour, salt and pepper. Mix well and turn in sufficient cold boiled potatoes chopped fine for th...
-Brussels Sprouts.
Suppose you are entertaining an English-man and want to give him something homey. If you are perchance deviling slices of rare roast beef in one chafer, then give him some Brussels sprouts...
-Asparagus.
Shall it be canned asparagus tips or asparagus on toast ? Either is an excellent chafingdish dainty that is improved vastly by a cup of thin cream in the cooking. Have the asparagus heated, with possi...
-Asparagus Froid.
In Pliny's time, when asparagus grew wild, it may not have been considered as great a delicacy as now; and one does not learn of the variations of serving that it was treated to then; but now, in the ...
-Cucumbers Saute.
Don't tell me that you never fried cucumbers; if you haven't, it's quite time you learned. Put in the blazer a tablespoonful of butter, and slice your cucumbers, nicely peeled, into quarter-inch ...
-Chapter XIV. A Dissertation on Drinks
They that love mirth. Let them heartily drink ; 'Tis the only receipt To make sorrow sink. Ben Jonson. Why do men drink? To quench thirst? To drown sorrow...
-Absinthe Cocktail.
Into a goblet of shaved ice put two dashes of maraschino, one dash of orange bitters, and one pony of absinthe. Stir well, strain, and serve. The fish lead a pleasant life - they drink whe...
-Sir Walter Raleigh Recipe For Sack Possett
Heat a half-pint of ale and a half-pint of sherry, add one quart of boiling milk, sugar to taste, and some grated nutmeg. It should stand in a warm place for an hour, and just before se...
-Lamb's Wool
Heat a pint of good ale, add sugar and nutmeg to taste, then lemon peel and a pinch of cloves and ginger. Put in a bowl with three roasted apples sliced and three pieces of toast. Serve very hot. I...
-Scotch Hot Pint.
Mix with one well-beaten egg two table-spoonfuls of ale, some nutmeg, and onefourth pint of Scotch whisky. Stir in two pints of boiling-hot ale and add sugar to taste. Pour from one pitcher into an...
-Brown Betty An Oxford Drink
Melt one pound of sugar in one pint of water; add while boiling a pinch of pounded cloves, a dash of cinnamon, one-half pint of brandy, and one quart of good ale. Add a little ginger and nutmeg, and s...
-American Punch.
Rub the peel of six lemons on one pound of loaf sugar; squeeze their juice and that of six oranges on it, carefully removing the seeds, add four pounds of loaf sugar, five cloves, and two quarts of wa...
-Brain Duster
Squeeze into a tumbler the juice of a lime and add two dashes of gum, a pony of absinthe, two dashes of vino vermouth, and two dashes of sherry. Fill up with ice, stir, strain, and serve. ...
-Champagne Cobbler
This is a ladylike beverage, indeed. To make it, put a large lump of sugar in a wineglass nearly filled with shaved ice, and fill the intervals with champagne. Stir slowly, adding a little vanilla or ...
-Chatham Artillery Punch
One bottle of Catawba wine, one and a quarter bottles rum, the same quantity of whisky, one and a half pineapples, and sufficient strawberries to flavor and color. Allow liquid to stand under seal ove...
-Champagne Cup
Mix one bottle of champagne, two bottles of soda, a glass of brandy, a glass of Curacao, some slices of cucumber peel, and the juice of a lemon. Moselle or Sauterne may be made into cups the same way,...
-Cider Bowl
This is a favorite English beverage. Make an extract of a spoonful of green tea in a half-pint of boiling water, and after letting it stand a quarter-hour, put in a punch bowl and add six ounces of...
-Claret Cup
Into a punch bowl put half a pony each of benedictine, yellow chartreuse, maraschino, and Curacao, the juice of six limes, two bottles of claret, one bottle of Moselle, one bottle of ApolA Disse...
-Club Cocktail
Half a glassful of ice, two dashes of gum, two-thirds of gin, one-third of vino vermouth, two dashes of orange bitters, and one dash of green chartreuse. Stir well, strain, and serve. &quo...
-Coffee And Rum
Break an egg into a glass and beat it well; add a spoonful of sugar and a wineglassful of rum. Mix this up well, pour into a cup of the best Mocha coffee - hot - and add a small piece of butter....
-Earthquake Calmer
In a medium wineglass put one-third each of benedictine, brandy, and Curacao, and three dashes of Angostura. Conviviality reveals secrets. EGG NOGG Beat in a bowl the yolks ...
-English Punch
Rub the rind of two lemons on half a pound of sugar and put in the punch bowl, squeezing the juice over it with a quart of boiling water. Stir well; add three gills of rum and half a pint of brandy; g...
-English Milk Punch.
Rub the peel of three lemons on one pound of sugar and put in a bowl; squeeze the juice of the lemons over, and grate half a nutmeg and add with a bottle of rum. Mix thoroughly and let stand over nigh...
-Hollands Cocktail
Into a goblet put some shaved ice, two dashes of gum, one of absinthe, two dashes orange bitters, and a little Hollands. Strain and serve. When Bacchus pokes the fire, Venus sits by t...
-Spiced Claret
Here's a hot drink for a zero night. Have half a dozen lumps of sugar, four whole allspice, two whole cloves, the juice of half a lemon, and half a teaspoonful of ground cinnamon in a saucer. Mix well...
-Danforth Appetizer
Into a cocktail glass squeeze the juice of quarter of an orange, add a wineglassful of French vermouth and fill up with seltzer. A good change for an avant diner from the traditional cocktail. ...
-Wassail
This is a famous old English Christmastide recipe, and dates back to the time of good Queen Bess - and earlier. To a pint of ale add one-half ounce of grated ginger, one-half ounce of grated nutmeg, a...
-Imperial Punch
Peel one pineapple and four oranges; cut the first in small slices and separate the oranges into pieces, putting all in a punch bowl. Then boil in a quart of water two sticks of cinnamon and a stick o...
-Mint Julep
Dampen a small bunch of mint, dust with powdered sugar, bruising slightly, and pour over a little boiling water. Allow this to draw, then strain into tall glasses quite filled with finely-shaved ice. ...
-Shandy Gaff
Mix equal parts of ginger ale and Bass's Pale Ale. A temperate libation approved of by the very youthful Londoners. Claret for boys, port for men, and brandy for heroes. ...
-Sherry Cobbler
Into a large glass put a spoonful of sugar, a dash of White Rock, a wineglassful of sherry, and a dash of port. Fill up with fine ice, ornament with fruits in season, and top off with a spoonful of ic...
-The Only One
Put in a tall goblet some shaved ice, two dashes of gum, half a pony of crème de menthe, a pony of gin, and a dash of orange bitters. Squeeze into it the juice of a lemon-peel, stir wel...
-Stout Punch
Boil a quart of stout with a quarter-pound of lump sugar and a stick of cinnamon; beat four eggs to a foam and mix with a wineglassful of rum; take the stout from the fire and add, while continually s...
-Appetizer Of Angelo
Two lumps of ice, one-third vino vermouth (Italian), one-third of Fernet branca, and a slice of orange. This is served at the North End cafe of Angelo, in Boston, and is the favorite Italian ape...
-An Immortal Sour
Into a goblet put the juice of a lime, a little seltzer, and a spoonful of sugar, half of apple-jack, half of peach brandy, and the white of an egg. Fill up with ice, strain and serve. ' In...
-Whisky Cocktail
Into half a glassful of shaved ice squeeze a little lemon peel, to which add three dashes of gum, two dashes of bitters, one dash of absinthe, and a small glass of whisky. For whisky sling, put into a...
-Royal Shandy Gaff
Mix champagne and brandy, a quart of the former to a pint of the latter. Another recipe calls for a third the amount of brandy, and lest it be too strong one should experiment until he has it exactly ...
-Mississippi Punch
One glass of brandy, half glass Jamaica rum, and a tablespoonful of whisky, quarter of a lemon, and a tablespoonful of powdered sugar, and water to taste. Mix well and ice with shaved ice. For ...
-Chapter XV. What to Pay for Wines
The cost of wines is an important factor in entertaining. Many a man is forced to entertain friends of expensive tastes on the proverbial champagne taste and beer income "...
-Kirchenwasser
Kirchenwasser is made from the wild black cherry of the Black Forest. The seductive Forbidden Fruit is nothing more than grape-fruit cordial, while Curacao gains its taste from orange pee...
-The Judge's Stand
The judging of wines is an important part of every bachelor's education. To judge properly is as fine an art as painting a picture or composing a poem. The connoisseur des vins should be able...
-More Wise Cousel
Syphon bottles are as difficult to handle as women. You never know when they're going to change their tactics. An innocent-looking syphon has been known to explode at a sudden change in tempera...
-Chapter XVI. Correct Wines for all Occasions
Good liquor, I stoutly maintain, gives genius a better discerning.- Goldsmith. Almost every bachelor is capable of ordering a dream of a dinner - but how many are connoisseu...
-Entree Ou Removes
Claret, such as Si. Julien or Medoc, Chianti, or one of the minor Chateau brands, as Chateau Lafltte, are the proper accompaniment to the entree course. GAME With the game, Burgundy (...
-On Serving Beer
How often does a man hasten to put beer on ice when a friend drops in of an evening? Yet this is contrary to custom in the Old World, where one frequently sees the Germ...
-Wines
If three wines are wanted by the party of the first part, let the sherry and Burgundy be followed by a good, dry champagne. For sake of variety, Madeira might be substituted for the Bu...
-Champagnes
Champagnes - king's wine - are of several varieties : the still or non-mousseux, the effervescing or mousseux, and the grand-Mousseux or highly effe...
-Chapter XVII. Temperance Drinks
There are many occasions upon which one does not wish to offer alcoholic drinks, out of respect to guests who do not indulge in them -or possibly because the host may himself abs...
-Soda Cocktail
This is a most innocent drink, despite its name, and one that a two-year-old may not hesitate to imbibe. Fill up a long glass, then, with lemon soda, the bottled variety, and in it dash a ...
-Lemonade
Pooh! I hear you say in disgust. As if any man couldn't make lemonade without being told. But as this book may fall into the hands of a Hottentot or Malay or some other hot-...
-Chapter XVIII. Correct Clothes
Costly thy habit as thy purse can buy. But not expressed in fancy; rich, not gaudy; For the apparel oft claims a man. - Shakespeare. Once it &qu...
-Mourning For Men
A man wears mourning for a parent, sister, or brother for six months or a year, as he prefers. The crape hatband is adopted for this dress, but should be much narrower than that of a widower. First mo...
-The Tuxedo
The Tuxedo coat is no longer used as a dinner coat except at a stag dinner, at a club or hotel, or at an informal at-home dinner when only the members of one's family attend, or ...
-Chapter XIX. How a Man May Valet Himself
The first thing a poor gentleman calls for of a morning is a needle and thread. - Scotch His lordship finds the valet de chambre a necessary evil. ...
-Cleaning Ties
With many a man the tyranny of ties is so great as to be all-absorbing. Some men hang their ties and stocks on the nickel rods that come for the purpose all ready to screw inside the...
-To Renew Velvet Collar
Often an overcoat, that is otherwise in A good condition, is rendered unsightly and shabby by its collar. If it be crushed badly and wrinkled, heat the flatiron, and put bottomside up on the...
-To Clean White Gloves
Put the gloves on. Have in a saucer some gasolene and wash your gloved hands in this, after which take a clean flannel rag and wipe and rub the gloves, taking care not to do this near a ...
-Putting Away Winter Clothing
When packing away flannels and heavy winter clothing, camphor gum wrapped in pieces of tissue paper put among the goods is warranted to keep away moths. No soiled clothing should be put a...
-To Clean A Coat
Purchase from a druggist some soap-bark, and in the proportion of an ounce of bark to a quart of water steep the bark and let it stand over night. Then strain and add an equal amount of gasolene. Rub ...
-To Remove Gloss From A Coat
Many a good coat has been discarded because of the persistent shine on collar, from leaning against a chair or on elbows. Make a saturated solution of powdered borax and water, and apply to shiny plac...
-To Renew Silk Mufflers
Sponge on the wrong side with cool water and press with a warm iron until smooth. This should make the silk stirrer and brighter. While every man, however anxious he may be to valet ...
-Chapter XX. How to Cleanse Clothes
Everything is worse for wearing. It is not only the impecunious bachelor who is reduced to cleansing his own clothing. Emergencies are quite likely to arise at any time, in ...
-To Remove Wheel Or Machine Grease
In these motor-mad days, what bachelor has not suffered at some time from machine grease and oil, while wrestling with a stalled motor or choked carburetor? To remove this, or wheel ...
-To Remove Grease From Carpets
Put powdered French chalk thickly over the grease spot. Cover with a sheet of brown paper and then set smoothly on the paper, a hot flat iron and let remain until cool, when it will be found that ...
-Cleaning Mixture
This cleaning mixture may be put up by any druggist, if a man wishes to keep on hand something a bit stronger than any of the above mentioned. One-half ounce of glycerine, one-half ounce of sulphuric ...
-Ink Stains
An overturned ink well is a frequent mishap even in the best regulated bachelor apartments, and nothing causes his lordship so much consternation as to see the inky fluid trickling over his papers and...
-Indelible Ink
One would suppose that stains from indelible ink could not be removed, but they are by no means hopeless. A saturated solution of cyanuret of potassium and water will remove such stains. Apply care...
-Inky Fingers
The toiler over the ledger is often annoyed by inky fingers, and if he does not keep in the office lavatory a piece of pumice stone or hand sapolio, he may remove all traces of his trade by simply moi...
-Chapter XXI. Handy Hints on Housekeeping
Expect not at another's hand what you can do by your own. ...
-Airing The Bed
A woman who, as the mother of several sons, has many young men as guests at her large country house, says she can invariably judge a man from the care he takes of his room. A young man who has been we...
-To Clean Brushes
Hair brushes and clothes brushes need constant care to keep them in proper condition. Comb the loose hair and dust from them every time they are used. Once a week is not too often to clean the brushes...
-To Brighten Brass
Take putty powder and add to it sufficient sweet oil to make a paste. Rub with this the brass or copper until all foreign matter is removed. Then wash the article with soap and water and rub dry with ...
-To Brighten Nickel
Scour with powdered borax and a damp rag, rinsing off with clear water. If discolored, make a paste of equal parts of ammonia and alcohol and enough whiting to make thin, applying with a piece ...
-To Keep Silver
Silver flasks and other articles may be kept bright by wrapping from the air, in blue tissue paper. Never place near rubber, which quickly discolors it. A rubber band or a sulphur match wi...
-Chiffonier Or Bureau Drawers
Chiffonier Or Bureau Drawers that stick or creak when opened are an annoyance to anyone, especially if he is hurried. This may be easily avoided by rubbing the edges of the dra...
-A Few Hints On Hanging Pictures
Pictures should never be hung so high that it becomes necessary to mount a chair in order to see them. Hang so the center will be on a level with the line of vision of the person of average height, or...







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