The Mexican idea of the first meal in the morning is a cup of coffee and a small loaf of bread or biscuit. The guest may have that in his room if he likes, and he can have it supplemented with a beefsteak or eggs. At twelve o'clock dinner - la comida is ready. A bill of fare, just as brought from the table of the Jardin, is subjoined in Mexican and translation:

Menu De La Comida

Sopas.

A la Romana.

Arros.

Entradas.

Huevos al gusto.

Huachinango a la Matellot.

Beefsteak o'costillas.

Japonesas de salmi.

Salchichas conchiharos.

Fernerita con salpicon.

Chiles rellonos.

Asados.

Roastbeef.

Legumbres.

Califlores.

Papas al vapor.

Frijoles.

Pastres.

Fresas - helado.

Cafe, tee.

Dinner Bill Of Fare

Soups.

A la Romada.

Rice.

Entrees.

Eggs in all styles.

Red snapper a la Matellot.

Beefsteak or mutton chops.

Chicken croquettes.

Sausages with green peas.

Roast veal.

Stuffed chillies.

Roasts.

Roast beef.

Vegetables.

Cauliflower.

Boiled potatoes.

Beans.

Dessert.

Strawberries - ice cream.

Coffee, tea.

This meal is $1. The dishes are served one at a time. A foreigner may be a little surprised at first to find eggs elevated to such an important position in the bill of fare - they follow the soup - but he speedily discovers that Mexican eggs are always fresh, and he takes his "huevos" boiled, fried, or in omelet as regularly as the dinner comes round. The Mexican cooks have learned that there can be an excess of pepper to some tastes, and they serve "con chile" or without it as desired, the fiery sauce being provided in a bowl instead of being poured over the eggs or meat before leaving the kitchen. This is a great deal better than the old way, for a stranger can learn to like the chilli a good deal better if he takes it in homoepathic doses, instead of burning his throat out in ignorance the first time of sitting down to a Mexican meal.