Lincoln, the name of 1G counties in the United States.

I. A S. County Of Maine

I. A S. County Of Maine, bounded S. by the Atlantic and W. in part by the Kennebec, and drained by Sheepscott, Da-mariscotta, and Musconegus rivers; area, about 700 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 25,597. The soil is productive, but the inhabitants are mainly engaged in navigation and fisheries. It has many line harbors. The Knox and Lincoln railroad passes through it. The chief productions in 1870 were 4,702 bushels of wheat, 28,255 of Indian corn, 21,766 of oats, 48,175 of barley, 241,625 of potatoes, 11,485 of peas and beans, 48,820 lbs. of wool, 537,885 of butter, and 44,-185 tons of hay. There were 2,260 horses, 6,136 milch cows, 3,656 working oxen, 6,469 other cattle, 13,936 sheep, and 1,437 swine; 32 manufactories of brick, 47 of cooperage, 2 of machinery, 2 of matches, 9 of fish oil, 5 of sails, 6 of tin, copper, and sheet-iron ware, 3 wool-carding and cloth-dressing establishments, 4 establishments for curing and packing fish, 4 flour mills, 19 saw mills, and 15 ship building and repairing establishments. Capital, Wis-casset.

II. A W. County Of West Virginia

II. A W. County Of West Virginia, intersected by the Guyandotte river; area, about 350 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 5,053, of whom 36 were colored. The surface is hilly and well wooded; the soil is productive. Iron and coal are abundant. The chief productions in 1870 were 6,260 bushels of wheat, 104,961 of Indian corn, 12,054 of oats, 7,151 lbs. of wool, 56,083 of tobacco, and 48,271 of butter. There were 547 horses, 950 milch cows, 1,607 other cattle, 3,874 sheep, and 4,051 swine. Capital, Hamlin.

III. A S. W. County Of North Carolina

III. A S. W. County Of North Carolina, intersected by the South Catawba and bounded E. by the Great Catawba; area, 275 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 9,573, of whom 2,759 were colored. The surface is undulating, and the soil fertile. Gold is found in the eastern portion, and iron is abundant. The western division of the Wilmington, Charlotte, and Rutherford railroad passes through it. The chief productions in 1870 were 42,155 bushels of wheat, 190,286 of Indian corn, 52,396 of oats, 12,572 of sweet potatoes, 44,674 lbs. of butter, and 242 bales of cotton. There were 1,022 horses, 681 mules and asses, 1,739 milch cows, 2,183 other cattle, 4,971 sheep, and 7,567 swine; 1 manufactory of cotton goods, and 3 of pig iron. Capital, Lincolnton.

IV. A N. E. County Of Georgia

IV. A N. E. County Of Georgia, bounded N. E. by the Savannah river, which separates it from South Carolina; area, 220 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 5,413, of whom 3,616 were colored. The surface is hilly and the soil moderately fertile. The chief productions in 1870 were 75,606 bushels of Indian corn, 21,275 of oats, 7,918 of sweet potatoes, and 2,587 bales of cotton. There were 462 horses, 508 mules and asses, 1,054 milch cows, 1,852 other cattle, 1,360 sheep, and 3,317 swine; 11 flour mills, and 6 saw mills. Capital, Lincolnton.

V. A S. W. County Of Mississippi

V. A S. W. County Of Mississippi, watered by affluents of Pearl river and by the Bogue Chitto and Homochitto rivers; area, about 600 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 10,184, of whom 4,162 were colored. The surface is uneven and largely occupied by pine forests; the soil is moderately fertile. The New Orleans and Jackson railroad passes through it. The chief productions in 1870 were 144,364 bushels of Indian corn, 25,052 of sweet potatoes, 3,850 bales of cotton, and 23,406 lbs. of rice. There were 1,121 horses, 2,084 milch cows, 1,018 working oxen, 3,056 other cattle, 4,144 sheep, and 8,882 swine. Capital, Brookhaven.

VI. A N. W. Parish Of Louisiana

VI. A N. W. Parish Of Louisiana, formed in 1873 from portions of Bienville, Claiborne, Jackson, and Union parishes; area, 550 sq. m. It is watered by Bayou d'Arbonne and other streams. The surface is undulating and the soil mostly fertile. Capital, Vienna.

VII. A S. E. County Of Arkansas

VII. A S. E. County Of Arkansas, formed since the census of 1870, bounded N. E. by the Arkansas river, and S. W. by the Saline, and intersected by Bayou Bartholomew; area, about 700 sq. m. The surface is level and partly covered by forests of cypress, ash, etc.; the soil is fertile. Capital, Star City.

VIII. A S. County Of Tennessee

VIII. A S. County Of Tennessee, bordering on Alabama; area, 650 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 28,050, of whom 5,953 were colored. The Elk river intersects it from E. to W. The surface is undulating and the soil fertile. It is well watered, the streams affording valuable water power. The Winchester and Alabama railroad terminates at the county seat. The chief productions in 1870 were 202,497 bushels of wheat, 1,233,960 of Indian corn, 72,179 of oats, 29,982 of Irish and 23,103 of sweet potatoes, 31,837 lbs. of tobacco, 48,113 of wool, 318,173 of butter, and 3,745 bales of cotton. There were 7,968 horses, 3,434 mules and asses, 6,934 milch cows, 1,371 working oxen, 8,099 other cattle, 27,075 sheep, and 26,595 swine; 1 manufactory of cotton yarn, 7 of saddlery and harness, 1 of woollen goods, 13 tanneries, 13 currying establishments, 9 saw mills, and 8 flour mills. Capital, Fayetteville.

IX. An E. Central County Of Kentucky

IX. An E. Central County Of Kentucky, drained by Dick's river and its branches, and by the sources of Green river; area, 280 sq. m.; pop. in 1870,10,947, of whom 3,076 were colored. The surface is undulating and the soil fertile. The Knoxville and Richmond branches of the Louisville and Nashville railroad pass through it. The chief productions in 1870 were 61,306 bushels of wheat, 16,148 of rye, 321,438 of Indian corn, 72,611 of oats, 13,499 of potatoes, 17,840 lbs. of wool, 160,860 of butter, and 2,596 tons of hay. There were 2,678 horses, 1,706 mules and asses, 2,153 milch cows, 7,165 other cattle, 7,422 sheep, and 13,157 swine; 4 manufactories of saddlery and harness, 1 of woollen goods, 3 distilleries, and 9 saw mills. Capital, Stanford.

X. A S. Central County Of Minnesota; Area

X. A S. Central County Of Minnesota; Area, 432 sq. m.; pop. not reported in the census of 1870. It is watered by Hassan river and Buffalo creek.

XI. An E. County Of Missouri

XI. An E. County Of Missouri, separated from Illinois by the Mississippi river; area, 576 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 15,960, of whom 1,987 were colored. It is drained by the Cuivre or Copper river and its branches, and by the Eagle fork and Big creek. The surface is undulating and the soil fertile. The chief productions in 1870 were 144,364 bushels of Indian corn, 25,052 of sweet potatoes, 3,850 bales of cotton, and 23,406 lbs. of rice. There were 1,121 horses, 2,084 milch cows, 1,018 working oxen, 3,056 other cattle, 4,144 sheep, and 8,882 swine; 4 flour mills, 3 saw mills, 1 leather-currying establishment, 2 tobacco factories, and 4 wool-carding and cloth - dressing establishments. Capital, Troy.

XII. A Central County Of Kansas

XII. A Central County Of Kansas, intersected by Saline river and Covert creek; area, 720 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 516. The chief productions in 1870 were 1,785 bushels of wheat, 9,536 of Indian corn, and 319 tons of hay; value of live stock, $33,436. Capital, Rocky Hill.

XIII. A W. County Of Nebraska

XIII. A W. County Of Nebraska, intersected by the Platte river; area, 2,592 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 17. It is traversed by the Union Pacific railroad. Capital, North Platte.

XIV. The S. E. County Of Nevada

XIV. The S. E. County Of Nevada, bounded E. by Utah and Arizona, from which it is in part separated by the Colorado river, and S. W. by California; area, 14,000 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 2,985, of whom 11 were Chinese. It is generally barren and waterless, but there is some agricultural land in Meadow valley in the N. E., and in the valley of the Virgin, which empties into the Colorado. The principal agricultural region is the Pahranagat valley, in the N. W., 20 m. long and 6 m. wide. There are mines of silver at Pioche in the N. E., at Potosi in the S. W., in El Dorado canon, and in the Pahranagat district. The chief productions in 1870 were 2,995 bushels of wheat, 6,080 of Indian corn, 4,200 of bar-\ey, 4,690 lbs. of wool, and 1,169 tons of hay. There were 581 horses, 500 milch cows, 1,125 other cattle, 1,674 sheep, and 120 swine; 1 brewery, and 2 quartz mills. Capital, Pioche.

XV. A S. E. County Of New Mexico

XV. A S. E. County Of New Mexico, bordering on Texas, and intersected by the Rio Pecos; area, about 13,000 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 1,803. The W. part is mountainous; the E. portion is occupied by the Llano Estacado or Staked Plain. The chief productions in 1870 were 13,607 bushels of wheat, 134,162 of Indian corn, and 2,843 of barley. Capital, Placita.

XVI. A S. E. County Of Dakota

XVI. A S. E. County Of Dakota, separated from Iowa on the E. by the Big Sioux river; area, about 600 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 712. The chief productions in 1870 were 4,830 bushels of wheat, 3,318 of Indian corn, 1,386 of oats, 295 of barley, 3,301 of potatoes, and 17,340 lbs. of butter. There were 112 horses and 864 cattle. Capital, Canton.